• Strong gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters has become a powerful tool for probing the high-redshift Universe, magnifying distant and faint background galaxies. Reliable strong lensing (SL) models are crucial for determining the intrinsic properties of distant, magnified sources and for constructing their luminosity function. We present here the first SL analysis of MACS J0308.9+2645 and PLCK G171.9-40.7, two massive galaxy clusters imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope in the framework of the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS). We use the Light-Traces-Mass modeling technique to uncover sets of multiply imaged galaxies and constrain the mass distribution of the clusters. Our SL analysis reveals that both clusters have particularly large Einstein radii ($\theta_E>30"$ for a source redshift of $z_s=2$), providing fairly large areas with high magnifications, useful for high-redshift galaxy searches ($\sim2$ arcmin$^{2}$ with $\mu>5$ to $\sim1$ arcmin$^{2}$ with $\mu>10$, similar to a typical \textit{Hubble Frontier Fields} cluster). We also find that MACS J0308.9+2645 hosts a promising, apparently bright (J$\sim23.2-24.6$ AB), multiply imaged high-redshift candidate at $z\sim6.4$. These images are amongst the brightest high-redshift candidates found in RELICS. Our mass models, including magnification maps, are made publicly available for the community through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes.
  • Massive foreground galaxy clusters magnify and distort the light of objects behind them, permitting a view into both the extremely distant and intrinsically faint galaxy populations. We present here the z ~ 6 - 8 candidate high-redshift galaxies from the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS), a Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescope survey of 41 massive galaxy clusters spanning an area of ~200 arcmin^2. These clusters were selected to be excellent lenses and we find similar high-redshift sample sizes and magnitude distributions as CLASH. We discover 321 candidate galaxies with photometric redshifts between z ~ 6 to z ~ 8, including extremely bright objects with H-band magnitudes of m_AB ~ 23 mag. As a sample, the observed (lensed) magnitudes of these galaxies are among the brightest known at z> 6, comparable to much wider, blank-field surveys. RELICS demonstrates the efficiency of using strong gravitational lenses to produce high-redshift samples in the epoch of reionization. These brightly observed galaxies are excellent targets for follow-up study with current and future observatories, including the James Webb Space Telescope.
  • Strong gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters magnifies background galaxies, enhancing our ability to discover statistically significant samples of galaxies at z>6, in order to constrain the high-redshift galaxy luminosity functions. Here, we present the first five lens models out of the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS) Hubble Treasury Program, based on new HST WFC3/IR and ACS imaging of the clusters RXC J0142.9+4438, Abell 2537, Abell 2163, RXC J2211.7-0349, and ACT-CLJ0102-49151. The derived lensing magnification is essential for estimating the intrinsic properties of high-redshift galaxy candidates, and properly accounting for the survey volume. We report on new spectroscopic redshifts of multiply imaged lensed galaxies behind these clusters, which are used as constraints, and detail our strategy to reduce systematic uncertainties due to lack of spectroscopic information. In addition, we quantify the uncertainty on the lensing magnification due to statistical and systematic errors related to the lens modeling process, and find that in all but one cluster, the magnification is constrained to better than 20% in at least 80% of the field of view, including statistical and systematic uncertainties. The five clusters presented in this paper span the range of masses and redshifts of the clusters in the RELICS program. We find that they exhibit similar strong lensing efficiencies to the clusters targeted by the Hubble Frontier Fields within the WFC3/IR field of view. Outputs of the lens models are made available to the community through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes
  • We present a strong-lensing analysis of four massive galaxy clusters imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope in the framework of the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS). We use a Light-Traces-Mass modeling technique to uncover sets of multiply imaged galaxies, and constrain the mass distribution and strong-lensing properties of the clusters. The mass models we present here are the first published for Abell S295 and MACS J0159.8-0849. For Abell 697 (the tenth-highest Sunyaev-Zel'dovich mass cluster in the Planck catalog) and MACS J0025.4-1222 (the "baby bullet" cluster), thanks to RELICS data we are able to improve upon previous models. Our analysis for MACS J0025.4-1222 and Abell S295 shows a bimodal mass distribution following the cluster galaxy concentrations, in support of the merger scenarios proposed in previous studies for these clusters. In addition, the updated model for MACS J0025.4-1222 suggests a substantially smaller critical area than previously estimated. For MACS J0159.8-0849 and Abell 697 we find a single peak and relatively regular morphology, suggesting these are fairly relaxed clusters. Despite being smaller and less prominent lenses on average, three of the four clusters we analyze here seem to have lensing strengths similar to the typical Hubble Frontier Fields cluster in terms of the cumulative area above a certain magnification value (e.g., A($\mu>5$) $\sim 1-3$ arcmin$^2$, A($\mu>10$) $\sim 0.5-1.5$ arcmin$^2$), which in part can be attributed to their merging configurations. We make our lens models publicly available through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes, including mass-density, deflection, shear and magnifications maps.
