• The search for exotic quantum spin liquid states in simple yet realistic spin models remains a central challenge in the field of frustrated quantum magnetism. Here we consider the canonical nearest-neighbor kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet restricted to a quasi-1D strip consisting entirely of corner-sharing triangles. Using large-scale density matrix renormalization group calculations, we identify in this model an extended gapless quantum phase characterized by central charge $c=2$ and power-law decaying spin and bond-energy correlations which oscillate at tunably incommensurate wave vectors. We argue that this intriguing spin liquid phase can be understood as a marginal instability of a two-band spinon Fermi surface coupled to an emergent U(1) gauge field, an interpretation which we substantiate via bosonization analysis and Monte Carlo calculations on model Gutzwiller variational wave functions. Our results represent one of the first numerical demonstrations of emergent fermionic spinons in a simple SU(2) invariant nearest-neighbor Heisenberg model beyond the strictly 1D (Bethe chain) limit.
  • We study the dynamics of Majorana zero modes that are shuttled via local tuning of the electrochemical potential in a superconducting wire. By performing time-dependent simulations of microscopic lattice models, we show that diabatic corrections associated with the moving Majorana modes are quantitatively captured by a simple Landau-Zener description. We further simulate a Rabi-oscillation protocol in a specific qubit design with four Majorana zero modes in a single wire and quantify constraints on the timescales for performing qubit operations in this setup. Our simulations utilize a Majorana representation of the system, which greatly simplifies simulations of superconductors at the mean-field level.
  • We study the effect of gate-induced electric fields on the properties of semiconductor-superconductor hybrid nanowires which represent a promising platform for realizing topological superconductivity and Majorana zero modes. Using a self-consistent Schr\"odinger-Poisson approach that describes the semiconductor and the superconductor on equal footing, we are able to access the strong tunneling regime and identify the impact of an applied gate voltage on the coupling between semiconductor and superconductor. We discuss how physical parameters such as the induced superconducting gap and Land\'e g-factor in the semiconductor are modified by redistributing the density of states across the interface upon application of an external gate voltage. Finally, we map out the topological phase diagram as a function of magnetic field and gate voltage for InAs/Al nanowires.
  • Tensor networks impose a notion of geometry on the entanglement of a quantum system. In some cases, this geometry is found to reproduce key properties of holographic dualities, and subsequently much work has focused on using tensor networks as tractable models for holographic dualities. Conventionally, the structure of the network - and hence the geometry - is largely fixed a priori by the choice of tensor network ansatz. Here, we evade this restriction and describe an unbiased approach that allows us to extract the appropriate geometry from a given quantum state. We develop an algorithm that iteratively finds a unitary circuit that transforms a given quantum state into an unentangled product state. We then analyze the structure of the resulting unitary circuits. In the case of non-interacting, critical systems in one dimension, we recover signatures of scale invariance in the unitary network, and we show that appropriately defined geodesic paths between physical degrees of freedom exhibit known properties of a hyperbolic geometry.
  • In a periodically driven (Floquet) system, there is the possibility for new phases of matter, not present in stationary systems, protected by discrete time-translation symmetry. This includes topological phases protected in part by time-translation symmetry, as well as phases distinguished by the spontaneous breaking of this symmetry, dubbed "Floquet time crystals". We show that such phases of matter can exist in the pre-thermal regime of periodically-driven systems, which exists generically for sufficiently large drive frequency, thereby eliminating the need for integrability or strong quenched disorder that limited previous constructions. We prove a theorem that states that such a pre-thermal regime persists until times that are nearly exponentially-long in the ratio of certain couplings to the drive frequency. By similar techniques, we can also construct stationary systems which spontaneously break *continuous* time-translation symmetry. We argue furthermore that for driven systems coupled to a cold bath, the pre-thermal regime could potentially persist to infinite time.
  • Recent improvements in control of quantum systems make it seem feasible to finally build a quantum computer within a decade. While it has been shown that such a quantum computer can in principle solve certain small electronic structure problems and idealized model Hamiltonians, the highly relevant problem of directly solving a complex correlated material appears to require a prohibitive amount of resources. Here, we show that by using a hybrid quantum-classical algorithm that incorporates the power of a small quantum computer into a framework of classical embedding algorithms, the electronic structure of complex correlated materials can be efficiently tackled using a quantum computer. In our approach, the quantum computer solves a small effective quantum impurity problem that is self-consistently determined via a feedback loop between the quantum and classical computation. Use of a quantum computer enables much larger and more accurate simulations than with any known classical algorithm, and will allow many open questions in quantum materials to be resolved once a small quantum computer with around one hundred logical qubits becomes available.
