• We present optical observations of an exceptional Type II supernova, ASASSN-15nx. Its peak luminosity at M_V = -20 mag is between those of typical core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) and super-luminous supernovae (SLSNe). The post-peak multi-band optical light curves show a remarkably long, linear decline with a steep slope of 2.5 mag / 100 d (i.e., an exponential decline in flux), through to the end of our observations at phase ~ 260d. In contrast, the light curves of the two major subclasses of SNe II, Type II-P ("plateau") and Type II-L ("linear"), always show breaks in slopes at phase ~100 d, before settling onto Co56 radioactive decay tails with a decline rate typically of about 1 mag / 100 d. The spectra of ASASSN-15nx do not exhibit the narrow emission-line features characteristic of Type IIn SNe, which can have a wide variety of light-curve shapes usually attributed to strong interactions with circumstellar medium (CSM). ASASSN-15nx also exhibits a number of peculiar spectroscopic properties, including a relatively weak H-alpha emission line that has an unusually triangularly-shaped profile with no absorption component. The physical origin giving rise to these peculiarities is unclear, while the long and linear post-peak light curve without a break likely suggests a single dominant powering mechanism. The light curve is consistent with being predominantly powered by the decay of a large amount of Ni56 (M_Ni = 1.6 +/- 0.2 M_sun), and substantial gamma-ray escape from the ejecta is needed to explain the steep light-curve slope, which is possibly due to a low-mass hydrogen envelope of the progenitor. Another possibility is strong CSM interactions mostly powering the light curve, and the CSM needs to be sculpted to produce the unique light-curve shape as well as avoid producing SN IIn-like narrow emission lines.
  • We present a new empirical \(JHK\) absolute calibration of the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We use published data from the extensive \emph{Near-Infrared Synoptic Survey} containing 3.5 million stars, of which 65,000 are red giants that fall within one magnitude of the TRGB. Adopting the TRGB slopes from a companion study of the isolated dwarf galaxy IC\,1613 as well as an LMC distance modulus of \(\mu_0 = \)~18.49~mag from (geometric) detached eclipsing binaries, we derive absolute \(JHK\) zero-points for the near-infrared TRGB. For comparison with measurements in the bar alone, we apply the calibrated \(JHK\) TRGB to a 500 deg\textsuperscript{2} area of the 2MASS survey. The TRGB reveals the 3-dimensional structure of the LMC with a tilt in the direction perpendicular to the major axis of the bar, in agreement with previous studies.
  • Based on observations from the \emph{FourStar} near-infrared camera on the 6.5m Baade-Magellan telescope at Las Campanas, Chile, we present calibrations of the $JHK$ luminosities of stars defining the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) in the halo of the Local Group dwarf galaxy IC 1613. We employ metallicity-independent (rectified) T-band magnitudes---constructed using $J,H$ and $K$-band magnitudes and both $(J-H)~ \& ~(J-K)$ colors in order to flatten the upward-sloping red giant branch tips as otherwise seen in their apparent color-magnitude diagrams. We describe and quantify the advantages of working at these particular near-infrared wavelengths, which are applicable to both \emph{HST} and \emph{JWST}. We also note that these same wavelengths can be accessed from the ground for an eventual tie-in to \emph{Gaia} for absolute astrometry and parallaxes to calibrate the intrinsic luminosity of the TRGB. Adopting the color terms derived from the IC 1613 data, as well as the zero-points from a companion study of the Large Magellanic Cloud whose distance is anchored to the geometric distances of detached eclipsing binaries, we find a true distance modulus of 24.32 $\pm$ 0.02~ (statistical) $\pm$ 0.06~mag (systematic) for IC 1613, which compares favorably with the recently published multi-wavelength, multi-method consensus modulus of 24.30 $\pm$ 0.05~mag by Hatt et al. (2017).
