• Polarised radio emission from PSR J1745-2900 has already been used to investigate the strength of the magnetic field in the Galactic Centre, close to Sagittarius A*. Here we report how persistent radio emission from this magnetar, for over four years since its discovery, has revealed large changes in the observed Faraday rotation measure, by up to 3500 rad m$^{-2}$ (a five per cent fractional change). From simultaneous analysis of the dispersion measure, we determine that these fluctuations are dominated by variations in the projected magnetic field, rather than the integrated free electron density, along the changing line of sight to the rapidly moving magnetar. From a structure function analysis of rotation measure variations, and a recent epoch of rapid change of rotation measure, we determine a minimum scale of magnetic fluctuations of size ~ 2 au at the Galactic Centre distance, inferring PSR J1745-2900 is just ~ 0.1 pc behind an additional scattering screen.
  • We report on the results of a 4-year timing campaign of PSR~J2222$-0137$, a 2.44-day binary pulsar with a massive white dwarf (WD) companion, with the Nan\c{c}ay, Effelsberg and Lovell radio telescopes. Using the Shapiro delay for this system, we find a pulsar mass $m_{p}=1.76,\pm\,0.06,M_\odot$ and a WD mass $m_{c}\,=\,1.293\,\pm\,0.025\, M_\odot$. We also measure the rate of advance of periastron for this system, which is marginally consistent with the GR prediction for these masses. The short lifetime of the massive WD progenitor star led to a rapid X-ray binary phase with little ($< \, 10^{-2} \, M_\odot$) mass accretion onto the neutron star (NS); hence, the current pulsar mass is, within uncertainties, its birth mass; the largest measured to date. We discuss the discrepancy with previous mass measurements for this system; we conclude that the measurements presented here are likely to be more accurate. Finally, we highlight the usefulness of this system for testing alternative theories of gravity by tightly constraining the presence of dipolar radiation. This is of particular importance for certain aspects of strong-field gravity, like spontaneous scalarization, since the mass of PSR~J2222$-0137$ puts that system into a poorly tested parameter range.
  • We have searched for continuous gravitational wave (CGW) signals produced by individually resolvable, circular supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) in the latest EPTA dataset, which consists of ultra-precise timing data on 41 millisecond pulsars. We develop frequentist and Bayesian detection algorithms to search both for monochromatic and frequency-evolving systems. None of the adopted algorithms show evidence for the presence of such a CGW signal, indicating that the data are best described by pulsar and radiometer noise only. Depending on the adopted detection algorithm, the 95\% upper limit on the sky-averaged strain amplitude lies in the range $6\times 10^{-15}<A<1.5\times10^{-14}$ at $5{\rm nHz}<f<7{\rm nHz}$. This limit varies by a factor of five, depending on the assumed source position, and the most constraining limit is achieved towards the positions of the most sensitive pulsars in the timing array. The most robust upper limit -- obtained via a full Bayesian analysis searching simultaneously over the signal and pulsar noise on the subset of ours six best pulsars -- is $A\approx10^{-14}$. These limits, the most stringent to date at $f<10{\rm nHz}$, exclude the presence of sub-centiparsec binaries with chirp mass $\cal{M}_c>10^9$M$_\odot$ out to a distance of about 25Mpc, and with $\cal{M}_c>10^{10}$M$_\odot$ out to a distance of about 1Gpc ($z\approx0.2$). We show that state-of-the-art SMBHB population models predict $<1\%$ probability of detecting a CGW with the current EPTA dataset, consistent with the reported non-detection. We stress, however, that PTA limits on individual CGW have improved by almost an order of magnitude in the last five years. The continuing advances in pulsar timing data acquisition and analysis techniques will allow for strong astrophysical constraints on the population of nearby SMBHBs in the coming years.