  • It is well known that galaxies falling into clusters can experience gas stripping due to ram-pressure by the intra-cluster medium (ICM). The most spectacular examples are galaxies with extended tails of optically-bright stripped material known as "jellyfish". We use the first large homogeneous compilation of jellyfish galaxies in clusters from the WINGS and OmegaWINGS surveys, and follow-up MUSE observations from the GASP MUSE programme to investigate the orbital histories of jellyfish galaxies in clusters and reconstruct their stripping history through position vs. velocity phase- space diagrams. We construct analytic models to define the regions in phase-space where ram-pressure stripping is at play. We then study the distribution of cluster galaxies in phase-space and find that jellyfish galaxies have on average higher peculiar velocities (and higher cluster velocity dispersion) than the overall population of cluster galaxies at all clustercentric radii, which is indicative of recent infall into the cluster and radial orbits. In particular, the jellyfish galaxies with the longest gas tails reside very near the cluster cores (in projection) and are moving at very high speeds, which coincides with the conditions of the most intense ram-pressure. We conclude that many of the jellyfish galaxies seen in clusters likely formed via fast (~1- 2 Gyr), incremental, outside-in ram-pressure stripping during first infall into the cluster in highly radial orbits.
  • The so-called jellyfish galaxies are objects exhibiting disturbed morphology, mostly in the form of tails of gas stripped from the main body of the galaxy. Several works have strongly suggested ram pressure stripping to be the mechanism driving this phenomenon. Here, we focus on one of these objects, drawn from a sample of optically selected jellyfish galaxies, and use it to validate SINOPSIS, the spectral fitting code that will be used for the analysis of the GASP (GAs Stripping Phenomena in galaxies with MUSE) survey, and study the spatial distribution and physical properties of gas and stellar populations in this galaxy. We compare the model spectra to those obtained with GANDALF, a code with similar features widely used to interpret the kinematic of stars and gas in galaxies from IFU data. We find that SINOPSIS can reproduce the pixel-by-pixel spectra of this galaxy at least as good as GANDALF does, providing reliable estimates of the underlying stellar absorption to properly correct the nebular gas emission. Using these results, we find strong evidences of a double effect of ram pressure exerted by the intracluster medium onto the gas of the galaxy. A moderate burst of star formation, dating between 20 and 500 Myr ago and involving the outer parts of the galaxy more strongly than the inner regions, was likely induced by a first interaction of the galaxy with the intracluster medium. Stripping by ram pressure, plus probable gas depletion due to star formation, contributed to create a truncated ionized gas disk. The presence of an extended stellar tail on only one side of the disk, points instead to another kind of process, likely a gravitational interaction by a fly-by or a close encounter with another galaxy in the cluster.
  • In the context of the GAs Stripping Phenomena in galaxies with Muse (GASP) survey, we present the characterization of JO204, a jellyfish galaxy in A957, a relatively low-mass cluster with $M=4.4 \times10^{14}M_\odot$. This galaxy shows a tail of ionized gas that extends up to 30 kpc from the main body in the opposite direction of the cluster center. No gas emission is detected in the galaxy outer disk, suggesting that gas stripping is proceeding outside-in. The stellar component is distributed as a regular disk galaxy; the stellar kinematics shows a symmetric rotation curve with a maximum radial velocity of 200km/s out to 20 kpc from the galaxy center. The radial velocity of the gas component in the central part of the disk follows the distribution of the stellar component; the gas kinematics in the tail retains the rotation of the galaxy disk, indicating that JO204 is moving at high speed in the intracluster medium. Both the emission and radial velocity maps of the gas and stellar components indicate ram-pressure as the most likely primary mechanism for gas stripping, as expected given that JO204 is close to the cluster center and it is likely at the first infall in the cluster. The spatially resolved star formation history of JO204 provides evidence that the onset of ram-pressure stripping occurred in the last 500 Myr, quenching the star formation activity in the outer disk, where the gas has been already completely stripped. Our conclusions are supported by a set of hydrodynamic simulations.