  • 11 hours after the detection of gravitational wave source GW170817 by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and Virgo Interferometers, an associated optical transient SSS17a was discovered in the galaxy NGC 4993. While the gravitational wave data indicate GW170817 is consistent with the merger of two compact objects, the electromagnetic observations provide independent constraints of the nature of that system. Here we synthesize all optical and near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of SSS17a collected by the One-Meter Two-Hemisphere collaboration. We find that SSS17a is unlike other known transients. The source is best described by theoretical models of a kilonova consisting of radioactive elements produced by rapid neutron capture (the r-process). We find that SSS17a was the result of a binary neutron star merger, reinforcing the gravitational wave result.
  • The merging neutron star gravitational wave event GW170817 has been observed throughout the entire electromagnetic spectrum from radio waves to $\gamma$-rays. The resulting energetics, variability, and light curves are shown to be consistent with GW170817 originating from the merger of two neutron stars, in all likelihood followed by the prompt gravitational collapse of the massive remnant. The available $\gamma$-ray, X-ray and radio data provide a clear probe for the nature of the relativistic ejecta and the non-thermal processes occurring within, while the ultraviolet, optical and infrared emission are shown to probe material torn during the merger and subsequently heated by the decay of freshly synthesized $r$-process material. The simplest hypothesis that the non-thermal emission is due to a low-luminosity short $\gamma$-ray burst (sGRB) seems to agree with the present data. While low luminosity sGRBs might be common, we show here that the collective prompt and multi-wavelength observations are also consistent with a typical, powerful sGRB seen off-axis. Detailed follow-up observations are thus essential before we can place stringent constraints on the nature of the relativistic ejecta in GW170817.
  • We discovered Swope Supernova Survey 2017a (SSS17a) in the LIGO/Virgo Collaboration (LVC) localization volume of GW170817, the first detected binary neutron star (BNS) merger, only 10.9 hours after the trigger. No object was present at the location of SSS17a only a few days earlier, providing a qualitative spatial and temporal association with GW170817. Here we quantify this association, finding that SSS17a is almost certainly the counterpart of GW170817, with the chance of a coincidence being < 9 x 10^-6 (90% confidence). We arrive at this conclusion by comparing the optical properties of SSS17a to other known astrophysical transients, finding that SSS17a fades and cools faster than any other observed transient. For instance, SSS17a fades >5 mag in g within 7 days of our first data point while all other known transients of similar luminosity fade by <1 mag during the same time period. Its spectra are also unique, being mostly featureless, even as it cools. The rarity of "SSS17a-like" transients combined with the relatively small LVC localization volume and recent non-detection imply the extremely unlikely chance coincidence. We find that the volumetric rate of SSS17a-like transients is < 1.6 x 10^4 Gpc^-3 year^-1 and the Milky Way rate is <0.19 per century. A transient survey designed to discover similar events should be high cadence and observe in red filters. The LVC will likely detect substantially more BNS mergers than current optical surveys will independently discover SSS17a-like transients, however a 1-day cadence survey with LSST could discover an order of magnitude more events.
  • IC 1613 is an isolated dwarf galaxy within the Local Group. Low foreground and internal extinction, low metallicity, and low crowding make it an invaluable testbed for the calibration of the local distance ladder. We present new, high-fidelity distance estimates to IC 1613 via its Tip of the Red Giant Branch (TRGB) and its RR Lyrae (RRL) variables as part of the Carnegie-Chicago Hubble Program, which seeks an alternate local route to \ho using Population II stars. We have measured a TRGB magnitude I=20.35+/-0.01 (statistical)+/-0.01 (systematic) using wide-field observations obtained from the IMACS camera on the Magellan-Baade telescope. We have further constructed optical and near-infrared RRL light curves using archival BI- and new H- band observations from the ACS/WFC and WFC3/IR instruments aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). In advance of future Gaia data releases, we set provisional values for the TRGB luminosity via the Large Magellanic Cloud and Galactic RRL zero-points via HST parallaxes. We find corresponding true distance moduli \mu(TRGB)=24.30+/-0.03 (statistical)+/-0.05 (systematic) and \mu(RRL)=24.28+/-0.04 (statistical+systematic). We compare our results to a body of recent publications on IC 1613 and find no statistically significant difference between the distances derived from stars of Population I and II.
