• We present Hubble Space Telescope STIS far-UV spectra of the edge-on disk around 49 Ceti, one of the very few debris disks showing sub-mm CO emission. Many atomic absorption lines are present in the spectra, most of which arise from circumstellar gas lying along the line-of-sight to the central star. We determined the line-of-sight CI column density, estimated the total carbon column density, and set limits on the OI column density. Surprisingly, no line-of-sight CO absorption was seen. We discuss possible explanations for this non-detection, and present preliminary estimates of the carbon abundances in the line-of-sight gas. The C/Fe ratio is much greater than the solar value, suggesting that 49 Cet harbors a volatile-rich gas disk similar to that of Beta Pictoris.
  • Some hot DA white dwarfs have circumstellar high ion absorption features in their spectra, in addition to those originating in the photosphere. In many cases, the line profiles of these absorbing components are unresolved. Given the importance of the atmospheric composition of white dwarfs to studies of stellar evolution, extra-solar planetary systems and the interstellar medium, we examine the effect of including circumstellar line profiles in the abundance estimates of photospheric metals in six DA stars. The photospheric C and Si abundances are reduced in five cases where the circumstellar contamination is strong, though the relative weakness of the circumstellar Si IV absorption introduces minimal contamination, resulting in a small change in abundance. The inability of previous, approximate models to reproduce the photospheric line profiles here demonstrates the need for a technique that accounts for the physical line profiles of both the circumstellar and photospheric lines when modelling these blended absorption features.
  • Some hot DA stars exhibit circumstellar absorption in the metal resonance lines in their spectra. In many cases, these circumstellar features are unresolved from those originating in the photosphere. To better understand the effect this circumstellar blending has on photospheric abundance estimates, we present here an analysis of the unresolved metal high ion absorption features of six hot white dwarfs. In all cases, given the strong circumstellar C IV detections, the photospheric C IV abundances are reduced; conversely the weak circumstellar Si IV leads to modest photospheric abundance revisions. A possible new technique for modelling these line profiles is discussed, that can better reproduce the observations and provide a greater insight into the conditions of the circumstellar medium.
  • Using archival observations recorded over a 5+ year timeframe with the NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite, we present a study of the ultraviolet (UV) variability of 4360 quasars of redshifts up to z=2.5 that have optical counterparts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR5 spectroscopic catalog. The observed changes in both the far UV (FUV: 1350-1785A) and near UV (NUV: 1770-2830A) AB magnitudes as a function of time may help differentiate between models of the emission mechanisms thought to operate in these active galaxies. A list of NUV and FUV variable quasars was derived from the UV light-curves of sources with 5 or more observational visits by GALEX that spanned a time-frame greater than 3 months. By measuring the error in the derived mean UV magnitude from the series of GALEX observations for each source, quasars whose UV variability was greater than the 3-sigma variance from the mean observed value were deemed to be (intrinsically) UV variable. This conservative selection criterion (which was applied to both FUV and NUV observations) resulted in identifying 550 NUV and 371 FUV quasars as being statistically significant UV variable objects.
  • We measure the UV-optical color dependence of galaxy clustering in the local universe. Using the clean separation of the red and blue sequences made possible by the NUV - r color-magnitude diagram, we segregate the galaxies into red, blue and intermediate "green" classes. We explore the clustering as a function of this segregation by removing the dependence on luminosity and by excluding edge-on galaxies as a means of a non-model dependent veto of highly extincted galaxies. We find that \xi (r_p, \pi) for both red and green galaxies shows strong redshift space distortion on small scales -- the "finger-of-God" effect, with green galaxies having a lower amplitude than is seen for the red sequence, and the blue sequence showing almost no distortion. On large scales, \xi (r_p, \pi) for all three samples show the effect of large-scale streaming from coherent infall. On scales 1 Mpc/h < r_p < 10 Mpc/h, the projected auto-correlation function w_p(r_p) for red and green galaxies fits a power-law with slope \gamma ~ 1.93 and amplitude r_0 ~ 7.5 and 5.3, compared with \gamma ~ 1.75 and r_0 ~ 3.9 Mpc/h for blue sequence galaxies. Compared to the clustering of a fiducial L* galaxy, the red, green, and blue have a relative bias of 1.5, 1.1, and 0.9 respectively. The w_p(r_p) for blue galaxies display an increase in convexity at ~ 1 Mpc/h, with an excess of large scale clustering. Our results suggest that the majority of blue galaxies are likely central galaxies in less massive halos, while red and green galaxies have larger satellite fractions, and preferentially reside in virialized structures. If blue sequence galaxies migrate to the red sequence via processes like mergers or quenching that take them through the green valley, such a transformation may be accompanied by a change in environment in addition to any change in luminosity and color.