  • When supermassive black holes at the center of galaxies accrete matter (usually gas), they give rise to highly energetic phenomena named Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). A number of physical processes have been proposed to account for the funneling of gas towards the galaxy centers to feed the AGN. There are also several physical processes that can strip gas from a galaxy, and one of them is ram pressure stripping in galaxy clusters due to the hot and dense gas filling the space between galaxies. We report the discovery of a strong connection between severe ram pressure stripping and the presence of AGN activity. Searching in galaxy clusters at low redshift, we have selected the most extreme examples of jellyfish galaxies, which are galaxies with long tentacles of material extending for dozens of kpc beyond the galaxy disk. Using the MUSE spectrograph on the ESO Very Large Telescope, we find that 6 out of the 7 galaxies of this sample host a central AGN, and two of them also have galactic-scale AGN ionization cones. The high incidence of AGN among the most striking jellyfishes may be due to ram pressure causing gas to flow towards the center and triggering the AGN activity, or to an enhancement of the stripping caused by AGN energy injection, or both. Our analysis of the galaxy position and velocity relative to the cluster strongly supports the first hypothesis, and puts forward ram pressure as another, yet unforeseen, possible mechanism for feeding the central supermassive black hole with gas.
  • Within the GAs Stripping Phenomena in galaxies with MUSE (GASP) sample, we identified an ongoing merger between two galaxies in a poor group at $z = 0.05043$. We present the spatially resolved kinematics and physical properties of gas and stars of this object and describe its evolutionary history. An old (luminosity weighted age $\rm \sim 2\times 10^9 \, yr$), gas poor, early-type-like galaxy is merging with a younger (luminosity weighted age $\rm \sim 2.5\times 10^8 \, yr$), gas rich, late-type galaxy. The system has a quite strong metallicity gradient, indicative of an early-stage phase. Comparing the spatial extension of the star formation at different epochs, we can date the beginning of the merging between $\rm 2\times 10^7 yr <t<5.7\times 10^8 yr$ ago. The gas kinematic pattern reflects the gas of the late-type object and is distorted mainly in correspondence to the location of the impact, while the northern regions had not time to be noticeably influenced yet. The stellar kinematic instead is much more chaotic, as expected in case of mergers. The gas redistribution in the system induces high levels of star formation between the two components, especially in the region of the impact, where we detect the formation of a tidal dwarf galaxy. This stellar structure has a mass of $\sim 6\times 10^9 M_\odot$ and a radius of $\rm \sim 2 \, kpc$ and, even though it has already accreted large quantities of gas and stars, it is still located within the disk of the progenitor, is characterized by a high velocity dispersion, indication that it is still forming, is dusty and has high levels of star formation (SFR$\sim 0.3 M_\odot \, yr^{-1}$). This tidal dwarf is originated in an early-stage merger, while these stellar structures usually form in more evolved systems. [Abridged]
  • GASP (GAs Stripping Phenomena in galaxies with MUSE) is a new integral-field spectroscopic survey with MUSE at the VLT aiming at studying gas removal processes in galaxies. We present an overview of the survey and show a first example of a galaxy undergoing strong gas stripping. GASP is obtaining deep MUSE data for 114 galaxies at z=0.04-0.07 with stellar masses in the range 10^9.2-10^11.5 M_sun in different environments (galaxy clusters and groups, over more than four orders of magnitude in halo mass). GASP targets galaxies with optical signatures of unilateral debris or tails reminiscent of gas stripping processes ("jellyfish galaxies"), as well as a control sample of disk galaxies with no morphological anomalies. GASP is the only existing Integral Field Unit (IFU) survey covering both the main galaxy body and the outskirts and surroundings, where the IFU data can reveal the presence and the origin of the outer gas. To demonstrate GASP's ability to probe the physics of gas and stars, we show the complete analysis of a textbook case of a "jellyfish" galaxy, JO206. This is a massive galaxy (9 x 10^10 M_sun in a low-mass cluster (sigma ~500 km/s), at a small projected clustercentric radius and a high relative velocity, with >=90kpc-long tentacles of ionized gas stripped away by ram pressure. We present the spatially resolved kinematics and physical properties of gas and stars, and depict the evolutionary history of this galaxy.