  • We present final natural system optical (ugriBV) and near-infrared (YJH) photometry of 134 supernovae (SNe) with probable white dwarf progenitors that were observed in 2004-2009 as part of the first stage of the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I). The sample consists of 123 Type Ia SNe, 5 Type Iax SNe, 2 super-Chandrasekhar SN candidates, 2 Type Ia SNe interacting with circumstellar matter, and 2 SN 2006bt-like events. The redshifts of the objects range from z = 0.0037 to 0.0835; the median redshift is 0.0241. For 120 (90%) of these SNe, near-infrared photometry was obtained. Average optical extinction coefficients and color terms are derived and demonstrated to be stable during the five CSP-I observing campaigns. Measurements of the CSP-I near-infrared bandpasses are also described, and near-infrared color terms are estimated through synthetic photometry of stellar atmosphere models. Optical and near-infrared magnitudes of local sequences of tertiary standard stars for each supernova are given, and a new calibration of Y-band magnitudes of the Persson et al. (1998) standards in the CSP-I natural system is presented.
  • We present 888 visual-wavelength spectra of 122 nearby type II supernovae (SNe II) obtained between 1986 and 2009, and ranging between 3 and 363 days post explosion. In this first paper, we outline our observations and data reduction techniques, together with a characterization based on the spectral diversity of SNe~II. A statistical analysis of the spectral matching technique is discussed as an alternative to non-detection constraints for estimating SN explosion epochs. The time evolution of spectral lines is presented and analysed in terms of how this differs for SNe of different photometric, spectral, and environmental properties: velocities, pseudo-equivalent widths, decline rates, magnitudes, time durations, and environment metallicity. Our sample displays a large range in ejecta expansion velocities, from $\sim9600$ to $\sim1500$ km s$^{-1}$ at 50 days post explosion with a median H$_{\alpha}$ value of 7300 km s$^{-1}$. This is most likely explained through differing explosion energies. Significant diversity is also observed in the absolute strength of spectral lines, characterised through their pseudo-equivalent widths. This implies significant diversity in both temperature evolution (linked to progenitor radius) and progenitor metallicity between different SNe~II. Around 60\% of our sample show an extra absorption component on the blue side of the H$_{\alpha}$ P-Cygni profile ("Cachito" feature) between 7 and 120 days since explosion. Studying the nature of Cachito, we conclude that these features at early times (before $\sim35$ days) are associated with \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda6355$, while past the middle of the plateau phase they are related to high velocity (HV) features of hydrogen lines.
  • The spatial distribution of oxygen in the interstellar medium of galaxies is the key to understanding how efficiently metals that are synthesized in massive stars can be redistributed across a galaxy. We present here a case study in the nearby spiral galaxy NGC1365 using 3D optical data obtained in the TYPHOON Program. We find systematic azimuthal variations of the HII region oxygen abundance imprinted on a negative radial gradient. The 0.2 dex azimuthal variations occur over a wide radial range of 0.3 to 0.7 R25 and peak at the two spiral arms in NGC1365. We show that the azimuthal variations can be explained by two physical processes: gas undergoes localized, sub-kpc scale self-enrichment when orbiting in the inter-arm region, and experiences efficient, kpc scale mixing-induced dilution when spiral density waves pass through. We construct a simple chemical evolution model to quantitatively test this picture and find that our toy model can reproduce the observations. This result suggests that the observed abundance variations in NGC1365 are a snapshot of the dynamical local enrichment of oxygen modulated by spiral-driven, periodic mixing and dilution.
