• A number of recent applications of jet substructure, in particular searches for light new particles, require substructure observables that are decorrelated with the jet mass. In this paper we introduce the Convolved SubStructure (CSS) approach, which uses a theoretical understanding of the observable to decorrelate the complete shape of its distribution. This decorrelation is performed by convolution with a shape function whose parameters and mass dependence are derived analytically. We consider in detail the case of the $D_2$ observable and perform an illustrative case study using a search for a light hadronically decaying $Z'$. We find that the CSS approach completely decorrelates the $D_2$ observable over a wide range of masses. Our approach highlights the importance of improving the theoretical understanding of jet substructure observables to exploit increasingly subtle features for performance.
  • Proton-proton (pp) data show collective effects, such as long-range azimuthal correlations and strangeness enhancement, which are similar to phenomenology observed in heavy ion collisions. Using simulations with and without explicit existing models of collective effects, we explore new ways to probe pp collisions at high multiplicity, in order to suggest measurements that could help identify the similarities and differences between large- and small-scale collective effects. In particular, we focus on the properties of jets produced in ultra-central pp collisions in association with a Z boson. We consider observables such as jet energy loss and jet shapes, which could point to the possible existence of an underlying quark-gluon plasma, or other new dynamical effects related to the presence of large hadronic densities.
  • Due to a limited bandwidth and a large proton-proton interaction cross-section relative to the rate of interesting physics processes, most events produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are discarded in real time. A sophisticated trigger system must quickly decide which events should be kept and is very efficient for a broad range of processes. However, there are many processes that cannot be accommodated by this trigger system. Furthermore, there may be models of physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM) constructed after data taking that could have been triggered, but no trigger was implemented at run time. Both of these cases can be covered by exploiting pileup interactions as an effective zero bias sample. At the end of High-Luminosity LHC operations, this zero bias dataset will have accumulated about 1/fb of data from which a bottom line cross-section limit of O(1) fb can be set for BSM models already in the literature and those yet to come.
  • The oldest and most robust technique to search for new particles is to look for `bumps' in invariant mass spectra over smoothly falling backgrounds. This is a powerful technique, but only uses one-dimensional information. One can restrict the phase space to enhance a potential signal, but such tagging techniques require a signal hypothesis and training a classifier in simulation and applying it on data. We present a new method for using all of the available information (with machine learning) without using any prior knowledge about potential signals. Given the lack of new physics signals at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), such model independent approaches are critical for ensuring full coverage to fully exploit the rich datasets from the LHC experiments. In addition to illustrating how the new method works in simple test cases, we demonstrate the power of the extended bump hunt on a realistic all-hadronic resonance search in a channel that would not be covered with existing techniques.
  • Modern silicon tracking detectors based on hybrid or fully integrated CMOS technology are continuing to push to thinner sensors. The ionization energy loss fluctuation in very thin silicon sensors significantly deviates from the Landau distribution. Therefore, we have developed a charge deposition setup that implements the Bichsel straggling function, which accounts for shell-effects. This enhanced simulation is important for comparing with testbeam or collision data with thin sensors as demonstrated by reproducing more realistically the degraded position resolution compared with na\"{i}ve ionization models based on simple Landau-like fluctuation. Our implementation of the Bichsel model and the multipurpose photo absorption ionization (PAI) model in Geant4 produce similar results above a few microns thickness. Below a few microns, the PAI model does not fully capture the complete shell effects that are in the Bichsel model. The code is made publicly available as part of the Allpix software package in order to facilitate predictions for new detector designs and comparisons with testbeam data.
  • Silicon tracking detectors can record the charge in each channel (analog or digitized) or have only binary readout (hit or no hit). While there is significant literature on the position resolution obtained from interpolation of charge measurements, a comprehensive study of the resolution obtainable with binary readout is lacking. It is commonly assumed that the binary resolution is $\text{pitch}/\sqrt{12}$, but this is generally a worst case upper limit. In this paper we study, using simulation, the best achievable resolution for minimum ionizing particles in binary readout pixels. A wide range of incident angles and pixel sizes are simulated with a standalone code, using the Bichsel model for charge deposition. The results show how the resolution depends on angles and sensor geometry. Until the pixel pitch becomes so small as to be comparable to the distance between energy deposits in silicon, the resolution is always better, and in some cases much better, than $\text{pitch}/\sqrt{12}$.
