• Angular momentum balance is examined in the context of the electrodynamics of a spinning hollow sphere of charge, which is allowed to possess any variable angular velocity. We calculate the electric and magnetic fields of the sphere, and express them as expansions in powers of $\tau/t_c \ll 1$, the ratio of the light-travel time $\tau$ across the sphere and the characteristic time scale $t_c$ of variation of the angular velocity. From the fields we compute the self-torque exerted by the fields on the sphere, and argue that only a piece of this self-torque can be associated with radiation reaction. Then we obtain the rate at which angular momentum is radiated away by the shell, and the total angular momentum contained in the electromagnetic field. With these results we demonstrate explicitly that the field angular momentum is lost in part to radiation and in part to the self-torque; angular momentum balance is thereby established. Finally, we examine the angular motion of the sphere under the combined action of the self-torque and an additional torque supplied by an external agent.
  • Somewhat surprisingly, in many of the widely used monographs and review articles the term Transverse-Traceless modes of linearized gravitational waves is used to denote two entirely different notions. These treatments generally begin with a decomposition of the metric perturbation that is local in the momentum space (and hence non-local in physical space), and denote the resulting transverse traceless modes by $h_{ab}^{\TT}$. However, while discussing gravitational waves emitted by an isolated system --typically in a later section-- the relevant modes are extracted using a `projection operator' that is local in physical space. These modes are also called transverse-traceless and again labeled $h_{ab}^{\TT}$, implying that this is just a reformulation of the previous notion. But the two notions are conceptually distinct and the difference persists even in the asymptotic region. We show that this confusion arises already in Maxwell theory that is often discussed as a prelude to the gravitational case. Finally, we discuss why the distinction has nonetheless remained largely unnoticed, and also point out that there are some important physical effects where only one of the notions gives the correct answer.
  • In much of the literature on linearized gravitational waves two completely different notions are called transverse traceless modes and labelled $h_{ab}^{TT}$, often in different sections of the same reference, without realizing the underlying inconsistency. We compare and contrast the two notions and find that the difference persists even at leading asymptotic order near future null infinity $\mathit{I}^+$. We discuss why the distinction has nonetheless remained largely unnoticed, and also point out that there are some important physical effects where only one of the notions gives the correct answer.
  • Gravitational waves emitted by high redshift sources propagate through various epochs of the Universe including the current era of measurable, accelerated expansion. Historically, the calculation of gravitational wave power on cosmological backgrounds is based on various simplifications, including a $1/r$-expansion and the use of an algebraic projection to retrieve the radiative degrees of freedom. On a de Sitter spacetime, recent work has demonstrated that many of these calculational techniques and approximations do not apply. Here we calculate the power emitted by a binary system on a de Sitter background using techniques tailored to de Sitter spacetime. The common expression for the power radiated by this source in an FLRW spacetime, calculated using far wave-zone techniques, gives the same expression as the late time expansion specialized to the de Sitter background in the high-frequency approximation.
  • In a recent paper [17], we studied the evolution of the background geometry and scalar perturbations in an inflationary, spatially closed Friedmann-Lema\^itre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) model having constant positive spatial curvature and spatial topology $\mathbb S^3$. Due to the spatial curvature, the early phase of slow-roll inflation is modified, leading to suppression of power in the scalar power spectrum at large angular scales. In this paper, we extend the analysis to include tensor perturbations. We find that --- similarly to the scalar perturbations --- the tensor power spectrum also shows power suppression for long wavelength modes. The correction to the tensor spectrum is limited to the very long wavelength modes, therefore the resulting observable CMB B-mode polarization spectrum remains practically the same as in the standard scenario with flat spatial sections. However, since both the tensor and scalar power spectra are modified, there are scale dependent corrections to the tensor-to-scalar ratio that lead to violation of the standard slow-roll consistency relation.
  • Recent cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations put strong constraints on the spatial curvature via estimation of the parameter $\Omega_k$ assuming an almost scale invariant primordial power spectrum. We study the evolution of the background geometry and gauge-invariant scalar perturbations in an inflationary closed FLRW model and calculate the primordial power spectrum. We find that the inflationary dynamics is modified due to the presence of spatial curvature, leading to corrections to the nearly scale invariant power spectrum at the end of inflation. When evolved to the surface of last scattering, the resulting temperature anisotropy spectrum ($C_{\ell}^{TT}$) shows deficit of power at low multipoles ($\ell<20$). By comparing our results with the recent Planck data we discuss the role of spatial curvature in accounting for CMB anomalies and in the estimation of the parameter $\Omega_k$. Since the curvature effects are limited to low multipoles, the Planck estimation of cosmological parameters remains robust under inclusion of positive spatial curvature.
  • A self-consistent pre-inflationary extension of the inflationary scenario with the Starobinsky potential, favored by Planck data, is studied using techniques from loop quantum cosmology (LQC). The results are compared with the quadratic potential previously studied. Planck scale completion of the inflationary paradigm and observable signatures of LQC are found to be robust under the change of the inflaton potential. The entire evolution, from the quantum bounce all the way to the end of inflation, is compatible with observations. Occurrence of desired slow-roll phase is almost inevitable and natural initial conditions exist for both the background and perturbations for which the resulting power spectrum agrees with recent observations. There exist initial data for which the quantum gravitational corrections to the power spectrum are potentially observable.
  • We examine the squeezed limit of the bispectrum when a light scalar with arbitrary non-derivative self-interactions is coupled to the inflaton. We find that when the hidden sector scalar is sufficiently light ($m\lesssim0.1\,H$), the coupling between long and short wavelength modes from the series of higher order correlation functions (from arbitrary order contact diagrams) causes the statistics of the fluctuations to vary in sub-volumes. This means that observations of primordial non-Gaussianity cannot be used to uniquely reconstruct the potential of the hidden field. However, the local bispectrum induced by mode-coupling from these diagrams always has the same squeezed limit, so the field's locally determined mass is not affected by this cosmic variance.