  • We present high resolution (R = 114,000) ultraviolet measurements of the interstellar absorption line profiles of the CIV (1550 A) high ionization doublet recorded towards the nearby B2Ve star HD 158427 (d~74pc). These data, which were recorded with the recently re-furbished STIS instrument on the HST, represent the most convincing detection yet of highly ionized CIV absorption that can be associated with interstellar gas located within the boundary of the Local Cavity. Two highly ionized gas clouds at V1 = -24.3 km/s and V2 = -41.3 km/s are revealed in both CIV absorption lines, with the V1 component almost certainly being due to absorption by the Local Interstellar Cloud (d<5pc). Although the observed column densities for both cloud components can be explained by the predictions of current theoretical models of the local interstellar medium, the narrow doppler width of the V2 line-profile (b = 6.8 km/s) indicates an unusually low gas temperature of less than 34,000K for this highly ionized component. It is conjectured that the V2 cloud may be due to an outflow of highly ionized and hot gas from the nearby Loop I superbubble. These new data also indicate that absorption due to highly ionized gas in the Local Cavity can be best described as being 'patchy' in nature.
  • We present new high resolution (R>50,000) absorption measurements of the NaI doublet (5889 - 5895A) along 482 nearby sight-lines, in addition to 807 new measurements of the CaII K (3933A) absorption line. We have combined these new data with previously reported measurements to produce a catalog of absorptions towards a total of 1857 early-type stars located within 800pc of the Sun. Using these data we have determined the approximate 3-dimensional spatial distribution of neutral and partly ionized interstellar gasdensity within a distance-cube of 300pc from the Sun. All newly recorded spectra were analyzed by means of a multi-component line profile-fitting program, in most cases using simultaneous fits to the line doublets. Normalized absorption profiles were fitted by varying the velocity, doppler width and column density for all intervening interstellar clouds. The resulting total column densities were then used in conjunction with the Hipparcos distances of the target stars to construct inversion maps of the 3-D spatial density distribution of the NaI and CaII bearing gas. A plot of the equivalent width of NaI versus distance reveals a wall of neutral gas at ~80pc that can be associated with the boundary wall to the central rarefied Local Cavity region. In contrast, a similar plot for the equivalent width of CaII shows no sharply increasing absorption at 80pc, but instead we observe a slowly increasing value of CaII equivalent width with increasing sight-line distance sampled.
  • The model of a Local Hot Bubble has been widely accepted as providing a framework that can explain the ubiquitous presence of the soft X-ray background diffuse emission. We summarize the current knowledge on this local interstellar region, paying particular reference to observations that sample emission from the presumed local million degree K hot plasma. However, we have listed numerous observations that are seemingly in conflict with the concept of a hot Local Bubble. In particular, the discovery of solar wind charge exchange that can generate an appreciable soft X-ray background signal within the heliosphere, has led to a reassessment of the generally accepted model that requires a hot local plasma. In order to explain the majority of observations of the local plasma, we forward two new speculative models that describe the physical state of the local interstellar gas. One possible scenario is similar to the present widely accepted model of the Local Hot Bubble, except that it accounts for only 50% of the soft X-ray emission currently detected in the galactic plane, has a lower thermal pressure than previously thought, and its hot plasma is not as hot as previously believed. Although such a model can solve several difficulties with the traditional hot Local Bubble model, a heating mechanism for the dimmer and cooler gas remains to be found. The second possible explanation is that of the Hot Top model, in which the Local Cavity is an old supernova remnant in which no (or very little) million degree local plasma is presently required. Instead, the cavity is now thought to be filled with partially ionized cloudlets of temperature 7000 K that are surrounded by lower density envelopes of photoionized gas of temperature 20,000 K.