  • We present new theoretical period-luminosity-metallicity (PLZ) relations for RR Lyrae stars (RRL) at Spitzer and WISE wavelengths. The PLZ relations were derived using nonlinear, time-dependent convective hydrodynamical models for a broad range in metal abundances (Z=0.0001 to 0.0198). In deriving the light curves, we tested two sets of atmospheric models (Brott & Hauschildt 2005, Castelli & Kurucz 2003) and found no significant difference between the resulting mean magnitudes. We also compare our theoretical relations to empirical relations derived from RRL in both the field and in the globular cluster M4. Our theoretical PLZ relations were combined with multi-wavelength observations to simultaneously fit the distance modulus, mu_0, and extinction, Av, of both the individual Galactic RRL and of the cluster M4. The results for the Galactic RRL are consistent with trigonometric parallax measurements from Gaia's first data release. For M4, we find a distance modulus of $\mu_0=11.257 \pm 0.035$ mag with $A_V = 1.45 \pm 0.12$ mag, which is consistent with measurements from other distance indicators. This analysis has shown that when considering a sample covering a range of iron abundances, the metallicity spread introduces a dispersion in the PL relation on the order of 0.13 mag. However, if this metallicity component is accounted for in a PLZ relation, the dispersion is reduced to ~0.02 mag at MIR wavelengths.
  • The Carnegie-Chicago Hubble Program seeks to anchor the distance scale of Type Ia supernovae via the Tip of the Red Giant Branch (TRGB). Based on deep $Hubble$ $Space$ $Telescope$ ACS/WFC imaging, we present an analysis of the TRGB for the metal-poor halo of NGC 1365, a giant spiral galaxy in the Fornax Cluster that is host to the supernova SN2012fr. We have measured its extinction-corrected TRGB magnitude to be F814W $= 27.34 \pm 0.03_{stat} \pm0.01_{sys}$ mag. In advance of future direct calibration by $Gaia$, we set a provisional TRGB luminosity via the Large Magellanic Cloud and find a true distance modulus $\mu_0 = 31.29 \pm 0.04_{stat}\pm0.05_{sys}$ mag or $D = 18.1 \pm 0.3_{stat} \pm0.4_{sys}$ Mpc. This high-fidelity measurement shows excellent agreement with recent Cepheid-based distances to NGC 1365 and suggests no significant difference in the distances derived from stars of Population I and II. We revisit the error budget for the $CCHP$ path to the Hubble Constant based on this analysis of one of our most distant hosts, finding a 2.5% measurement is feasible with our current sample.
  • We present a multi-wavelength compilation of new and previously-published photometry for 55 Galactic field RR Lyrae variables. Individual studies, spanning a time baseline of up to 30 years, are self-consistently phased to produce light curves in 10 photometric bands covering the wavelength range from 0.4 to 4.5 microns. Data smoothing via the GLOESS technique is described and applied to generate high-fidelity light curves, from which mean magnitudes, amplitudes, rise-times, and times of minimum and maximum light are derived. 60,000 observations were acquired using the new robotic Three-hundred MilliMeter Telescope (TMMT), which was first deployed at the Carnegie Observatories in Pasadena, CA, and is now permanently installed and operating at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. We provide a full description of the TMMT hardware, software, and data reduction pipeline. Archival photometry contributed approximately 31,000 observations. Photometric data are given in the standard Johnson UBV, Kron-Cousins RI, 2MASS JHK, and Spitzer [3.6] & [4.5] bandpasses.
  • Estimates of galaxy distances based on indicators that are independent of cosmological redshift are fundamental to astrophysics. Researchers use them to establish the extragalactic distance scale, to underpin estimates of the Hubble constant, and to study peculiar velocities induced by gravitational attractions that perturb the motions of galaxies with respect to the Hubble flow of universal expansion. In 2006 the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED) began making available a comprehensive compilation of redshift-independent extragalactic distance estimates. A decade later, this compendium of distances (NED-D) now contains more than 100,000 individual estimates based on primary and secondary indicators, available for more than 28,000 galaxies, and compiled from over 2,000 references in the refereed astronomical literature. This article describes the methodology, content, and use of NED-D, and addresses challenges to be overcome in compiling such distances. Currently, 75 different distance indicators are in use. We include a figure that facilitates comparison of the indicators with significant numbers of estimates in terms of the minimum, 25th percentile, median, 75th percentile, and maximum distances spanned. Brief descriptions of the indicators, including examples of their use in the database, are given in an Appendix.
