• We introduce an algorithm to estimate the redshift distribution of a sample of galaxies selected photometrically given a subsample with measured spectroscopic redshifts. The approach uses a non-parametric Voronoi tessellation density estimator to interpolate the galaxy distribution in the redshift and photometric color space. We test the method on a mock dataset with a known color-redshift distribution. We find that the Voronoi tessellation estimator performs well at reconstructing the tails of the redshift distribution of individual galaxies and gives unbiased estimates of the first and second moments. The source code is publicly available at http://bitbucket.org/bengranett/tailz.
  • Cosmic structures leave an imprint on the microwave background radiation through the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. We construct a template map of the linear signal using the SDSS-III Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Survey at redshift 0.43 < z < 0.65. We verify the imprint of this map on the Planck CMB temperature map at the 97% confidence level and show consistency with the density-temperature cross-correlation measurement. Using this ISW reconstruction as a template we investigate the presence of ISW sources and further examine the properties of the Granett-Neyrinck-Szapudi supervoid and supercluster catalogue. We characterise the three-dimensional density profiles of these structures for the first time and demonstrate that they are significant structures. Model fits demonstrate that the supervoids are elongated along the line-of-sight and we suggest that this special orientation may be picked out by the void-finding algorithm in photometric redshift space. We measure the mean temperature profiles in Planck maps from public void and cluster catalogues. In an attempt to maximise the stacked ISW signal we construct a new catalogue of super-structures based upon local peaks and troughs of the gravitational potential. However, we do not find a significant correlation between these structures and the CMB temperature.
  • We analyze publicly available void catalogs of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 10 at redshifts $0.4<z<0.7$. The first goal of this paper is to extend the Cosmic Microwave Background stacking analysis of previous spectroscopic void samples at $z<0.4$. In addition, the DR10 void catalog provides the first chance to spectroscopically probe the volume of the Granett et al. (2008) supervoid catalog that constitutes the only set of voids which has shown a significant detection of a cross-correlation signal between void locations and average CMB chill. We found that the positions of voids identified in the spectroscopic DR10 galaxy catalog typically do not coincide with the locations of the Granett et al. supervoids in the overlapping volume, in spite of the presence of large underdense regions of high void-density in DR10. This failure to locate the same structures with spectroscopic redshifts may arise due to systematic differences in the properties of voids detected in photometric and spectroscopic samples. In the stacking measurement, we first find a $\Delta T = - 11.5 \pm 3.7~\mu K$ imprint for 35 of the 50 Granett et al. supervoids available in the DR10 volume. For the DR10 void catalog, lacking a prior on the number of voids to be considered in the stacking analysis, we find that the correlation measurement is fully consistent with no correlation. However, the measurement peaks with amplitude $\Delta T = - 9.8 \pm 4.8~\mu K$ for the a posteriori-selected 44 largest voids of size $R>65~Mpc/h$ that does match in terms of amplitude and number of structures the Granett et al. observation, although at different void positions.
  • We use the WISE-2MASS infrared galaxy catalog matched with Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) galaxies to search for a supervoid in the direction of the Cosmic Microwave Background Cold Spot. Our imaging catalog has median redshift $z\simeq 0.14$, and we obtain photometric redshifts from PS1 optical colours to create a tomographic map of the galaxy distribution. The radial profile centred on the Cold Spot shows a large low density region, extending over 10's of degrees. Motivated by previous Cosmic Microwave Background results, we test for underdensities within two angular radii, $5^\circ$, and $15^\circ$. The counts in photometric redshift bins show significantly low densities at high detection significance, $\gtrsim 5 \sigma$ and $\gtrsim 6 \sigma$, respectively, for the two fiducial radii. The line-of-sight position of the deepest region of the void is $z\simeq 0.15-0.25$. Our data, combined with an earlier measurement by Granett et al. 2010, are consistent with a large $R_{\rm void}=(220 \pm 50) h^{-1}Mpc $ supervoid with $\delta_{m} \simeq -0.14 \pm 0.04$ centered at $z=0.22\pm0.03$. Such a supervoid, constituting at least a $\simeq 3.3\sigma$ fluctuation in a Gaussian distribution of the $\Lambda CDM$ model, is a plausible cause for the Cold Spot.