  • The CIII] and CIV rest-frame UV emission lines are powerful probes of the ionizations states of galaxies. They have furthermore been suggested as alternatives for spectroscopic redshift confirmation of objects at the epoch of reionization ($z>6$), where the most frequently used redshift indicator, Ly$\alpha$, is attenuated by the high fraction of neutral hydrogen in the inter-galactic medium. However, currently only very few confirmations of carbon UV lines at these high redshifts exist, making it challenging to quantify these claims. Here, we present the detection of CIV$\lambda\lambda$1548,1551\AA\ in \HST\ slitless grism spectroscopy obtained by GLASS of a Ly$\alpha$ emitter at $z=6.11$ multiply imaged by the massive foreground galaxy cluster RXJ2248. The CIV emission is detected at the 3--5$\sigma$ level in two images of the source, with marginal detection in two other images. We do not detect significant CIII]$\lambda\lambda$1907,1909\AA\ emission implying an equivalent width EW$_\textrm{CIII]}<20$\AA\ (1$\sigma$) and $\textrm{CIV/CIII}>0.7$ (2$\sigma$). Combined with limits on the rest-frame UV flux from the HeII$\lambda$1640\AA\ emission line and the OIII]$\lambda\lambda$1661,1666\AA\ doublet, we put constraints on the metallicity and the ionization state of the galaxy. The estimated line ratios and equivalent widths do not support a scenario where an AGN is responsible for ionizing the carbon atoms. SED fits including nebular emission lines imply a source with a mass of log(M/M$_\odot)\sim9$, SFR of around 10M$_\odot$/yr, and a young stellar population $<50$Myr old. The source shows a stronger ionizing radiation field than objects with detected CIV emission at $z<2$ and adds to the growing sample of low-mass (log(M/M$_\odot)\lesssim9$) galaxies at the epoch of reionization with strong radiation fields from star formation.
  • Exploiting the data of the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS), we characterize the spatial distribution of star formation in 76 high star forming galaxies in 10 clusters at 0.3< z <0.7. All these galaxies are likely restricted to first infall. In a companion paper we contrast the properties of field and cluster galaxies, whereas here we correlate the properties of H{\alpha} emitters to a number of tracers of the cluster environment to investigate its role in driving galaxy transformations. H{\alpha} emitters are found in the clusters out to 0.5 virial radii, the maximum radius covered by GLASS. The peak of the H{\alpha} emission is offset with respect to the peak of the UV-continuum. We decompose this offsets into a radial and tangential component. The radial compo- nent points away from the cluster center in 60% of the cases, with 95% confidence. The decompositions agree with cosmological simulations, i.e. the H{\alpha} emission offset correlates with galaxy velocity and ram-pressure stripping signatures. Trends between H{\alpha} emitter properties and surface mass density distributions and X-ray emissions emerge only for unrelaxed clusters. The lack of strong correlations with the global environment does not allow us to identify a unique environmental effect originating from the cluster center. In contrast, correla- tions between H{\alpha} morphology and local number density emerge. We conclude that local effects, uncorrelated to the cluster-centric radius, play a more important role in shaping galaxy properties.
  • We present the first results of the KMOS Lens-Amplified Spectroscopic Survey (KLASS), a new ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) large program, doing multi-object integral field spectroscopy of galaxies gravitationally lensed behind seven galaxy clusters selected from the HST Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS). Using the power of the cluster magnification we are able to reveal the kinematic structure of 25 galaxies at $0.7 \lesssim z \lesssim 2.3$, in four cluster fields, with stellar masses $8 \lesssim \log{(M_\star/M_\odot)} \lesssim 11$. This sample includes 5 sources at $z>1$ with lower stellar masses than in any previous kinematic IFU surveys. Our sample displays a diversity in kinematic structure over this mass and redshift range. The majority of our kinematically resolved sample is rotationally supported, but with a lower ratio of rotational velocity to velocity dispersion than in the local universe, indicating the fraction of dynamically hot disks changes with cosmic time. We find no galaxies with stellar mass $<3 \times 10^9 M_\odot$ in our sample display regular ordered rotation. Using the enhanced spatial resolution from lensing, we resolve a lower number of dispersion dominated systems compared to field surveys, competitive with findings from surveys using adaptive optics. We find that the KMOS IFUs recover emission line flux from HST grism-selected objects more faithfully than slit spectrographs. With artificial slits we estimate slit spectrographs miss on average 60% of the total flux of emission lines, which decreases rapidly if the emission line is spatially offset from the continuum.