  • Dimer models have long been a fruitful playground for understanding topological physics. Here we introduce a new class - termed Majorana-dimer models - wherein bosonic dimers are decorated with pairs of Majorana modes. We find that the simplest examples of such systems realize an intriguing, intrinsically fermionic phase of matter that can be viewed as the product of a chiral Ising theory, which hosts deconfined non-Abelian quasiparticles, and a topological $p_x - ip_y$ superconductor. While the bulk anyons are described by a single copy of the Ising theory, the edge remains fully gapped. Consequently, this phase can arise in exactly solvable, frustration-free models. We describe two parent Hamiltonians: one generalizes the well-known dimer model on the triangular lattice, while the other is most naturally understood as a model of decorated fluctuating loops on a honeycomb lattice. Using modular transformations, we show that the ground-state manifold of the latter model unambiguously exhibits all properties of the $\text{Ising} \times (p_x-ip_y)$ theory. We also discuss generalizations with more than one Majorana mode per site, which realize phases related to Kitaev's 16-fold way in a similar fashion.
  • We define what it means for time translation symmetry to be spontaneously broken in a quantum system, and show with analytical arguments and numerical simulations that this occurs in a large class of many-body-localized driven systems with discrete time-translation symmetry.
  • Semiconductor-superconductor heterostructures represent a promising platform for the detection of Majorana zero modes and subsequently the processing of quantum information using their exotic non-Abelian statistics. Theoretical modeling of such low-dimensional semiconductors is generally based on phenomenological effective models. However, a more microscopic understanding of their band structure and, especially, of the spin-orbit coupling of electrons in these devices is important for optimizing their parameters for applications in quantum computing. In this paper, we approach this problem by first obtaining a highly accurate effective tight-binding model from ab initio calculations in the bulk. This model is symmetrized and correctly reproduces both the band structure and the wavefunction character. It is then used to determine Dresselhaus and Rashba spin-orbit splittings induced by finite size effects and external electric field in zincblende InSb one- and two-dimensional nanostructures as a function of growth parameters. The method presented here enables reliable simulations of realistic devices, including those used to realize exotic topological states.
  • In the presence of strong disorder and weak interactions, closed quantum systems can enter a many-body localized phase where the system does not conduct, does not equilibrate even for arbitrarily long times, and robustly violates quantum statistical mechanics. The starting point for such a many-body localized phase is usually taken to be an Anderson insulator where, in the limit of vanishing interactions, all degrees of freedom of the system are localized. Here, we instead consider a model where in the non-interacting limit, some degrees of freedom are localized while others remain delocalized. Such a system can be viewed as a model for a many-body localized system brought into contact with a small bath of a comparable number of degrees of freedom. We numerically and analytically study the effect of interactions on this system and find that generically, the entire system delocalizes. However, we find certain parameter regimes where results are consistent with localization of the entire system, an effect recently termed many-body proximity effect.
  • Hubbard ladders are an important stepping stone to the physics of the two-dimensional Hubbard model. While many of their properties are accessible to numerical and analytical techniques, the question of whether weakly hole-doped Hubbard ladders are dominated by superconducting or charge-density-wave correlations has so far eluded a definitive answer. In particular, previous numerical simulations of Hubbard ladders have seen a much faster decay of superconducting correlations than expected based on analytical arguments. We revisit this question using a state-of-the-art implementation of the density matrix renormalization group algorithm that allows us to simulate larger system sizes with higher accuracy than before. Performing careful extrapolations of the results, we obtain improved estimates for the Luttinger liquid parameter and the correlation functions at long distances. Our results confirm that, as suggested by analytical considerations, superconducting correlations become dominant in the limit of very small doping.
  • Strongly correlated analogues of topological insulators have been explored in systems with purely on-site symmetries, such as time-reversal or charge conservation. Here, we use recently developed tensor network tools to study a quantum state of interacting bosons which is featureless in the bulk, but distinguished from an atomic insulator in that it exhibits entanglement which is protected by its spatial symmetries. These properties are encoded in a model many-body wavefunction that describes a fully symmetric insulator of bosons on the honeycomb lattice at half filling per site. While the resulting integer unit cell filling allows the state to bypass `no-go' theorems that trigger fractionalization at fractional filling, it nevertheless has nontrivial entanglement, protected by symmetry. We demonstrate this by computing the boundary entanglement spectra, finding a gapless entanglement edge described by a conformal field theory as well as degeneracies protected by the non-trivial action of combined charge-conservation and spatial symmetries on the edge. Here, the tight-binding representation of the space group symmetries plays a particular role in allowing certain entanglement cuts that are not allowed on other lattices of the same symmetry, suggesting that the lattice representation can serve as an additional symmetry ingredient in protecting an interacting topological phase. Our results extend to a related insulating state of electrons, with short-ranged entanglement and no band insulator analogue.