  • We explore the age distribution of the globular cluster (GC) system of the nearby elliptical galaxy NGC 5128 using ultraviolet (UV) photometry from Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) observations, with UV - optical colors used as the age indicator. Most GCs in NGC 5128 follow the general trends of GCs in M31 and Milky Way in UV - optical color-color diagram, which indicates that the majority of GCs in NGC 5128 are old similar to the age range of old GCs in M31 and Milky Way. A large fraction of spectroscopically identified intermediate-age GC (IAGC) candidates with ~ 3-8 Gyr are not detected in the FUV passband. Considering the nature of intermediate-age populations being faint in the far-UV (FUV) passband, we suggest that many of the spectroscopically identified IAGCs may be truly intermediate in age. This is in contrast to the case of M31 where a large fraction of spectroscopically suggested IAGCs are detected in FUV and therefore may not be genuine IAGCs but rather older GCs with developed blue horizontal branch stars. Our UV photometry strengthens the results previously suggesting the presence of GC and stellar subpopulation with intermediate age in NGC 5128. The existence of IAGCs strongly indicates the occurrence of at least one more major star formation episode after a starburst at high redshift.
  • We explore the design of a space mission, Project Lyman, which has the goal of quantifying the ionization history of the universe from the present epoch to a redshift of z ~ 3. Observations from WMAP and SDSS show that before a redshift of z >~ 6 the first collapsed objects, possibly dwarf galaxies, emitted Lyman continuum (LyC) radiation shortward of 912 A, reionizing most of the universe. How LyC escapes from galactic environments, whether it induces positive or negative feedback on the local and global collapse of structures, and the role played by clumping, molecules, metallicity and dust are major unanswered theoretical questions, requiring observational constraint. Numerous intervening Lyman limit systems, which frustrate the detection of LyC from high z objects, thin below z ~ 3 where there are a few objects with apparently very high fesc. At low z there are only controversial detections and a handful of upper limits. A wide-field multi-object spectroscopic survey with moderate spectral and spatial resolution can quantify fesc within diverse spatially resolved galactic environments over redshifts with significant evolution in galaxy assemblage and quasar activity. It can also calibrate LyC escape against Ly-alpha escape, providing an essential tool to JWST for probing the beginnings of reionization. We present calculations showing the evolution of the characteristic apparent magnitude of star-forming galaxy luminosity functions at 900 A, as a function of redshift and assumed escape fraction to determine the required aperture for detecting LyC. We review our efforts to build a pathfinding dual order multi-object spectro/telescope with a (0.5deg)^2 field-of-view, using a GSFC microshutter array, and crossed delay-line micro-channel plate detector.
  • We present the second Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) Ultraviolet Variability (GUVV-2) Catalog that contains information on 410 newly discovered time-variable sources gained through simultaneous near (NUV 1750-2750A) and far (FUV 1350-1750A) ultraviolet photometric observations. Source variability was determined by comparing the NUV and/or FUV fluxes derived from orbital exposures recorded during a series of multiple observational visits to 169 GALEX fields on the sky. These sources, which were contained within a sky-area of 161 square deg, varied on average by amplitudes of NUV = 0.6 mag and FUV = 0.9 mag during these observations. Of the 114 variable sources in the catalog with previously known identifications, 67 can be categorized as being active galaxies (QSO's, Seyfert 1 or BL Lac objects). The next largest groups of UV variables are RR Lyrae stars, X-ray sources and novae. By using a combination of UV and visible color-color plots we have been able to tentatively identify 36 possible RR Lyrae and/or Delta Scuti type stars, as well as 35 probable AGN's, many of which may be previously unidentified QSO's or blazars. Finally, we show data for 3 particular variable objects: the contact binary system of SDSS J141818.97+525006.7, the eclipsing dwarf nova system of IY UMa and the highly variable unidentified source SDSS J104325.06+563258.1.