  • The selection of high redshift sources from broad-band photometry using the Lyman-break galaxy (LBG) technique is a well established methodology, but the characterization of its contamination for the faintest sources is still incomplete. We use the optical and near-IR data from four (ultra)deep Hubble Space Telescope legacy fields to investigate the contamination fraction of LBG samples at z~5-8 selected using a colour-colour method. Our approach is based on characterizing the number count distribution of interloper sources, that is galaxies with colors similar to those of LBGs, but showing detection at wavelengths shorter than the spectral break. Without sufficient sensitivity at bluer wavelengths, a subset of interlopers may not be properly classified, and contaminate the LBG selection. The surface density of interlopers in the sky gets steeper with increasing redshift of LBG selections. Since the intrinsic number of dropouts decreases significantly with increasing redshift, this implies increasing contamination from misclassified interlopers with increasing redshift, primarily by intermediate redshift sources with unremarkable properties (intermediate ages, lack of ongoing star formation and low/moderate dust content). Using Monte Carlo simulations, we estimate that the CANDELS deep data have contamination induced by photometric scatter increasing from ~2% at z~5 to ~6% at z~8 for a typical dropout color >1 mag, with contamination naturally decreasing for a more stringent dropout selection. Contaminants are expected to be located preferentially near the detection limit of surveys, ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 contaminants per arcmin2 at J=30, depending on the field considered. This analysis suggests that the impact of contamination in future studies of z>10 galaxies needs to be carefully considered.
  • Using deep Hubble Frontier Fields imaging and slitless spectroscopy from the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space, we analyze 2200 cluster and 1748 field galaxies at $0.2\leq z\leq0.7$ to determine the impact of environment on galaxy size and structure at $\log M_*/M_\odot>7.8$, an unprecedented limit at these redshifts. Based on simple assumptions-$r_e=f(M_*)$-we find no significant differences in half-light radii ($r_e$) between equal-mass cluster or field systems. More complex analyses-$r_e=f(M_*,U-V,n,z,\Sigma$)-reveal local density $(\Sigma$) to induce only a $7\% \pm 3\%$ ($95\%$ confidence) reduction in $r_e$ beyond what can be accounted for by $U-V$ color, Sersic index ($n$), and redshift ($z$) effects.Almost any size difference between galaxies in high- and low-density regions is thus attributable to their different distributions in properties other than environment. Indeed, we find a clear color-$r_e$ correlation in low-mass passive cluster galaxies ($\log M_*/M_\odot<9.8$) such that bluer systems have larger radii, with the bluest having sizes consistent with equal-mass star-forming galaxies. We take this as evidence that large-$r_e$ low-mass passive cluster galaxies are recently acquired systems that have been environmentally quenched without significant structural transformation (e.g., by ram pressure stripping or starvation).Conversely, $\sim20\%$ of small-$r_e$ low-mass passive cluster galaxies appear to have been in place since $z\sim3$. Given the consistency of the small-$r_e$ galaxies' stellar surface densities (and even colors) with those of systems more than ten times as massive, our findings suggest that clusters mark places where galaxy evolution is accelerated for an ancient base population spanning most masses, with late-time additions quenched by environment-specific mechanisms are mainly restricted to the lowest masses.