  • We investigate the pre-inflationary dynamics of inflation with the Starobinsky potential, favored by recent data from the Planck mission, using techniques developed to study cosmological perturbations on quantum spacetimes in the framework of loop quantum cosmology. We find that for a large part of the initial data, inflation compatible with observations occurs. There exists a subset of this initial data that leads to quantum gravity signatures that are potentially observable. Interestingly, despite the different inflationary dynamics, these quantum gravity corrections to the powerspectra are similar to those obtained for inflation with a quadratic potential, including suppression of power at large scales. Furthermore, for super horizon modes the tensor modes show deviations from the standard inflationary paradigm that are unique to the Starobinsky potential and could be important for non-Gaussian modulation and tensor fossils.
  • There is a deep tension between the well-developed theory of gravitational waves from isolated systems and the presence of a positive cosmological constant $\Lambda$, however tiny. In particular, even the post-Newtonian quadrupole formula, derived by Einstein in 1918, has not been generalized to include a positive $\Lambda$. We first explain the principal difficulties and then show that it is possible to overcome them in the weak field limit. These results also provide concrete hints for constructing the $\Lambda >0$ generalization of the Bondi-Sachs framework for full, non-linear general relativity.
  • Almost a century ago, Einstein used a weak field approximation around Minkowski space-time to calculate the energy carried away by gravitational waves emitted by a time changing mass-quadrupole. However, by now there is strong observational evidence for a positive cosmological constant, $\Lambda$. To incorporate this fact, Einstein's celebrated derivation is generalized by replacing Minkowski space-time with de Sitter space-time. The investigation is motivated by the fact that, because of the significant differences between the asymptotic structures of Minkowski and de Sitter space-times, many of the standard techniques, including the standard $1/r$ expansions, can not be used for $\Lambda >0$. Furthermore since, e.g., the energy carried by gravitational waves is always positive in Minkowski space-time but can be arbitrarily negative in de Sitter space-time \emph{irrespective of how small $\Lambda$ is}, the limit $\Lambda\to 0$ can fail to be continuous. Therefore, a priori it is not clear that a small $\Lambda$ would introduce only negligible corrections to Einstein's formula. We show that, while even a tiny cosmological constant does introduce qualitatively new features, in the end, corrections to Einstein's formula are negligible for astrophysical sources currently under consideration by gravitational wave observatories.
  • Linearized gravitational waves in de Sitter space-time are analyzed in detail to obtain guidance for constructing the theory of gravitational radiation in presence of a positive cosmological constant in full, nonlinear general relativity. Specifically: i) In the exact theory, the intrinsic geometry of $\scri$ is often assumed to be conformally flat in order to reduce the asymptotic symmetry group from $\Diff$ to the de Sitter group. Our {results show explicitly} that this condition is physically unreasonable; ii) We obtain expressions of energy-momentum and angular momentum fluxes carried by gravitational waves in terms of fields defined at $\scrip$; iii) We argue that, although energy of linearized gravitational waves can be arbitrarily negative in general, gravitational waves emitted by physically reasonable sources carry positive energy; and, finally iv) We demonstrate that the flux formulas reduce to the familiar ones in Minkowski space-time in spite of the fact that the limit $\Lambda \to 0$ is discontinuous (since, in particular, $\scri$ changes its space-like character to null in the limit).
  • The asymptotic structure of the gravitational field of isolated systems has been analyzed in great detail in the case when the cosmological constant $\Lambda$ is zero. The resulting framework lies at the foundation of research in diverse areas in gravitational science. Examples include: i) positive energy theorems in geometric analysis; ii) the coordinate invariant characterization of gravitational waves in full, non-linear general relativity; iii) computations of the energy-momentum emission in gravitational collapse and binary mergers in numerical relativity and relativistic astrophysics; and iv) constructions of asymptotic Hilbert spaces to calculate $S$-matrices and analyze the issue of information loss in the quantum evaporation of black holes. However, by now observations have established that $\Lambda$ is positive in our universe. In this paper we show that, unfortunately, the standard framework does not extend from the $\Lambda =0$ case to the $\Lambda >0$ case in a physically useful manner. In particular, we do not have positive energy theorems, nor an invariant notion of gravitational waves in the non-linear regime, nor asymptotic Hilbert spaces in dynamical situations of semi-classical gravity. A suitable framework to address these conceptual issues of direct physical importance is developed in subsequent papers.
  • A clock synchronization thought experiment is modeled by a diffeomorphism invariant "time delay" observable. In a sense, this observable probes the causal structure of the ambient Lorentzian spacetime. Thus, upon quantization, it is sensitive to the long expected smearing of the light cone by vacuum fluctuations in quantum gravity. After perturbative linearization, its mean and variance are computed in the Minkowski Fock vacuum of linearized gravity. The na\"ive divergence of the variance is meaningfully regularized by a length scale $\mu$, the physical detector resolution. This is the first time vacuum fluctuations have been fully taken into account in a similar calculation. Despite some drawbacks this calculation provides a useful template for the study of a large class of similar observables in quantum gravity. Due to their large volume, intermediate calculations were performed using computer algebra software. The resulting variance scales like $(s \ell_p/\mu)^2$, where $\ell_p$ is the Planck length and $s$ is the distance scale separating the ("lab" and "probe") clocks. Additionally, the variance depends on the relative velocity of the lab and the probe, diverging for low velocities. This puzzling behavior may be due to an oversimplified detector resolution model or a neglected second order term in the time delay.