  • We present an overview of the Carnegie-Chicago Hubble Program, an ongoing program to obtain a 3 per cent measurement of the Hubble constant using alternative methods to the traditional Cepheid distance scale. We aim to establish a completely independent route to the Hubble constant using RR Lyrae variables, the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB), and Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). This alternative distance ladder can be applied to galaxies of any Hubble Type, of any inclination, and, utilizing old stars in low density environments, is robust to the degenerate effects of metallicity and interstellar extinction. Given the relatively small number of SNe Ia host galaxies with independently measured distances, these properties provide a great systematic advantage in the measurement of the Hubble constant via the distance ladder. Initially, the accuracy of our value of the Hubble constant will be set by the five Galactic RR Lyrae calibrators with Hubble Space Telescope Fine-Guidance Sensor parallaxes. With Gaia, both the RR Lyrae zero point and TRGB method will be independently calibrated, the former with at least an order of magnitude more calibrators and the latter directly through parallax measurement of tip red giants. As the first end-to-end "distance ladder" completely independent of both Cepheid variables and the Large Magellanic Cloud, this path to the Hubble constant will allow for the high precision comparison at each rung of the traditional distance ladder that is necessary to understand tensions between this and other routes to the Hubble constant.
  • We provide evidence that UGC1382, long believed to be a passive elliptical galaxy, is actually a giant low surface brightness (GLSB) galaxy which rivals the archetypical GLSB Malin 1 in size. Like other GLSB galaxies, it has two components: a high surface brightness disk galaxy surrounded by an extended low surface brightness (LSB) disk. For UGC1382, the central component is a lenticular system with an effective radius of 6 kpc. Beyond this, the LSB disk has an effective radius of ~38 kpc and an extrapolated central surface brightness of ~26 mag/arcsec^2. Both components have a combined stellar mass of ~8x10^10 M_sun, and are embedded in a massive (10^10 M_sun) low-density (<3 M_sun/pc^2) HI disk with a radius of 110 kpc, making this one of the largest isolated disk galaxies known. The system resides in a massive dark matter halo of at least 2x10^12 M_sun. Although possibly part of a small group, its low density environment likely plays a role in the formation and retention of the giant LSB and HI disks. We model the spectral energy distributions and find that the LSB disk is likely older than the lenticular component. UGC1382 has UV-optical colors typical of galaxies transitioning through the green valley. Within the LSB disk are spiral arms forming stars at extremely low efficiencies. The gas depletion time scale of ~10^11 yr suggests that UGC1382 may be a very long term resident of the green valley. We find that the formation and evolution of the LSB disk is best explained by the accretion of gas-rich LSB dwarf galaxies.
  • We compare mid-infrared 3.6 and 4.5 $\mu$m Warm Spitzer observations for Cepheids in the Milky Way and the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. Using models, we explore in detail the effect of the CO rotation-vibration band-head at 4.6 $\mu$m on the mid-infrared photometry. We confirm the temperature sensitivity of the CO band-head at 4.6 $\mu$m and find no evidence for an effect at 3.6 $\mu$m. We compare the ([3.6]-[4.5]) period-colour relations in the MW, LMC, and SMC. The slopes of the period-colour relations for the three galaxies are in good agreement, but there is a trend in zero-point with metallicity, with the lowest metallicity Cepheids having redder mid-IR colours. Finally, we present a colour-[Fe/H] relation based on published spectroscopic metallicities. This empirical relation, calibrated to the metallicity system of Genovali et al. (2014), demonstrates that the ([3.6]-[4.5]) colour provides a reliable metallicity indicator for Cepheids, with a precision comparable to current spectroscopic determinations.