  • We present new limits on an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave background (GWB) using a six pulsar dataset spanning 18 yr of observations from the 2015 European Pulsar Timing Array data release. Performing a Bayesian analysis, we fit simultaneously for the intrinsic noise parameters for each pulsar, along with common correlated signals including clock, and Solar System ephemeris errors, obtaining a robust 95$\%$ upper limit on the dimensionless strain amplitude $A$ of the background of $A<3.0\times 10^{-15}$ at a reference frequency of $1\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$ and a spectral index of $13/3$, corresponding to a background from inspiralling super-massive black hole binaries, constraining the GW energy density to $\Omega_\mathrm{gw}(f)h^2 < 1.1\times10^{-9}$ at 2.8 nHz. We also present limits on the correlated power spectrum at a series of discrete frequencies, and show that our sensitivity to a fiducial isotropic GWB is highest at a frequency of $\sim 5\times10^{-9}$~Hz. Finally we discuss the implications of our analysis for the astrophysics of supermassive black hole binaries, and present 95$\%$ upper limits on the string tension, $G\mu/c^2$, characterising a background produced by a cosmic string network for a set of possible scenarios, and for a stochastic relic GWB. For a Nambu-Goto field theory cosmic string network, we set a limit $G\mu/c^2<1.3\times10^{-7}$, identical to that set by the {\it Planck} Collaboration, when combining {\it Planck} and high-$\ell$ Cosmic Microwave Background data from other experiments. For a stochastic relic background we set a limit of $\Omega^\mathrm{relic}_\mathrm{gw}(f)h^2<1.2 \times10^{-9}$, a factor of 9 improvement over the most stringent limits previously set by a pulsar timing array.
  • PSR J2032+4127 is a gamma-ray and radio-emitting pulsar which has been regarded as a young luminous isolated neutron star. However, its recent spin-down rate has extraordinarily increased by a factor of two. We present evidence that this is due to its motion as a member of a highly-eccentric binary system with a 15-solar-mass Be star, MT91~213. Timing observations show that, not only are the positions of the two stars coincident within 0.4 arcsec, but timing models of binary motion of the pulsar fit the data much better than a model of a young isolated pulsar. MT91~213, and hence the pulsar, lie in the Cyg~OB2 stellar association, which is at a distance of only 1.4-1.7 kpc. The pulsar is currently on the near side of, and accelerating towards, the Be star, with an orbital period of 20-30 years. The next periastron is well-constrained to occur in early 2018, providing an opportunity to observe enhanced high-energy emission as seen in other Be-star binary systems.
  • With an average density higher than the nuclear density, neutron stars (NS) provide a unique test-ground for nuclear physics, quantum chromodynamics (QCD), and nuclear superfluidity. Determination of the fundamental interactions that govern matter under such extreme conditions is one of the major unsolved problems of modern physics, and -- since it is impossible to replicate these conditions on Earth -- a major scientific motivation for SKA. The most stringent observational constraints come from measurements of NS bulk properties: each model for the microscopic behaviour of matter predicts a specific density-pressure relation (its `Equation of state', EOS). This generates a unique mass-radius relation which predicts a characteristic radius for a large range of masses and a maximum mass above which NS collapse to black holes. It also uniquely predicts other bulk quantities, like maximum spin frequency and moment of inertia. The SKA, in Phase 1 and particularly in Phase 2 will, thanks to the exquisite timing precision enabled by its raw sensitivity, and surveys that dramatically increase the number of sources: 1) Provide many more precise NS mass measurements (high mass NS measurements are particularly important for ruling out EOS models); 2) Allow the measurement of the NS moment of inertia in highly relativistic binaries such as the Double Pulsar; 3) Greatly increase the number of fast-spinning NS, with the potential discovery of spin frequencies above those allowed by some EOS models; 4) Improve our knowledge of new classes of binary pulsars such as black widows and redbacks (which may be massive as a class) through sensitive broad-band radio observations; and 5) Improve our understanding of dense matter superfluidity and the state of matter in the interior through the study of rotational glitches, provided that an ad-hoc campaign is developed.
  • XSS J12270-4859 is an X-ray binary associated with the Fermi LAT gamma-ray source 1FGL J1227.9-4852. In 2012 December, this source underwent a transition where the X-ray and optical luminosity dropped and the spectral signatures of an accretion disc disappeared. We report the discovery of a 1.69 millisecond pulsar (MSP), PSR J1227-4853, at a dispersion measure of 43.4 pc cm$^{-3}$ associated with this source, using the GMRT at 607 MHz. This demonstrates that, post-transition, the system hosts an active radio MSP. This is the third system after PSR J1023+0038 and PSR J1824-2452I showing evidence of state switching between radio MSP and low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) states. We report timing observations of PSR J1227-4853 with the GMRT and Parkes, which give a precise determination of the rotational and orbital parameters of the system. The companion mass measurement of 0.17 to 0.46 M$_{sun}$ suggests that this is a redback system. PSR J1227-4853 is eclipsed for about 40% of its orbit at 607 MHz; with additional short-duration eclipses at all orbital phases. We also find that the pulsar is very energetic, with a spin-down luminosity of ~ 10$^{35}$ erg s$^{-1}$. We report simultaneous imaging and timing observations with the GMRT, which suggests that eclipses are caused by absorption, rather than dispersion smearing or scattering.
