• Realistic depictions of past land cover are needed to investigate prehistoric environmental changes, effects of anthropogenic deforestation, and long term land cover-climate feedbacks. Observation based reconstructions of past land cover are rare and commonly used model based reconstructions exhibit considerable differences. Recently \citet[Spatial Statistics, 24:14--31,][]{PirzaLPG2018_24} developed a statistical interpolation method that produces spatially complete reconstructions of past land cover from pollen assemblage. These reconstructions incorporate a number of auxiliary datasets raising questions regarding the method's sensitivity to different auxiliary datasets. Here the sensitivity of the method is examined by performing spatial reconstructions for northern Europe during three time periods (1900 CE, 1725 CE and 4000 BCE). The auxiliary datasets considered include the most commonly utilized sources of past land-cover data --- e.g.\ estimates produced by a dynamic vegetation (DVM) and anthropogenic land-cover change (ALCC) models. Five different auxiliary datasets were considered, including different climate data driving the DVM and different ALCC models. The resulting reconstructions were also evaluated using cross-validation for all the time periods. For the recent time period, 1900 CE, the different land-cover reconstructions were compared against a present day forest map. The validation confirms that the statistical model provides a robust spatial interpolation tool with low sensitivity to differences in auxiliary data and high capacity to capture information in the pollen based proxy data. Further auxiliary data with high spatial detail improves model performance for areas with complex topography or few observations.
  • In this paper, we construct a hierarchical model for spatial compositional data, which is used to reconstruct past land-cover compositions (in terms of coniferous forest, broadleaved forest, and unforested/open land) for five time periods during the past $6\,000$ years over Europe. The model consists of a Gaussian Markov Random Field (GMRF) with Dirichlet observations. A block updated Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), including an adaptive Metropolis adjusted Langevin step, is used to estimate model parameters. The sparse precision matrix in the GMRF provides computational advantages leading to a fast MCMC algorithm. Reconstructions are obtained by combining pollen-based estimates of vegetation cover at a limited number of locations with scenarios of past deforestation and output from a dynamic vegetation model. To evaluate uncertainties in the predictions a novel way of constructing joint confidence regions for the entire composition at each prediction location is proposed. The hierarchical model's ability to reconstruct past land cover is evaluated through cross validation for all time periods, and by comparing reconstructions for the recent past to a present day European forest map. The evaluation results are promising and the model is able to capture known structures in past land-cover compositions.