  • We use mid-infrared 3.6 and 4.5microns imaging of NGC 3906 from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G) to understand the nature of an unusual offset between its stellar bar and the photometric center of an otherwise regular, circular outer stellar disk. We measure an offset of ~720 pc between the center of the stellar bar and photometric center of the stellar disk; the bar center coincides with the kinematic center of the disk determined from previous HI observations. Although the undisturbed shape of the disk suggests that NGC 3906 has not undergone a significant merger event in its recent history, the most plausible explanation for the observed offset is an interaction. Given the relatively isolated nature of NGC 3906 this interaction could be with dark matter sub structure in the galaxy's halo or from a recent interaction with a fast moving neighbor which remains to be identified. Simulations aimed at reproducing the observed offset between the stellar bar / kinematic center of the system and the photometric center of the disk are necessary to confirm this hypothesis and constrain the interaction history of the galaxy.
  • We explore trends in galaxy properties with Mpc-scale structures using catalogues of environment and large scale structure from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. Existing GAMA catalogues of large scale structure, group and pair membership allow us to construct galaxy stellar mass functions for different environmental types. To avoid simply extracting the known underlying correlations between galaxy properties and stellar mass, we create a mass matched sample of galaxies with stellar masses between $9.5 \leq \log{M_*/h^{-2} M_{\odot}} \leq 11$ for each environmental population. Using these samples, we show that mass normalised galaxies in different large scale environments have similar energy outputs, $u-r$ colours, luminosities, and morphologies. Extending our analysis to group and pair environments, we show galaxies that are not in groups or pairs exhibit similar characteristics to each other regardless of broader environment. For our mass controlled sample, we fail to see a strong dependence of S\'{e}rsic index or galaxy luminosity on halo mass, but do find that it correlates very strongly with colour. Repeating our analysis for galaxies that have not been mass controlled introduces and amplifies trends in the properties of galaxies in pairs, groups, and large scale structure, indicating that stellar mass is the most important predictor of the galaxy properties we examine, as opposed to environmental classifications.
  • We report the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy (NGC6503-d1) during the Subaru extended ultraviolet (XUV) disk survey. It is a likely companion of the spiral galaxy NGC6503. The resolved images, in B, V, R, i, and Halpha, show an irregular appearance due to bright stars with underlying, smooth and unresolved stellar emission. It is classified as the transition type (dIrr/dSph). Its structural properties are similar to those of the dwarfs in the Local Group, with a V absolute magnitude ~ -10.5, half-light radius ~400 pc, and central surface brightness ~25.2. Despite the low stellar surface brightness environment, one HII region was detected, though its Halpha luminosity is low, indicating an absence of any appreciable O-stars at the current epoch. The presence of multiple stellar populations is indicated by the color-magnitude diagram of ~300 bright resolved stars and the total colors of the dwarf, with the majority of its total stellar mass ~4x10^6 Msun in an old stellar population.
  • Using Spitzer observations of classical Cepheids we have measured the true average distance modulus of the SMC to be $18.96 \pm 0.01_{stat} \pm 0.03_{sys}$ mag (corresponding to $62 \pm 0.3$ kpc), which is $0.48 \pm 0.01$ mag more distant than the LMC. This is in agreement with previous results from Cepheid observations, as well as with measurements from other indicators such as RR Lyrae stars and the tip of the red giant branch. Utilizing the properties of the mid--infrared Leavitt Law we measured precise distances to individual Cepheids in the SMC, and have confirmed that the galaxy is tilted and elongated such that its eastern side is up to 20 kpc closer than its western side. This is in agreement with the results from red clump stars and dynamical simulations of the Magellanic Clouds and Stream.