  • (Abridged) We combine deep HST grism spectroscopy with a new Bayesian method to derive maps of gas-phase metallicity, nebular dust extinction, and star-formation rate for 10 star-forming galaxies at high redshift ($1.2<z<2.3$). Exploiting lensing magnification by the foreground cluster MACS1149.6+2223, we reach sub-kpc spatial resolution and push the stellar mass limit associated with such high-z spatially resolved measurements below $10^8M_\odot$ for the first time. Our maps exhibit diverse morphologies, indicative of various effects such as efficient radial mixing from tidal torques, rapid accretion of low-metallicity gas, etc., which can affect the gas and metallicity distributions in individual galaxies. Based upon an exhaustive sample of all existing sub-kpc metallicity gradients at high-z, we find that predictions given by analytical chemical evolution models assuming a relatively extended star-formation profile in the early disk formation phase can explain the majority of observed gradients, without involving galactic feedback or radial outflows. We observe a tentative correlation between stellar mass and metallicity gradient, consistent with the downsizing galaxy formation picture that more massive galaxies are more evolved into a later phase of disk growth, where they experience more coherent mass assembly at all radii and thus show shallower metallicity gradients. In addition, we compile a sample of homogeneously cross-calibrated integrated metallicity measurements spanning three orders of magnitude in stellar mass at $z\sim1.8$. We use this sample to study the mass-metallicity relation (MZR) and test the fundamental metallicity relation (FMR). The slope of the observed MZR can rule out the momentum-driven wind model at 3-$\sigma$ confidence level. We find no significant offset with respect to the FMR, taking into account the intrinsic scatter and measurement uncertainties.
  • Exploiting the slitless spectroscopy taken as part of the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS), we present an extended analysis of the spatial distribution of star formation in 76 galaxies in 10 clusters at 0.3< z <0.7. We use 85 foreground and background galaxies in the same redshift range as a field sample. The samples are well matched in stellar mass (10^8-10^11 M_sun) and star formation rate (0.5-50 M_sun/yr). We visually classify galaxies in terms of broad-band morphology, Halpha morphology and likely physical process acting on the galaxy. Most Halpha emitters have a spiral morphology (41+/-8% in clusters, 51+/-8% in the field), followed by mergers/interactions (28+/-8%, 31+/-7%, respectively) and early-type galaxies (remarkably as high as 29+/-8% in clusters and 15+/-6% in the field). A diversity of Halpha morphologies is detected, suggesting a diversity of physical processes. In clusters, 30+/-8% of the galaxies present a regular morphology, mostly consistent with star formation diffused uniformly across the stellar population (mostly in the disk component, when present). The second most common morphology (28+/-8%) is asymmetric/jellyfish, consistent with ram pressure stripping or other non-gravitational processes in 18+/-8% of the cases. Ram pressure stripping appears significantly less prominent in the field (2+/-2%), where the most common morphology/mechanism appears to be consistent with minor gas rich mergers or clump accretion. This work demonstrates that while environment specific mechanisms affect galaxy evolution at this redshift, they are diverse and their effects subtle. A full understanding of this complexity requires larger samples and detailed and spatially resolved physical models.
  • Using single-component fits to SDSS/UKIDSS images of galaxies in the G09 region of the GAMA survey we study radial colour gradients across the galaxy population. We use the multiwavelength information provided by MegaMorph analysis of galaxy light profiles to calculate intrinsic colour gradients, and divide into six subsamples split by overall S\'{e}rsic index ($n$) and galaxy colour. We find a bimodality in the colour gradients of high- and low-$n$ galaxies in all wavebands, which varies with overall galaxy luminosity. Global trends in colour gradients therefore result from combining the contrasting behaviour of a number of different galaxy populations. The ubiquity of strong negative colour gradients supports the picture of inside-out growth through gas accretion for blue, low-$n$ galaxies, and through dry minor mergers for red, high-$n$ galaxies. An exception is the blue high-n population, with properties indicative of dissipative major mergers.