  • Particle identification using the energy loss in silicon detectors is a powerful technique for probing the Standard Model (SM) as well as searching for new particles beyond the SM. Traditionally, such techniques use the truncated mean of the energy loss on multiple layers, in order to mitigate heavy tails in the charge fluctuation distribution. We show that the optimal scheme using the charge in multiple layers significantly outperforms the truncated mean. Truncation itself does not significantly degrade performance and the optimal classifier is well-approximated by a linear combination of the truncated mean and truncated variance.
  • Jet substructure has emerged to play a central role at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where it has provided numerous innovative new ways to search for new physics and to probe the Standard Model, particularly in extreme regions of phase space. In this article we focus on a review of the development and use of state-of-the-art jet substructure techniques by the ATLAS and CMS experiments. ALICE and LHCb have been probing fragmentation functions since the start of the LHC and have also recently started studying other jet substructure techniques. It is likely that in the near future all LHC collaborations will make significant use of jet substructure and grooming techniques. Much of the work in this field in recent years has been galvanized by the Boost Workshop Series, which continues to inspire fruitful collaborations between experimentalists and theorists. We hope that this review will prove a useful introduction and reference to experimental aspects of jet substructure at the LHC. A companion overview of recent progress in theory and machine learning approaches is given in 1709.04464, the complete review will be submitted to Reviews of Modern Physics.
  • A persistent challenge in practical classification tasks is that labelled training sets are not always available. In particle physics, this challenge is surmounted by the use of simulations. These simulations accurately reproduce most features of data, but cannot be trusted to capture all of the complex correlations exploitable by modern machine learning methods. Recent work in weakly supervised learning has shown that simple, low-dimensional classifiers can be trained using only the impure mixtures present in data. Here, we demonstrate that complex, high-dimensional classifiers can also be trained on impure mixtures using weak supervision techniques, with performance comparable to what could be achieved with pure samples. Using weak supervision will therefore allow us to avoid relying exclusively on simulations for high-dimensional classification. This work opens the door to a new regime whereby complex models are trained directly on data, providing direct access to probe the underlying physics.
  • Pileup involves the contamination of the energy distribution arising from the primary collision of interest (leading vertex) by radiation from soft collisions (pileup). We develop a new technique for removing this contamination using machine learning and convolutional neural networks. The network takes as input the energy distribution of charged leading vertex particles, charged pileup particles, and all neutral particles and outputs the energy distribution of particles coming from leading vertex alone. The PUMML algorithm performs remarkably well at eliminating pileup distortion on a wide range of simple and complex jet observables. We test the robustness of the algorithm in a number of ways and discuss how the network can be trained directly on data.
  • The precise modeling of subatomic particle interactions and propagation through matter is paramount for the advancement of nuclear and particle physics searches and precision measurements. The most computationally expensive step in the simulation pipeline of a typical experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the detailed modeling of the full complexity of physics processes that govern the motion and evolution of particle showers inside calorimeters. We introduce \textsc{CaloGAN}, a new fast simulation technique based on generative adversarial networks (GANs). We apply these neural networks to the modeling of electromagnetic showers in a longitudinally segmented calorimeter, and achieve speedup factors comparable to or better than existing full simulation techniques on CPU ($100\times$-$1000\times$) and even faster on GPU (up to $\sim10^5\times$). There are still challenges for achieving precision across the entire phase space, but our solution can reproduce a variety of geometric shower shape properties of photons, positrons and charged pions. This represents a significant stepping stone toward a full neural network-based detector simulation that could save significant computing time and enable many analyses now and in the future.
  • Physicists at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) rely on detailed simulations of particle collisions to build expectations of what experimental data may look like under different theory modeling assumptions. Petabytes of simulated data are needed to develop analysis techniques, though they are expensive to generate using existing algorithms and computing resources. The modeling of detectors and the precise description of particle cascades as they interact with the material in the calorimeter are the most computationally demanding steps in the simulation pipeline. We therefore introduce a deep neural network-based generative model to enable high-fidelity, fast, electromagnetic calorimeter simulation. There are still challenges for achieving precision across the entire phase space, but our current solution can reproduce a variety of particle shower properties while achieving speed-up factors of up to 100,000$\times$. This opens the door to a new era of fast simulation that could save significant computing time and disk space, while extending the reach of physics searches and precision measurements at the LHC and beyond.
  • Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current ATLAS detector and its planned upgrade. As the detectors in closest proximity to the interaction point, they will be exposed to a significant amount of radiation: prior to the HL-LHC, the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of $10^{15}$ 1 MeV $n_\mathrm{eq}/\mathrm{cm}^2$ and the HL-LHC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. This talk presents a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS Pixel sensors for the first time. After a thorough description of the setup, predictions for basic pixel cluster properties are presented alongside first validation studies with Run 2 collision data.
  • The pixel detectors for the High Luminosity upgrades of the ATLAS and CMS detectors will preserve digitized charge information in spite of extremely high hit rates. Both circuit physical size and output bandwidth will limit the number of bits to which charge can be digitized and stored. We therefore study the effect of the number of bits used for digitization and storage on single and multi-particle cluster resolution, efficiency, classification, and particle identification. We show how performance degrades as fewer bits are used to digitize and to store charge. We find that with limited charge information (4 bits), one can achieve near optimal performance on a variety of tasks.
  • Jet substructure has emerged to play a central role at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where it has provided numerous innovative new ways to search for new physics and to probe the Standard Model in extreme regions of phase space. In this article we provide a comprehensive review of state of the art theoretical and machine learning developments in jet substructure. This article is meant both as a pedagogical introduction, covering the key physical principles underlying the calculation of jet substructure observables, the development of new observables, and cutting edge machine learning techniques for jet substructure, as well as a comprehensive reference for experts. We hope that it will prove a useful introduction to the exciting and rapidly developing field of jet substructure at the LHC.
  • The strong force is responsible for a rich set of phenomena that can be probed using a variety of techniques over a wide energy and angular range at the Large Hadron Collider. This talk reports on the latest results from the ATLAS Collaboration that measure the high energy, wide angle, collinear, and soft regimes of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). There is also an important connection between QCD at high energies and electroweak phenomena including massive gauge bosons as well as photons.
  • Modern machine learning techniques can be used to construct powerful models for difficult collider physics problems. In many applications, however, these models are trained on imperfect simulations due to a lack of truth-level information in the data, which risks the model learning artifacts of the simulation. In this paper, we introduce the paradigm of classification without labels (CWoLa) in which a classifier is trained to distinguish statistical mixtures of classes, which are common in collider physics. Crucially, neither individual labels nor class proportions are required, yet we prove that the optimal classifier in the CWoLa paradigm is also the optimal classifier in the traditional fully-supervised case where all label information is available. After demonstrating the power of this method in an analytical toy example, we consider a realistic benchmark for collider physics: distinguishing quark- versus gluon-initiated jets using mixed quark/gluon training samples. More generally, CWoLa can be applied to any classification problem where labels or class proportions are unknown or simulations are unreliable, but statistical mixtures of the classes are available.
  • As machine learning algorithms become increasingly sophisticated to exploit subtle features of the data, they often become more dependent on simulations. This paper presents a new approach called weakly supervised classification in which class proportions are the only input into the machine learning algorithm. Using one of the most challenging binary classification tasks in high energy physics - quark versus gluon tagging - we show that weakly supervised classification can match the performance of fully supervised algorithms. Furthermore, by design, the new algorithm is insensitive to any mis-modeling of discriminating features in the data by the simulation. Weakly supervised classification is a general procedure that can be applied to a wide variety of learning problems to boost performance and robustness when detailed simulations are not reliable or not available.
  • We provide a bridge between generative modeling in the Machine Learning community and simulated physical processes in High Energy Particle Physics by applying a novel Generative Adversarial Network (GAN) architecture to the production of jet images -- 2D representations of energy depositions from particles interacting with a calorimeter. We propose a simple architecture, the Location-Aware Generative Adversarial Network, that learns to produce realistic radiation patterns from simulated high energy particle collisions. The pixel intensities of GAN-generated images faithfully span over many orders of magnitude and exhibit the desired low-dimensional physical properties (i.e., jet mass, n-subjettiness, etc.). We shed light on limitations, and provide a novel empirical validation of image quality and validity of GAN-produced simulations of the natural world. This work provides a base for further explorations of GANs for use in faster simulation in High Energy Particle Physics.