  • We examine a class of operations for topological quantum computation based on fusing and measuring topological charges for systems with SU$(2)_4$ or $k=4$ Jones-Kauffman anyons. We show that such operations augment the braiding operations, which, by themselves, are not computationally universal. This augmentation results in a computationally universal gate set through the generation of an exact, topologically protected irrational phase gate and an approximate, topologically protected controlled-$Z$ gate.
  • The Heisenberg-Kitaev (HK) model on the triangular lattice is conceptually interesting for its interplay of geometric and exchange frustration. HK models are also thought to capture the essential physics of the spin-orbital entanglement in effective $j=1/2$ Mott insulators studied in the context of various 5d transition metal oxides. Here we argue that the recently synthesized Ba$_3$IrTi$_2$O$_9$ is a prime candidate for a microscopic realization of the triangular HK model. We establish that an infinitesimal Kitaev exchange destabilizes the 120$^\circ$ order of the quantum Heisenberg model and results in the formation of an extended $\mathbb{Z}_2$-vortex crystal phase in the parameter regime most likely relevant to the real material. Using a combination of analytical and numerical techniques we map out the entire phase diagram of the model, which further includes various ordered phases as well as an extended nematic phase around the antiferromagnetic Kitaev point.
  • In the quest to reach lower temperatures of ultra-cold gases in optical lattice experiments, non-adiabaticites during lattice loading are one of the limiting factors that prevent the same low temperatures to be reached as in experiments without lattice. Simulating the loading of a bosonic quantum gas into a one-dimensional optical lattice with and without a trap, we find that the redistribution of atomic density inside a global confining potential is by far the dominant source of heating. Based on these results we propose to adjust the trapping potential during loading to minimize changes to the density distribution. Our simulations confirm that a very simple linear interpolation of the trapping potential during loading already significantly decreases the heating of a quantum gas and we discuss how loading protocols minimizing density redistributions can be designed.
  • We explore the role of entanglement in adiabatic quantum optimization by performing approximate simulations of the real-time evolution of a quantum system while limiting the amount of entanglement. To classically simulate the time evolution of the system with a limited amount of entanglement, we represent the quantum state using matrix-product states and projected entangled-pair states. We show that the probability of finding the ground state of an Ising spin glass on either a planar or non-planar two-dimensional graph increases rapidly as the amount of entanglement in the state is increased. Furthermore, we propose evolution in complex time as a way to improve simulated adiabatic evolution and mimic the effects of thermal cooling of the quantum annealer.
  • Many-body localization, the persistence against electron-electron interactions of the localization of states with non-zero excitation energy density, poses a challenge to current methods of theoretical and numerical analysis. Numerical simulations have so far been limited to a small number of sites, making it difficult to obtain reliable statements about the thermodynamic limit. In this paper, we explore the ways in which a relatively small quantum computer could be leveraged to study many-body localization. We show that, in addition to studying time-evolution, a quantum computer can, in polynomial time, obtain eigenstates at arbitrary energies to sufficient accuracy that localization can be observed. The limitations of quantum measurement, which preclude the possibility of directly obtaining the entanglement entropy, make it difficult to apply some of the definitions of many-body localization used in the recent literature. We discuss alternative tests of localization that can be implemented on a quantum computer.
  • The density-matrix renormalization group method has become a standard computational approach to the low-energy physics as well as dynamics of low-dimensional quantum systems. In this paper, we present a new set of applications, available as part of the ALPS package, that provide an efficient and flexible implementation of these methods based on a matrix-product state (MPS) representation. Our applications implement, within the same framework, algorithms to variationally find the ground state and low-lying excited states as well as simulate the time evolution of arbitrary one-dimensional and two-dimensional models. Implementing the conservation of quantum numbers for generic Abelian symmetries, we achieve performance competitive with the best codes in the community. Example results are provided for (i) a model of itinerant fermions in one dimension and (ii) a model of quantum magnetism.
  • We study the properties of a quantum dot coupled to a one-dimensional topological superconductor and a normal lead and discuss the interplay between Kondo and Majorana-induced couplings in quantum dot. The latter appears due to the presence of Majorana zero-energy modes localized at the ends of the one-dimensional superconductor. We investigate the phase diagram of the system as a function of Kondo and Majorana interactions using a renormalization-group analysis, a slave-boson mean-field theory and numerical simulations using the density-matrix renormalization group method. We show that, in addition to the well-known Kondo fixed point, the system may flow to a new fixed point controlled by the Majorana-induced coupling which is characterized by non-trivial correlations between a localized spin on the dot and the fermion parity of the topological superconductor and normal lead. We compute several measurable quantities such as differential tunneling conductance and impurity spin susceptibility which highlight some peculiar features characteristic to the Majorana fixed point.