  • We present an overview of the "KIFF" project, which provides ultra-deep Ks-band imaging of all six of the Hubble Frontier Fields clusters Abell 2744, MACS-0416, Abell S1063, Abell 370, MACS-0717 and MACS-1149. All of these fields have recently been observed with large allocations of Directors' Discretionary Time with the HST and Spitzer telescopes covering 0.4 < lambda < 1.6 microns and 3.6--4.5 microns, respectively. VLT/HAWK-I integrations of the first four fields reach 5-sigma limiting depths of Ks~26.0 (AB, point sources) and have excellent image quality (FWHM ~ 0."4). Shorter Keck/MOSFIRE integrations of the MACS-0717 (MACS-1149) field better observable in the north reach limiting depths Ks=25.5 (25.1) with seeing FWHM ~0."4 (0."5). In all cases the Ks-band mosaics cover the primary cluster and parallel HST/ACS+WFC3 fields. The total area of the Ks-band coverage is 490 arcmin^2. The Ks-band at 2.2 microns crucially fills the gap between the reddest HST filter (1.6 micron ~ H-band) and the IRAC 3.6 micron passband. While reaching the full depths of the space-based imaging is not currently feasible from the ground, the deep Ks-band images provide important constraints on both the redshifts and the stellar population properties of galaxies extending well below the characteristic stellar mass across most of the age of the universe, down to, and including, the redshifts of the targeted galaxy clusters (z < 0.5).
  • Quiescent galaxies with little or no ongoing star formation dominate the galaxy population above $M_{*}\sim 2 \times 10^{10}~M_{\odot}$, where their numbers have increased by a factor of $\sim25$ since $z\sim2$. Once star formation is initially shut down, perhaps during the quasar phase of rapid accretion onto a supermassive black hole, an unknown mechanism must remove or heat subsequently accreted gas from stellar mass loss or mergers that would otherwise cool to form stars. Energy output from a black hole accreting at a low rate has been proposed, but observational evidence for this in the form of expanding hot gas shells is indirect and limited to radio galaxies at the centers of clusters, which are too rare to explain the vast majority of the quiescent population. Here we report bisymmetric emission features co-aligned with strong ionized gas velocity gradients from which we infer the presence of centrally-driven winds in typical quiescent galaxies that host low-luminosity active nuclei. These galaxies are surprisingly common, accounting for as much as $10\%$ of the population at $M_* \sim 2 \times 10^{10}~ M_{\odot}$. In a prototypical example, we calculate that the energy input from the galaxy's low-level active nucleus is capable of driving the observed wind, which contains sufficient mechanical energy to heat ambient, cooler gas (also detected) and thereby suppress star formation.
  • With a large sample of bright, low-redshift galaxies with optical$-$near-IR imaging from the GAMA survey we use bulge-disc decompositions to understand the wavelength-dependent behavior of single-S\'ersic structural measurements. We denote the variation in single-S\'ersic index with wavelength as $\mathcal{N}$, likewise for effective radius we use $\mathcal{R}$. We find that most galaxies with a substantial disc, even those with no discernable bulge, display a high value of $\mathcal{N}$. The increase in S\'ersic index to longer wavelengths is therefore intrinsic to discs, apparently resulting from radial variations in stellar population and/or dust reddening. Similarly, low values of $\mathcal{R}$ ($<$ 1) are found to be ubiquitous, implying an element of universality in galaxy colour gradients. We also study how bulge and disc colour distributions vary with galaxy type. We find that, rather than all bulges being red and all discs being blue in absolute terms, both components become redder for galaxies with redder total colours. We even observe that bulges in bluer galaxies are typically bluer than discs in red galaxies, and that bulges and discs are closer in colour for fainter galaxies. Trends in total colour are therefore not solely due to the colour or flux dominance of the bulge or disc.
  • We present a strong and weak gravitational lens model of the galaxy cluster MACSJ0416.1-2403, constrained using spectroscopy from the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) and Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) imaging data. We search for emission lines in known multiply imaged sources in the GLASS spectra, obtaining secure spectroscopic redshifts of 31 multiple images belonging to 16 distinct source galaxies. The GLASS spectra provide the first spectroscopic measurements for 6 of the source galaxies. The weak lensing signal is acquired from 884 galaxies in the F606W HFF image. By combining the weak lensing constraints with 15 multiple image systems with spectroscopic redshifts and 9 multiple image systems with photometric redshifts, we reconstruct the gravitational potential of the cluster on an adaptive grid. The resulting total mass density map is compared with a stellar mass density map obtained from the deep Spitzer Frontier Fields imaging data to study the relative distribution of stellar and total mass in the cluster. We find that the projected stellar mass to total mass ratio, $f_{\star}$, varies considerably with the stellar surface mass density. The mean projected stellar mass to total mass ratio is $\langle f_{\star} \rangle= 0.009 \pm 0.003 $ (stat.), but with a systematic error as large as $0.004-0.005$, dominated by the choice of the IMF. We find agreement with several recent measurements of $f_{\star}$ in massive cluster environments. The lensing maps of convergence, shear, and magnification are made available to the broader community in the standard HFF format.