  • The 30-Hz rotation rate of the Crab pulsar has been monitored at Jodrell Bank Observatory since 1984 and by other observatories before then. Since 1968, the rotation rate has decreased by about $0.5$\,Hz, interrupted only by sporadic and small spin up events (glitches). 24 of these events have been observed, including a significant concentration of 15 occurring over an interval of 11 years following MJD 50000. The monotonic decrease of the slowdown rate is partially reversed at glitches. This reversal comprises a step and an asymptotic exponential with a 320-day time constant, as determined in the three best-isolated glitches. The cumulative effect of all glitches is to reduce the decrease in slowdown rate by about 6\%. Overall, a low mean braking index of $2.342(1)$ is measured for the whole period, compared with values close to $2.5$ in intervals between glitches. Removing the effects of individual glitches reveals an underlying power law slowdown with the same braking index of 2.5. We interpret this value in terms of a braking torque due to a dipolar magnetic field in which the inclination angle between the dipole and rotation axes is increasing. There may also be further effects due to a monopolar particle wind or infalling supernova debris.
  • PSR J0218$+$4232 is a millisecond pulsar (MSP) with a flux density $\sim$ 0.9 mJy at 1.4 GHz. It is very bright in the high-energy X-ray and $\gamma$-ray domains. We conducted an astrometric program using the European VLBI Network (EVN) at 1.6 GHz to measure its proper motion and parallax. A model-independent distance would also help constrain its $\gamma$-ray luminosity. We achieved a detection of signal-to-noise ratio S/N > 37 for the weak pulsar in all five epochs. Using an extragalactic radio source lying 20 arcmin away from the pulsar, we estimate the pulsar's proper motion to be $\mu_{\alpha}\cos\delta=5.35\pm0.05$ mas yr$^{-1}$ and $\mu_{\delta}=-3.74\pm 0.12$ mas yr$^{-1}$, and a parallax of $\pi=0.16\pm0.09$ mas. The very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) proper motion has significantly improved upon the estimates from long-term pulsar timing observations. The VLBI parallax provides the first model-independent distance constraints: $d=6.3^{+8.0}_{-2.3}$ kpc, with a corresponding $3\sigma$ lower-limit of $d=2.3$ kpc. This is the first pulsar trigonometric parallax measurement based solely on EVN observations. Using the derived distance, we believe that PSR J0218$+$4232 is the most energetic $\gamma$-ray MSP known to date. The luminosity based on even our 3$\sigma$ lower-limit distance is high enough to pose challenges to the conventional outer gap and slot gap models.
  • The steadily improving sensitivity of pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) suggests that gravitational waves (GWs) from supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) systems in the nearby universe will be de- tectable sometime during the next decade. Currently, PTAs assume an equal probability of detection from every sky position, but as evidence grows for a non-isotropic distribution of sources, is there a most likely sky position for a detectable single source of GWs? In this paper, a collection of galactic catalogs is used to calculate various metrics related to the detectability of a single GW source resolv- able above a GW background, assuming that every galaxy has the same probability of containing a SMBHB. Our analyses of these data reveal small probabilities that one of these sources is currently in the PTA band, but as sensitivity is improved regions of consistent probability density are found in predictable locations, specifically around local galaxy clusters.