  • We use a WISE-2MASS-Pan-STARRS1 galaxy catalog to search for a supervoid in the direction of the Cosmic Microwave Background Cold Spot. We obtain photometric redshifts using our multicolor data set to create a tomographic map of the galaxy distribution. The radial density profile centred on the Cold Spot shows a large low density region, extending over 10's of degrees. Motivated by previous Cosmic Microwave Background results, we test for underdensities within two angular radii, $5^\circ$, and $15^\circ$. Our data, combined with an earlier measurement by Granett et al 2010, are consistent with a large $R_{\rm void}=(192 \pm 15)h^{-1} Mpc $ $(2\sigma)$ supervoid with $\delta \simeq -0.13 \pm 0.03$ centered at $z=0.22\pm0.01$. Such a supervoid, constituting a $\sim3.5 \sigma$ fluctuation in the $\Lambda CDM$ model, is a plausible cause for the Cold Spot.
  • Standard inflationary hot big bang cosmology predicts small fluctuations in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) with isotropic Gaussian statistics. All measurements support the standard theory, except for a few anomalies discovered in the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe maps and confirmed recently by the Planck satellite. The Cold Spot is one of the most significant of such anomalies, and the leading explanation of it posits a large void that imprints this extremely cold area via the linear Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect due to the decay of gravitational potentials over cosmic time, or via the Rees-Sciama (RS) effect due to late-time non-linear evolution. Despite several observational campaigns targeting the Cold Spot region, to date no suitably large void was found at higher redshifts $z > 0.3$. Here we report the detection of an $R =(192 \pm 15) h^{-1}Mpc$ size supervoid of depth $\delta = -0.13 \pm 0.03$, and centred at redshift $z = 0.22$. This supervoid, possibly the largest ever found, is large enough to significantly affect the CMB via the non-linear RS effect, as shown in our Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi framework. This discovery presents the first plausible explanation for any of the physical CMB anomalies, and raises the possibility that local large-scale structure could be responsible for other anomalies as well.
  • We measured the cross-correlation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) 7 year temperature map and the full sky data release of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) galaxy map. Using careful mapmaking and masking techniques we find a positive cross-correlation signal. The results are fully consistent with a Lambda-CDM Universe, although not statistically significant. Our findings are robust against changing the galactic latitude cut from |b|>10 to |b|>20 and no color dependence was detected when we used WMAP Q, V or W maps. We confirm higher significance correlations found in the preliminary data release. The change in significance is consistent with cosmic variance.
  • We use the galaxy angular power spectrum at $z\sim0.5-1.2$ from the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope Legacy Survey Wide fields (CFHTLS-Wide) to constrain separately the total neutrino mass $\sum{m_\nu}$ and the effective number of neutrino species $N_{\rm{eff}}$. This survey has recently benefited from an accurate calibration of the redshift distribution, allowing new measurements of the (non-linear) matter power spectrum in a unique range of scales and redshifts sensitive to neutrino free streaming. Our analysis makes use of a recent model for the effect of neutrinos on the weakly non-linear matter power spectrum derived from accurate N-body simulations. We show that CFHTLS, combined with WMAP7 and a prior on the Hubble constant provides an upper limit of $\sum{m_\nu}<0.29\,$eV and $N_{\rm{eff}} =4.17^{+1.62}_{-1.26}$ (2$\,\sigma$ confidence levels). If we omit smaller scales which may be affected by non-linearities, these constraints become $\sum{m_\nu}<0.41\,$eV and $N_{\rm{eff}} =3.98^{+2.02}_{-1.20}$ (2$\,\sigma$ confidence levels). Finally we show that the addition of other large scale structures probes can further improve these constraints, demonstrating that high redshift large volumes surveys such as CFHTLS are complementary to other cosmological probes of the neutrino mass.