  • The star formation quenching depends on environment, but a full understanding of what mechanisms drive it is still missing. Exploiting a sample of galaxies with masses $M_\ast>10^{9.8}M_\odot$, drawn from the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) and its recent extension OMEGAWINGS, we investigate the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of stellar mass (M$_*$) in galaxy clusters at $0.04<z<0.07$. We use non-member galaxies at 0.02$<$z$<$0.09 as field control sample. Overall, we find agreement between the SFR-M$_*$ relation in the two environments, but detect a population of cluster galaxies with reduced SFRs which is rare in the field. These {\it transition} galaxies are mainly found within the cluster virial radius ($R_{200}$) but they impact on the SFR-M$_*$ relation only within 0.6R$_{200}$. The ratio of transition to PSF galaxies strongly depends on environment, being larger than 0.6 within 0.3R$_{200}$ and rapidly decreasing with distance, while it is almost flat with $M_*$. As galaxies move downward from the SFR-M$_*$ main sequence, they become redder and present older luminosity and mass weighted ages. These trends, together with the analysis of the star formation histories, suggest that transition galaxies have had a reduced SFR for the past 2-5 Gyr. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the interaction of galaxies with the intracluster medium via strangulation causes a gradual shut down of star formation, giving birth to an evolved population of galaxies in transition from being star forming to becoming passive.
  • The growth of galaxies is a key problem in understanding the structure and evolution of the universe. Galaxies grow their stellar mass by a combination of star formation and mergers, with a relative importance that is redshift dependent. Theoretical models predict quantitatively different contributions from the two channels; measuring these from the data is a crucial constraint. Exploiting the UltraVISTA catalog and a unique sample of progenitors of local ultra massive galaxies selected with an abundance matching approach, we quantify the role of the two mechanisms from z=2 to 0. We also compare our results to two independent incarnations of semi-analytic models. At all redshifts, progenitors are found in a variety of environments, ranging from being isolated to having 5-10 companions with mass ratio at least 1:10 within a projected radius of 500 kpc. In models, progenitors have a systematically larger number of companions, entailing a larger mass growth for mergers than in observations, at all redshifts. Generally, in both observations and models, the inferred and the expected mass growth roughly agree, within the uncertainties. Overall, our analysis confirms the model predictions, showing how the growth history of massive galaxies is dominated by in situ star formation at z~2, both star-formation and mergers at 1<z<2, and by mergers alone at z<1. Nonetheless, detailed comparisons still point out to tensions between the expected mass growth and our results, which might be due to either an incorrect progenitors-descendants selection, uncertainties on star formation rate and mass estimates, or the adopted assumptions on merger rates.
  • We present the first study of the spatial distribution of star formation in z~0.5 cluster galaxies. The analysis is based on data taken with the Wide Field Camera 3 as part of the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS). We illustrate the methodology by focusing on two clusters (MACS0717.5+3745 and MACS1423.8+2404) with different morphologies (one relaxed and one merging) and use foreground and background galaxies as field control sample. The cluster+field sample consists of 42 galaxies with stellar masses in the range 10^8-10^11 M_sun, and star formation rates in the range 1-20 M_sun/yr. Both in clusters and in the field, H{\alpha} is more extended than the rest-frame UV continuum in 60% of the cases, consistent with diffuse star formation and inside out growth. In ~20% of the cases, the H{\alpha} emission appears more extended in cluster galaxies than in the field, pointing perhaps to ionized gas being stripped and/or star formation being enhanced at large radii. The peak of the H{\alpha} emission and that of the continuum are offset by less than 1 kpc. We investigate trends with the hot gas density as traced by the X-ray emission, and with the surface mass density as inferred from gravitational lens models and find no conclusive results. The diversity of morphologies and sizes observed in H_alpha illustrates the complexity of the environmental process that regulate star formation. Upcoming analysis of the full GLASS dataset will increase our sample size by almost an order of magnitude, verifying and strengthening the inference from this initial dataset.