  • The radio millisecond pulsar PSR J1023+0038 exhibits complex timing and eclipse behavior. Here we analyze four years' worth of radio monitoring observations of this object. We obtain a long-term timing solution, albeit with large residual timing errors as a result of apparent orbital period variations. We also observe variable eclipses when the companion passes near our line of sight, excess dispersion measure near the eclipses and at random orbital phases, and short-term disappearances of signal at random orbital phases. We interpret the eclipses as possibly due to material in the companion's magnetosphere supported by magnetic pressure, and the orbital period variations as possibly due to a gravitational quadrupole coupling mechanism. Both of these mechanisms would be the result of magnetic activity in the companion, in conflict with evolutionary models that predict it should be fully convective and hence non-magnetic. We also use our timing data to test for orbital and rotational modulation of the system's $\gamma$-ray emission, finding no evidence for orbital modulation and $3.7\sigma$ evidence for modulation at the pulsar period. The energetics of the system make it plausible that the $\gamma$-ray emission we observe is entirely from the millisecond pulsar itself, but it seems unlikely for these $\gamma$-rays to provide the irradiation of the companion, which we attribute instead to X-ray heating from a shock powered by a particle wind.
  • Pulsars are highly-magnetised rotating neutron stars and are well-known for the stability of their signature pulse shapes, allowing high-precision studies of their rotation. However, during the past 22 years, the radio pulse profile of the Crab pulsar has shown a steady increase in the separation of the main pulse and interpulse components at 0.62$^{\rm o}\pm$0.03$^{\rm o}$ per century. There are also secular changes in the relative strengths of several components of the profile. The changing component separation indicates that the axis of the dipolar magnetic field, embedded in the neutron star, is moving towards the stellar equator. This evolution of the magnetic field could explain why the pulsar does not spin down as expected from simple braking by a rotating dipolar magnetic field.
  • The LOw Frequency Array, LOFAR, is a next generation radio telescope with its core in the Netherlands and elements distributed throughout Europe. It has exceptional collecting area and wide bandwidths at frequencies from 10 MHz up to 250 MHz. It is in exactly this frequency range where pulsars are brightest and also where they exhibit rapid changes in their emission profiles. Although LOFAR is still in the commissioning phase it is already collecting data of high quality. I will present highlights from our commissioning observations which will include: unique constraints on the site of pulsar emission, individual pulse studies, observations of millisecond pulsars, using pulsars to constrain the properties of the magneto-ionic medium and pilot pulsars surveys. I will also discuss future science projects and advances in the observing capabilities.
  • We present multi-wavelength observations of the radio magnetar PSR J1622-4950 and its environment. Observations of PSR J1622-4950 with Chandra (in 2007 and 2009) and XMM (in 2011) show that the X-ray flux of PSR J1622-4950 has decreased by a factor of ~50 over 3.7 years, decaying exponentially with a characteristic time of 360 +/- 11 days. This behavior identifies PSR J1622-4950 as a possible addition to the small class of transient magnetars. The X-ray decay likely indicates that PSR J1622-4950 is recovering from an X-ray outburst that occurred earlier in 2007, before the 2007 Chandra observations. Observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array show strong radio variability, including a possible radio flaring event at least one and a half years after the 2007 X-ray outburst that may be a direct result of this X-ray event. Radio observations with the Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope reveal that PSR J1622-4950 is 8' southeast of a diffuse radio arc, G333.9+0.0, which appears non-thermal in nature and which could possibly be a previously undiscovered supernova remnant. If G333.9+0.0 is a supernova remnant then the estimates of its size and age, combined with the close proximity and reasonable implied velocity of PSR J1622-4950, suggests that these two objects could be physically associated.
  • The low frequency (110--180 MHz) capabilities of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) are used to characterise a large collection of single pulses from three low magnetic field pulsars. Using the Pulsar Machine II (PuMa-II) to acquire and coherently dedisperse the pulsar signals, we examine whether the bright pulses observed in these pulsars are related to the classical giant pulse emission. Giant pulses are reported from PSR B1112$+$50 and bright pulses from the PSRs B1133$+$16 and B0031$-$07. These pulsars also exhibit large intensity modulations observed as rapid changes in the single pulse intensity. Evidence of global magnetospheric effects is provided by our detection of bright double pulses in PSRs B0031$-$07 and B1133$+$16. Using the multi-frequency observations, we accurately determine the dispersion measures (4.844$\pm$0.002 for B1133$+$16 and 9.1750$\pm$0.0001 for B1112$+$50), derive the radio emission height in PSR B1133$+$16 and report on the properties of subpulse drift modes in these pulsars. We also find that these pulsars show a much larger intensity modulation at low sky frequencies resulting in narrow and bright emissions.