  • The GALEX (Galaxy Evolution Explorer) spectroscopic survey mode, with a resolution of about 8 A in the FUV (1350 - 1750 A) and about 20 A in the NUV (1950 - 2750 A) is used for a systematic search of Ly-a emitting galaxies at low redshift. This aims at filling a gap between high-redshift surveys and a small set of objects studied in detail in the nearby universe. A blind search of 7018 spectra extracted in 5 deep exposures (5.65 sq.deg) has resulted in 96 Ly-a emitting galaxy candidates in the FUV domain, after accounting for broad-line AGNs. The Ly-a EWs (equivalent width) are consistent with stellar population model predictions and show no trends as a function of UV color or UV luminosity, except a possible decrease in the most luminous that may be due to small-number statistics. Their distribution in EW is similar to that at z about 3 but their fraction among star-forming galaxies is smaller. Avoiding uncertain candidates, a sub-sample of 66 objects in the range 0.2 < z < 0.35 has been used to build a Ly-a LF (luminosity function). The incompleteness due to objects with significant Ly-a emission but a UV continuum too low for spectral extraction has been evaluated. A comparison with H-a LF in the same redshift domain is consistent with an average Ly-a/H-a of about 1 in about 15 % of the star-forming galaxies. A comparison with high-redshift Ly-a LFs implies an increase of the Ly-a luminosity density by a factor of about 16 from z about 0.3 to z about 3. By comparison with the factor 5 increase of the UV luminosity density in the same redshift range, this suggests an increase of the average Ly-a escape fraction with redshift.
  • We present high resolution (R ~ 4 km/s) absorption measurements of the interstellar NaI and CaII lines measured towards 14 early-type stars of distance 123 pc - 1650 pc, located in the direction of the Ara OB1 stellar cluster. The line profiles can broadly be split into four distinct groupings of absorption component velocity, and we have attempted to identify an origin and distance to each of these interstellar features. For gas with absorption covering the velocity range -10 km/s < V_helio < +10 km/s, we can identify the absorbing medium with local gas belonging to the Lupus-Norma interstellar cavity located between 100 and 485 pc in this galactic direction. Gas with velocities spanning the range -20 km/s < V_helio < +20 km/s is detected towards stars with distances of 570-800 pc. We identify a wide-spread interstellar feature at V_helio ~ -15 km/s with the expanding HI shell called GSH 337+00-05, which is now placed at a distance of ~530 pc.
  • We have initiated a search for extended ultraviolet disk (XUV-disk) galaxies in the local universe. Herein, we compare GALEX UV and visible--NIR images of 189 nearby (D$<$40 Mpc) S0--Sm galaxies included in the GALEX Atlas of Nearby Galaxies and present the first catalogue of XUV-disk galaxies. We find that XUV-disk galaxies are surprisingly common but have varied relative (UV/optical) extent and morphology. Type~1 objects ($\ga$20% incidence) have structured, UV-bright/optically-faint emission features in the outer disk, beyond the traditional star formation threshold. Type~2 XUV-disk galaxies ($\sim$10% incidence) exhibit an exceptionally large, UV-bright/optically-low-surface-brightness (LSB) zone having blue $UV-K_s$ outside the effective extent of the inner, older stellar population, but not reaching extreme galactocentric distance. If the activity occuring in XUV-disks is episodic, a higher fraction of present-day spirals could be influenced by such outer disk star formation. Type~1 disks are associated with spirals of all types, whereas Type~2 XUV-disks are predominantly found in late-type spirals. Type~2 XUV-disks are forming stars quickly enough to double their [presently low] stellar mass in the next Gyr (assuming a constant SF rate). XUV-disk galaxies of both types are systematically more gas-rich than the general galaxy population. Minor external perturbation may stimulate XUV-disk incidence, at least for Type~1 objects. XUV-disks are the most actively evolving galaxies growing via inside-out disk formation in the current epoch, and may constitute a segment of the galaxy population experiencing significant, continued gas accretion from the intergalactic medium or neighboring objects.