  • Numerical inversion is a general detector calibration technique that is independent of the underlying spectrum. This procedure is formalized and important statistical properties are presented, using high energy jets at the Large Hadron Collider as an example setting. In particular, numerical inversion is inherently biased and common approximations to the calibrated jet energy tend to over-estimate the resolution. Analytic approximations to the closure and calibrated resolutions are demonstrated to effectively predict the full forms under realistic conditions. Finally, extensions of numerical inversion are presented which can reduce the inherent biases. These methods will be increasingly important to consider with degraded resolution at low jet energies due to a much higher instantaneous luminosity in the near future.
  • Building on the notion of a particle physics detector as a camera and the collimated streams of high energy particles, or jets, it measures as an image, we investigate the potential of machine learning techniques based on deep learning architectures to identify highly boosted W bosons. Modern deep learning algorithms trained on jet images can out-perform standard physically-motivated feature driven approaches to jet tagging. We develop techniques for visualizing how these features are learned by the network and what additional information is used to improve performance. This interplay between physically-motivated feature driven tools and supervised learning algorithms is general and can be used to significantly increase the sensitivity to discover new particles and new forces, and gain a deeper understanding of the physics within jets.
  • Quarks and gluons are the fundamental building blocks of matter responsible for most of the visible energy density in the universe. However, they cannot be directly observed due to the confining nature of the strong force. The LHC uses pp collisions to probe the highest energy reactions involving quarks and gluons happening at the smallest distance scales ever studied in a terrestrial laboratory. The quantum properties of the initiating partons are encoded in the distribution of energy inside and around jets. These quantum properties of jets (QPJ) can be used to study the high energy nature of the strong force and provide a way to tag the hadronic decays of heavy boosted particles. The ATLAS detector is well-suited to perform measurements of the structure of high energy jets. A variety of novel techniques utilizing the unique capabilities of the ATLAS calorimeter and tracking detectors are introduced in order to probe the experimental and theoretical limits of the QPJ. Quarks and gluons may also be the key to understanding fundamental problems with the SM. In particular, the top quark has a unique relationship with the newly discovered Higgs boson and as such could be a portal to discovering new particles. In many extensions of the SM, the top quark has a partner with similar properties. For example, a SUSY stop could solve The Hierarchy Problem. Miraculously, a SUSY neutralino could also account for the DM observed in the universe and may be copiously produced in stop decays. High-energy top quarks from stops result in jets with a rich structure that can be identified using the techniques developed in the study of the QPJ. While there is no significant evidence for stop production at the LHC, the stringent limits established by this search have important implications for SUSY and other models. (adapted from the original to save characters)
  • Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets. To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets, are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.
  • This paper shows that the capacity region of the continuous-time Poisson broadcast channel is achieved via superposition coding for most channel parameter values. Interestingly, the channel in some subset of these parameter values does not belong to any of the existing classes of broadcast channels for which superposition coding is optimal (e.g., degraded, less noisy, more capable). In particular, we introduce the notion of effectively less noisy broadcast channel and show that it implies less noisy but is not in general implied by more capable. For the rest of the channel parameter values, we show that there is a gap between Marton's inner bound and the UV outer bound.
  • Compressed mass spectra are generally more difficult to identify than spectra with large splittings. In particular, gluino pair production with four high energy top or bottom quarks leaves a striking signature in a detector. However, if any of the mass splittings are compressed, the power of traditional techniques may deteriorate. Searches for direct stop/sbottom pair production can fill in the gaps. As a demonstration, we show that for $\tilde{g}\rightarrow t\tilde{t}_1$ and $m_{\tilde{t}_1}\sim m_{\tilde{\chi}_1^0}$, limits on the stop mass at 8 TeV can be extended by least 300 GeV for a 1.1 TeV gluino using a $pp\rightarrow \tilde{t}_1\tilde{t}_1$ search. At 13 TeV, the effective cross section for the gluino mediated process is twice the direct stop/sbottom pair production cross section, suggesting that direct stop/sbottom searches could be sensitive to discover new physics earlier than expected.