  • We have measured the radial light profiles and global shapes of bars using two-dimensional 3.6 $\mu m $ image decompositions for 144 face-on barred galaxies from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G). The bar surface brightness profile is correlated with the stellar mass and bulge-to-total (B/T) ratio of their host galaxies. Bars in massive and bulge-dominated galaxies (B/T$>$0.2) show a flat profile, while bars in less massive, disk-dominated galaxies (B/T$\sim$0) show an exponential, disk-like profile with a wider spread in the radial profile than in the bulge-dominated galaxies. The global two-dimensional shapes of bars, however, are rectangular/boxy, independent of the bulge or disk properties. We speculate that because bars are formed out of disk, bars initially have an exponential (disk-like) profile which evolves over time, trapping more stars into the boxy bar orbits. This leads bars to become stronger and have flatter profiles. The narrow spread of bar radial profiles in more massive disks suggests that these bars formed earlier (z$>$1), while the disk-like profiles and a larger spread in the radial profile in less massive systems imply a later and more gradual evolution, consistent with the cosmological evolution of bars inferred from observational studies. Therefore, we expect that the flatness of the bar profile can be used as a dynamical age indicator of the bar to measure the time elapsed since the bar formation. We argue that cosmic gas accretion is required to explain our results on bar profile and the presence of gas within the bar region.
  • We present a revised distance to the nearby galaxy NGC6822 using a new multi-band fit to both previously published and new optical, near- and mid-infrared data for Cepheid variables. The new data presented in this study include multi-epoch observations obtained in 3.6\um and 4.5\um with the \emph{Spitzer Space Telescope} taken for the Carnegie Hubble Program. We also present new observations in J, H and \kswith FourStar on the Magellan Baade telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. We determine mean magnitudes and present new period-luminosity relations in V, I, J, H, \ks, IRAC 3.6\um and 4.5\um. In addition to using the multi-band distance moduli to calculate extinction and a true distance, we present a new method for determining an extinction-corrected distance modulus from multi-band data with varying sample sizes. We combine the distance moduli and extinction for individual stars to determine $E(B-V)=0.35\pm0.04$ and a true distance modulus $\mu_{o}=23.38\pm0.02_{stat}\pm0.04_{sys}$.
  • We present a catalogue and images of visually detected features, such as asymmetries, extensions, warps, shells, tidal tails, polar rings, and obvious signs of mergers or interactions, in the faint outer regions (at and outside of R_25) of nearby galaxies. This catalogue can be used in future quantitative studies that examine galaxy evolution due to internal and external factors. We are able to reliably detect outer region features down to a brightness level of 0.03 MJy/sr per pixel at 3.6 microns in the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G). We also tabulate companion galaxies. We find asymmetries in the outer isophotes in 22+/-1 per cent of the sample. The asymmetry fraction does not correlate with galaxy classification as an interacting galaxy or merger remnant, or with the presence of companions. We also compare the detected features to similar features in galaxies taken from cosmological zoom re-simulations. The simulated images have a higher fraction (33 per cent) of outer disc asymmetries, which may be due to selection effects and an uncertain star formation threshold in the models. The asymmetries may have either an internal (e.g., lopsidedness due to dark halo asymmetry) or external origin.
  • We present an updated analysis of the intrinsic colors of SNe Ia using the latest data release of the Carnegie Supernova Project. We introduce a new light-curve parameter very similar to stretch that is better suited for fast-declining events, and find that these peculiar types can be seen as extensions to the population of "normal" SNe Ia. With a larger number of objects, an updated fit to the Lira relation is presented along with evidence for a dependence on the late-time slope of the B-V color-curves with stretch and color. Using the full wavelength range from u to H band, we place constraints on the reddening law for the sample as a whole and also for individual events/hosts based solely on the observed colors. The photometric data continue to favor low values of Rv, though with large variations from event to event, indicating an intrinsic distribution. We confirm the findings of other groups that there appears to be a correlation between the derived reddening law, Rv, and the color excess, E(B-V), such that larger E(B-V) tends to favor lower Rv. The intrinsic u-band colors show a relatively large scatter that cannot be explained by variations in Rv or by the Goobar (2008) power-law for circumstellar dust, but rather is correlated with spectroscopic features of the supernova and is therefore likely due to metallicity effects.