  • This contribution to the proceedings of "A New Golden Age for Radio Astronomy" is simply intended to give some of the highlights from pulsar observations with LOFAR at the time of its official opening: June 12th, 2010. These observations illustrate that, though LOFAR is still under construction and astronomical commissioning, it is already starting to deliver on its promise to revolutionize radio astronomy in the low-frequency regime. These observations also demonstrate how LOFAR has many "next-generation" capabilities, such as wide-field multi-beaming, that will be vital to open a new Golden Age in radio astronomy through the Square Kilometer Array and its precursors.
  • As part of a survey for radio pulsars with the Parkes 64-m telescope we have discovered PSR J1622-4950, a pulsar with a 4.3-s rotation period. Follow-up observations show that the pulsar has the highest inferred surface magnetic field of the known radio pulsars (B ~ 3e14 G), exhibits significant timing noise and appears to have an inverted spectrum. Unlike the vast majority of the known pulsar population, PSR J1622-4950 appears to switch off for many hundreds of days and even in its on-state exhibits extreme variability in its flux density. Furthermore, the integrated pulse profile changes shape with epoch. All of these properties are remarkably similar to the only two magnetars previously known to emit radio pulsations. The position of PSR J1622-4950 is coincident with an X-ray source that, unlike the other radio pulsating magnetars, was found to be in quiescence. We conclude that our newly discovered pulsar is a magnetar - the first to be discovered via its radio emission.
  • The study of transient and variable low-frequency radio sources is a key goal for LOFAR, with an extremely broad science case ranging from relativistic jets sources to pulsars, exoplanets, radio bursts at cosmological distances, the identification of gravitational wave sources and even SETI. In this paper we will very briefly summarize the science of the LOFAR Transients key science project, will outline the capabilities of LOFAR for transient studies, and introduce the LOFAR Radio Sky Monitor, a proposed mode in which LOFAR regularly scans 2 pi radians of sky.
  • A large sample of about two hundred pulsars have been observed to study their subpulse modulation at an observing wavelength of (when achievable) both 21 and 92 cm using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. For 57 pulsars drifting subpulses are discovered for the first time and are confirmed for many others. This leads to the conclusion that it could well be that the drifting subpulse mechanism is an intrinsic property of the emission mechanism itself, although for some pulsars it is difficult or impossible to detect. It appears that the youngest pulsars have the most disordered subpulses and the subpulses become more and more organized into drifting subpulses as the pulsar ages. Drifting subpulses are in general found at both frequencies and the measured values of P3 at the two frequencies are highly correlated, showing the broadband nature of this phenomenon. Also the modulation indices measured at the two frequencies are clearly correlated, although at 92 cm they are on average possibly higher. The correlations with the modulation indices are argued to be consistent with the picture in which the radio emission is composed out of a drifting subpulse signal plus a quasi-steady signal which becomes, on average, stronger at high observing frequencies. There is no obvious correlation found between P3 and the pulsar age (or any other pulsar parameter) contrary to reports in the past.
  • The Pulsar Machine II (PuMa II) is the new flexible pulsar processing backend system at the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT), specifically designed to take advantage of the upgraded WSRT. The instrument is based on a computer cluster running the Linux operating system, with minimal custom hardware. A maximum of 160 MHz analogue bandwidth sampled as 8X20 MHz subbands with 8-bit resolution can be recorded on disks attached to separate computer nodes. Processing of the data is done in the additional 32-nodes allowing near real time coherent dedispersion for most pulsars observed at the WSRT. This has doubled the bandwidth for pulsar observations in general, and has enabled the use of coherent dedispersion over a bandwidth eight times larger than was previously possible at the WSRT. PuMa II is one of the widest bandwidth coherent dedispersion machines currently in use and has a maximum time resolution of 50ns. The system is now routinely used for high precision pulsar timing studies, polarization studies, single pulse work and a variety of other observational work.
  • LOFAR, the Low Frequency Array, is a new radio telescope under construction in the Netherlands, designed to operate between 30 and 240 MHz. The Transients Key Project is one of the four Key Science Projects which comprise the core LOFAR science case. The remit of the Transients Key Project is to study variable and transient radio sources detected by LOFAR, on timescales from milliseconds to years. This will be achieved via both regular snapshot monitoring of historical and newly-discovered radio variables and, most radically, the development of a `Radio Sky Monitor' which will survey a large fraction of the northern sky on a daily basis.