  • We estimated the cross-power spectra of a galaxy sample from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) survey with the 7-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) temperature anisotropy maps. A conservatively-selected galaxy sample covers ~13000sq.deg, with a median redshift of z=0.15. Cross-power spectra show correlations between the two data sets with no discernible dependence on the WMAP Q, V and W frequency bands. We interpret these results in terms of the the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect: for the |b|>20 deg sample at l=6-87, we measure the amplitude (normalized to be 1 for vanilla LambdaCDM expectation) of the signal to be 3.4+-1.1, i.e., 3.1 sigma detection. We discuss other possibilities, but at face value, the detection of the linear ISW effect in a flat universe is caused by large scale decaying potentials, a sign of accelerated expansion driven by Dark Energy.
  • The Cold Spot on the Cosmic Microwave Background could arise due to a supervoid at low redshift through the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. We imaged the region with MegaCam on the Canada-France-Hawai'i Telescope and present galaxy counts in photometric redshift bins. We rule out the existence of a 100Mpc radius spherical supervoid with underdensity delta=-0.3 at 0.5<z<0.9 at high significance. The data are consistent with an underdensity at low redshift, but the fluctuations are within the range of cosmic variance and the low density areas are not contiguous on the sky. Thus, we find no strong evidence for a supervoid. We cannot resolve voids smaller than 50Mpc radius; however, these can only make a minor contribution to the CMB temperature decrement.
  • We construct a map of the time derivative of the gravitational potential traced by SDSS Luminous Red Galaxies. The potential decays on large scales due to cosmic acceleration, leaving an imprint on cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation through the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect. With a template fit, we directly measure this signature on the CMB at a 2-sigma confidence level. The measurement is consistent with the cross-correlation statistic, strengthening the claim that dark energy is indeed the cause of the correlation. This new approach potentially simplifies the cosmological interpretation. Our constructed linear ISW map shows no evidence for degree-scale cold and hot spots associated with supervoid and supercluster structures. This suggests that the linear ISW effect in a concordance Lambda-CDM cosmology is insufficient to explain the strong CMB imprints from these structures that we previously reported.
  • We measure hot and cold spots on the microwave background associated with supercluster and supervoid structures identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Luminous Red Galaxy catalog. The structures give a compelling visual imprint, with a mean temperature deviation of 9.6 +/- 2.2 microK, i.e. above 4 sigma. We interpret this as a detection of the late-time Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, in which cosmic acceleration from dark energy causes gravitational potentials to decay, heating or cooling photons passing through density crests or troughs. In a flat universe, the linear ISW effect is a direct signal of dark energy.
  • The observed apparent acceleration of the universe is usually attributed to negative pressure from a mysterious dark energy. This acceleration causes the gravitational potential to decay, heating or cooling photons travelling through crests or troughs of large-scale matter density fluctuations. This phenomenon, the late-time integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, has been detected, albeit at low significance, by cross-correlating various galaxy surveys with the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Recently, the best evidence has come from the statistical combination of results from multiple correlated galaxy data sets. Here we show that vast structures identified in a galaxy survey project an image onto the CMB; stacking regions aligned with superclusters produces a hot spot, and supervoids, a cold spot. At over 4 sigma, this is the clearest evidence of the ISW effect to date. For the first time, our findings pin the effect to discrete structures. The ISW signal from supervoids and superclusters can be combined with other cosmological probes to constrain dark energy and cosmological parameters. In addition, our findings make it more plausible that the extreme Cold Spot and other anomalies in the CMB are caused by supervoids.
  • Motivated by the recognition that variation in the optical transmission of the atmosphere is probably the main limitation to the precision of ground-based CCD measurements of celestial fluxes, we review the physical processes that attenuate the passage of light through the Earth's atmosphere. The next generation of astronomical surveys, such as PanSTARRS and LSST, will greatly benefit from dedicated apparatus to obtain atmospheric transmission data that can be associated with each survey image. We review and compare various approaches to this measurement problem, including photometry, spectroscopy, and LIDAR. In conjunction with careful measurements of instrumental throughput, atmospheric transmission measurements should allow next-generation imaging surveys to produce photometry of unprecedented precision. Our primary concerns are the real-time determination of aerosol scattering and absorption by water along the line of sight, both of which can vary over the course of a night's observations.