  • The meaningful comparison of models of galaxy evolution to observations is critically dependent on the accurate treatment of dust attenuation. To investigate dust absorption and emission in galaxies we have assembled a sample of ~1000 galaxies with ultraviolet (UV) through infrared (IR) photometry from GALEX, SDSS, and Spitzer and optical spectroscopy from SDSS. The ratio of IR to UV emission (IRX) is used to constrain the dust attenuation in galaxies. We use the 4000A break as a robust and useful, although coarse, indicator of star formation history (SFH). We examine the relationship between IRX and the UV spectral slope (a common attenuation indicator at high-redshift) and find little dependence of the scatter on 4000A break strength. We construct average UV through far-IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for different ranges of IRX, 4000A break strength, and stellar mass (M_*) to show the variation of the entire SED with these parameters. When binned simultaneously by IRX, 4000A break strength, and M_* these SEDs allow us to determine a low resolution average attenuation curve for different ranges of M_*. The attenuation curves thus derived are consistent with a lambda^{-0.7} attenuation law, and we find no significant variations with M_*. Finally, we show the relationship between IRX and the global stellar mass surface density and gas-phase-metallicity. Among star forming galaxies we find a strong correlation between IRX and stellar mass surface density, even at constant metallicity, a result that is closely linked to the well-known correlation between IRX and star-formation rate.
  • The color of galaxies is a fundamental property, easily measured, that constrains models of galaxies and their evolution. Dust attenuation and star formation history (SFH) are the dominant factors affecting the color of galaxies. Here we explore the empirical relation between SFH, attenuation, and color for a wide range of galaxies, including early types. These galaxies have been observed by GALEX, SDSS, and Spitzer, allowing the construction of measures of dust attenuation from the ratio of infrared (IR) to ultraviolet (UV) flux and measures of SFH from the strength of the 4000A break. The empirical relation between these three quantities is compared to models that separately predict the effects of dust and SFH on color. This comparison demonstrates the quantitative consistency of these simple models with the data and hints at the power of multiwavelength data for constraining these models. The UV color is a strong constraint; we find that a Milky Way extinction curve is disfavored, and that the UV emission of galaxies with large 4000A break strengths is likely to arise from evolved populations. We perform fits to the relation between SFH, attenuation, and color. This relation links the production of starlight and its absorption by dust to the subsequent reemission of the absorbed light in the IR. Galaxy models that self-consistently treat dust absorption and emission as well as stellar populations will need to reproduce these fitted relations in the low-redshift universe.
  • We use the UV-optical color magnitude diagram in combination with spectroscopic and photometric measurements derived from the SDSS spectroscopic sample to measure the distribution of galaxies in the local universe (z<0.25) and their physical properties as a function of specific star formation rate (SSFR) and stellar mass. Throughout this study our emphasis is on the properties of galaxies on and off of a local "star-forming sequence." We discuss how the physical characteristics of galaxies along this sequence are related to scaling relations typically derived for galaxies of different morphological types. We find, among other trends that our measure of the star formation rate surface density is nearly constant along this sequence. We discuss this result and implications for galaxies at higher redshift. For the first time, we report on measurements of the local UV luminosity function versus galaxy structural parameters as well as inclination. We also split our sample into disk-dominated and bulge-dominated subsamples using the i-band Sersic index and find that disk-dominated galaxies occupy a very tight locus in SSFR vs. stellar mass space while bulge-dominated galaxies display a much larger spread of SSFR at fixed stellar mass. A significant fraction of galaxies with SSFR and SF surface density above those on the "star-forming sequence" are bulge-dominated. We can use our derived distribution functions to ask whether a significant fraction of these galaxies may be experiencing a final episode of star formation (possibly induced by a merger or other burst), soon to be quenched, by determining whether this population can explain the growth rate of the non-star-forming galaxies on the "red sequence." (Abridged)
  • We report on the properties of a sample of ultraviolet luminous galaxies (UVLGs) selected by matching the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) Surveys with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Third Data Release. Out of 25362 galaxies between 0.0<z<0.3 detected by GALEX, there are 215 galaxies with L>2x10^10 L_solar at 1530 Angstroms (observed wavelength). The properties of this population are well correlated with ultraviolet surface brightness. We find that the galaxies with low UV surface brightness are primarily large spiral systems with a mixture of old and young stellar populations, while the high surface brightness galaxies consist primarily of compact starburst systems. In terms of the behavior of surface brightness with luminosity, size with luminosity, the mass-metallicity relation, and other parameters, the compact UVLGs clearly depart from the trends established by the full sample of galaxies. The subset of compact UVLGs with the highest surface brightness (``supercompact UVLGs'') have characteristics that are remarkably similar to Lyman Break Galaxies at higher redshift. They are much more luminous than typical local ultraviolet-bright starburst galaxies and blue compact dwarf galaxies. They have metallicities that are systematically lower than normal galaxies of the same stellar mass, indicating that they are less chemically evolved. In all these respects, they are the best local analogs for Lyman Break Galaxies.