  • We argue that a relatively simple model containing only SU(2)-invariant chiral three-spin interactions on a Kagome lattice of S=1/2 spins can give rise to both a gapped and a gapless quantum spin liquid. Our arguments are rooted in a formulation in terms of network models of edge states and are backed up by a careful numerical analysis. For a uniform choice of chirality on the lattice, we realize the Kalmeyer-Laughlin state, i.e. a gapped spin liquid which is identified as the nu=1/2 bosonic Laughlin state. For staggered chiralities, a gapless spin liquid emerges which exhibits gapless spin excitations along lines in momentum space, a feature that we probe by studying quasi-two-dimensional systems of finite width. We thus provide a single, appealingly simple spin model (i) for what is probably the simplest realization of the Kalmeyer-Laughlin state to date, as well as (ii) for a non-Fermi liquid state with lines of gapless SU(2) spin excitations.
  • We theoretically obtain the phase diagram of localized magnetic impurity spins arranged in a one-dimensional chain on top of a one- or two-dimensional electron gas with Rashba spin-orbit coupling. The interactions between the spins are mediated by the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) mechanism through the electron gas. Recent work predicts that such a system may intrinsically support topological superconductivity when a helical spin-density wave is formed in the spins, and superconductivity is induced in the electron gas. We analyze, using both analytical and numerical techniques, the conditions under which such a helical spin state is stable in a realistic situation in the presence of disorder. We show that it becomes unstable towards the formation of (anti) ferromagnetic domains if the disorder in the impurity spin positions $\delta R$ becomes comparable with the Fermi wave length. We also examine the stability of the helical state against Gaussian potential disorder in the electronic system using a diagrammatic approach. Our results suggest that in order to stabilize the helical spin state, and thus the emergent topological superconductivity, a sufficiently strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling, giving rise to Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions, is required.
  • As quantum computing technology improves and quantum computers with a small but non-trivial number of N > 100 qubits appear feasible in the near future the question of possible applications of small quantum computers gains importance. One frequently mentioned application is Feynman's original proposal of simulating quantum systems, and in particular the electronic structure of molecules and materials. In this paper, we analyze the computational requirements for one of the standard algorithms to perform quantum chemistry on a quantum computer. We focus on the quantum resources required to find the ground state of a molecule twice as large as what current classical computers can solve exactly. We find that while such a problem requires about a ten-fold increase in the number of qubits over current technology, the required increase in the number of gates that can be coherently executed is many orders of magnitude larger. This suggests that for quantum computation to become useful for quantum chemistry problems, drastic algorithmic improvements will be needed.
  • We supply a rigorous proof that an open dense set of all possible 2-qubit gates G has the property that if the quantum circuit model is restricted to only permit swap of qubits lines and the application of G to pairs of lines, then the model is still computationally universal.
  • We show that supersymmetry emerges in a large class of models in 1+1 dimensions with both Z_2 and U(1) symmetry at the multicritical point where the Ising and Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transitions coincide. To arrive at this result we perform a detailed renormalization group analysis of the multicritical theory including all perturbations allowed by symmetry. This analysis reveals an intricate flow with a marginally irrelevant direction that preserves part of the supersymmetry of the fixed point. The slow flow along this special line has significant consequences on the physics of the multicritical point. In particular, we show that the scaling of the U(1) gap away from the multicritical point is different from the usual Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless exponential gap scaling.
  • The question whether Anderson insulators can persist to finite-strength interactions - a scenario dubbed many-body localization - has recently received a great deal of interest. The origin of such a many-body localized phase has been described as localization in Fock space, a picture we examine numerically. We then formulate a precise sense in which a single energy eigenstate of a Hamiltonian can be adiabatically connected to a state of a non-interacting Anderson insulator. We call such a state a many-body localized state and define a many-body localized phase as one in which almost all states are many-body localized states. We explore the possible consequences of this; the most striking is an area law for the entanglement entropy of almost all excited states in a many-body localized phase. We present the results of numerical calculations for a one-dimensional system of spinless fermions. Our results are consistent with an area law and, by implication, many-body localization for almost all states and almost all regions for weak enough interactions and strong disorder. However, there are rare regions and rare states with much larger entanglement entropies. Furthermore, we study the implications that many-body localization may have for topological phases and self-correcting quantum memories. We find that there are scenarios in which many-body localization can help to stabilize topological order at non-zero energy density, and we propose potentially useful criteria to confirm these scenarios.