  • We present the first measurements of the angular correlation function of galaxies selected in the far (1530 A) and near (2310 A) Ultraviolet from the GALEX survey fields overlapping SDSS DR5 in low galactic extinction regions. The area used covers 120 sqdeg (GALEX - MIS) down to magnitude AB = 22, yielding a total of 100,000 galaxies. The mean correlation length is ~ 3.7 \pm 0.6 Mpc and no significant trend is seen for this value as a function of the limiting apparent magnitude or between the GALEX bands. This estimate is close to that found from samples of blue galaxies in the local universe selected in the visible, and similar to that derived at z ~ 3 for LBGs with similar rest frame selection criteria. This result supports models that predict anti-biasing of star forming galaxies at low redshift, and brings an additional clue to the downsizing of star formation at z<1.
  • We use a new stacking technique to obtain mean mid IR and far IR to far UV flux ratios over the rest near-UV/near-IR color-magnitude diagram. We employ COMBO-17 redshifts and COMBO-17 optical, GALEX far and near UV, Spitzer IRAC and MIPS Mid IR photometry. This technique permits us to probe infrared excess (IRX), the ratio of far IR to far UV luminosity, and specific star formation rate (SSFR) and their co-evolution over two orders of magnitude of stellar mass and redshift 0.1<z<1.2. We find that the SSFR and the characteristic mass (M_0) above which the SSFR drops increase with redshift (downsizing). At any given epoch, IRX is an increasing function of mass up to M_0. Above this mass IRX falls, suggesting gas exhaustion. In a given mass bin below M_0 IRX increases with time in a fashion consistent with enrichment. We interpret these trends using a simple model with a Schmidt-Kennicutt law and extinction that tracks gas density and enrichment. We find that the average IRX and SSFR follows a galaxy age parameter which is determined mainly by the galaxy mass and time since formation. We conclude that blue sequence galaxies have properties which show simple, systematic trends with mass and time such as the steady build-up of heavy elements in the interstellar media of evolving galaxies and the exhaustion of gas in galaxies that are evolving off the blue sequence. The IRX represents a tool for selecting galaxies at various stages of evolution.
  • Using a sample of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic catalog with measured star-formation rates (SFRs) and ultraviolet (UV) photometry from the GALEX Medium Imaging Survey, we derived empirical linear correlations between the SFR to UV luminosity ratio and the UV-optical colors of blue sequence galaxies. The relations provide a simple prescription to correct UV data for dust attenuation that best reconciles the SFRs derived from UV and emission line data. The method breaks down for the red sequence population as well as for very blue galaxies such as the local ``supercompact'' UV luminous galaxies and the majority of high redshift Lyman Break Galaxies which form a low attenuation sequence of their own.
  • We investigate the production of nitrogen in star forming galaxies with ultraviolet (UV) radiation detected by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer Satellite (GALEX). We use a sample of 8,745 GALEX emission line galaxies matched to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic sample. We derive both gas-phase oxygen and nitrogen abundances for the sample, and apply stellar population synthesis models to derive stellar masses and star formation histories of the galaxies. We compare oxygen abundances derived using three different diagnostics. We derive the specific star formation rates of the galaxies by modeling the 7-band GALEX+SDSS photometry. We find that galaxies that have log SFR/M$_*$ > -10.0 typically have values of log N/O ~0.05 dex less than galaxies with log SFR/M$_*$ < -10.0 and similar oxygen abundances.
  • We report results from a pilot program to obtain spectroscopy for objects detected in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) Medium Imaging Survey (MIS). Our study examines the properties of galaxies detected by GALEX fainter than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic survey. This is the first study to extend the techinques of Salim et al. 2005 to estimate stellar masses, star formation rates (SFR) and the b (star formation history) parameter for star-forming galaxies out to z~0.7. We obtain redshifts for 50 GALEX MIS sources reaching NUV=23.9 (AB mag), having counterparts in the SDSS Data Release 4 (DR4). Of our sample, 43 are starforming galaxies with z<0.7, 3 have emission line ratios indicative of AGN with z<0.7, and 4 objects with z~1 are QSOs, 3 of which are not previously cataloged. We compare our sample to a much larger sample of ~50,000 matched GALEX/SDSS galaxies with SDSS spectroscopy; while our survey is shallow, the optical counterparts to our sources reach ~3 magnitudes fainter in SDSS r magnitude than the SDSS spectroscopic sample. We use emission line diagnostics for the galaxies to determine that the sample contains mostly star-forming galaxies. The galaxies in the sample populate the blue sequence in the NUV-r vs M_r color-magnitude diagram. Our sample has SFRs, luminosities, and velocity dispersions that are similar to the samples of faint compact blue galaxies studied previously in the same redshift range by Koo et. al 1995, Guzman et. al 1996 & Phillips et. al 1997. However, our sample is ~2 mag fainter in surface brightness than the compact blue galaxies. We find that the star-formation histories for a majority of the galaxies are consistent with a recent starburst within the last 100 Myr.
  • We analyze the clustering properties of ultraviolet selected galaxies by using GALEX-SDSS data at z<0.6 and CFHTLS deep u' imaging at z=1. These datasets provide a unique basis at z< 1 which can be directly compared with high redshift samples built with similar selection criteria. We discuss the dependence of the correlation function parameters (r0, delta) on the ultraviolet luminosity as well as the linear bias evolution. We find that the bias parameter shows a gradual decline from high (b > 2) to low redshift (b ~ 0.79^{+0.1}_{-0.08}). When accounting for the fraction of the star formation activity enclosed in the different samples, our results suggest that the bulk of star formation migrated from high mass dark matter halos at z>2 (10^12 < M_min < 10^13 M_sun, located in high density regions), to less massive halos at low redshift (M_min < 10^12 M_sun, located in low density regions). This result extends the ``downsizing'' picture (shift of the star formation activity from high stellar mass systems at high z to low stellar mass at low z) to the dark matter distribution.
  • We describe the calibration status and data products pertaining to the GR2 and GR3 data releases of the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). These releases have identical pipeline calibrations that are significantly improved over the GR1 data release. GALEX continues to survey the sky in the Far Ultraviolet (FUV, ~154 nm) and Near Ultraviolet (NUV, ~232 nm) bands, providing simultaneous imaging with a pair of photon counting, microchannel plate, delay line readout detectors. These 1.25 degree field-of-view detectors are well-suited to ultraviolet observations because of their excellent red rejection and negligible background. A dithered mode of observing and photon list output pose complex requirements on the data processing pipeline, entangling detector calibrations and aspect reconstruction algorithms. Recent improvements have achieved photometric repeatability of 0.05 and 0.03 mAB in the FUV and NUV, respectively. We have detected a long term drift of order 1% FUV and 6% NUV over the mission. Astrometric precision is of order 0.5" RMS in both bands. In this paper we provide the GALEX user with a broad overview of the calibration issues likely to be confronted in the current release. Improvements are likely as the GALEX mission continues into an extended phase with a healthy instrument, no consumables, and increased opportunities for guest investigations.