• We extend the work in New J. Phys. 19, 103015 (2017) by deriving a lower bound for the minimum time necessary to implement a unitary transformation on a generic, closed quantum system with an arbitrary number of classical control fields. This bound is explicitly analyzed for a specific N-level system similar to those used to represent simple models of an atom, or the first excitation sector of a Heisenberg spin chain, both of which are of interest in quantum control for quantum computation. Specifically, it is shown that the resultant bound depends on the dimension of the system, and on the number of controls used to implement a specific target unitary operation. The value of the bound determined numerically, and an estimate of the true minimum gate time are systematically compared for a range of system dimension and number of controls; special attention is drawn to the relationship between these two variables. It is seen that the bound captures the scaling of the minimum time well for the systems studied, and quantitatively is correct in the order of magnitude.
  • We establish three tractable, jointly sufficient conditions for the control landscapes of non-linear control systems to be trap free comparable to those now well known in quantum control. In particular, our results encompass end-point control problems for a general class of non-linear control systems of the form of a linear time invariant term with an additional state dependent non-linear term. Trap free landscapes ensure that local optimization methods (such as gradient ascent) can achieve monotonic convergence to effective control schemes in both simulation and practice. Within a large class of non-linear control problems, each of the three conditions is shown to hold for all but a null set of cases. Furthermore, we establish a Lipschitz condition for two of these assumptions; under specific circumstances, we explicitly find the associated Lipschitz constants. A detailed numerical investigation using the D-MOPRH control optimization algorithm is presented for a specific family of systems which meet the conditions for possessing trap free control landscapes. The results obtained confirm the trap free nature of the landscapes of such systems.
  • In this article we present a detailed description of an electron in a uniform magnetic field evolving under the Schr\"odinger equation using ladder operators. Based on this analysis, we describe the same physical system using the Dirac equation, known from relativistic quantum mechanics. The main differences between these two quantum mechanical approaches are discussed and we observe specifically how the relativistic phenomena modify the description of this particular quantum system.
  • In this work we derive a lower bound for the minimum time required to implement a target unitary transformation through a classical time-dependent field in a closed quantum system. The bound depends on the target gate, the strength of the internal Hamiltonian and the highest permitted control field amplitude. These findings reveal some properties of the reachable set of operations, explicitly analyzed for a single qubit. Moreover, for fully controllable systems, we identify a lower bound for the time at which all unitary gates become reachable. We use numerical gate optimization in order to study the tightness of the obtained bounds. It is shown that in the single qubit case our analytical findings describe the relationship between the highest control field amplitude and the minimum evolution time remarkably well. Finally, we discuss both challenges and ways forward for obtaining tighter bounds for higher dimensional systems, offering a discussion about the mathematical form and the physical meaning of the bound.
  • We study the maximum speed of quantum computation and how it is affected by limitations on physical resources. We show how the resulting concepts generalize to a broader class of physical models of computation within dynamical systems and introduce a specific algebraic structure representing these speed limits. We derive a family of quantum speed limit results in resource-constrained quantum systems with pure states and a finite dimensional state space, by using a geometric method based on right invariant action functionals on $SU(N)$. We show that when the action functional is bi-invariant, the minimum time for implementing any quantum gate using a potentially time-dependent Hamiltonian is equal to the minimum time when using a constant Hamiltonian, thus constant Hamiltonians are time optimal for these constraints. We give an explicit formula for the time in these cases, in terms of the resource constraint. We show how our method produces a rich family of speed limit results, of which the generalized Margolus--Levitin theorem and the Mandelstam--Tamm inequality are special cases. We discuss the broader context of geometric approaches to speed limits in physical computation, including the way geometric approaches to quantum speed limits are a model for physical speed limits to computation arising from a limited resource.
  • A common goal in the sciences is optimization of an objective function by selecting control variables such that a desired outcome is achieved. This scenario can be expressed in terms of a control landscape of an objective considered as a function of the control variables. At the most basic level, it is known that the vast majority of quantum control landscapes possess no traps, whose presence would hinder reaching the objective. This paper reviews and extends the quantum control landscape assessment, presenting evidence that the same highly favorable landscape features exist in many other domains of science. The implications of this broader evidence are discussed. Specifically, control landscape examples from quantum mechanics, chemistry, and evolutionary biology are presented. Despite the obvious differences, commonalities between these areas are highlighted within a unified mathematical framework. This mathematical framework is driven by the wide ranging experimental evidence on the ease of finding optimal controls (in terms of the required algorithmic search effort beyond laboratory set up overhead). The full scope and implications of this observed common control behavior pose an open question for assessment in further work.
  • A proof that almost all quantum systems have trap free (that is, free from local optima) landscapes is presented for a large and physically general class of quantum system. This result offers an explanation for why gradient methods succeed so frequently in quantum control in both theory and practice. The role of singular controls is analyzed using geometric tools in the case of the control of the propagator of closed finite dimension systems. This type of control field has been implicated as a source of landscape traps. The conditions under which singular controls can introduce traps, and thus interrupt the progress of a control optimization, are discussed and a geometrical characterization of the issue is presented. It is shown that a control being singular is not sufficient to cause a control optimization progress to halt and sufficient conditions for a trap free landscape are presented. It is further shown that the local surjectivity axiom of landscape analysis can be refined to the condition that the end-point map is transverse to each of the level sets of the fidelity function. This novel condition is shown to be sufficient for a quantum system's landscape to be trap free. The control landscape for a quantum system is shown to be trap free for all but a null set of Hamiltonians using a novel geometric technique based on the parametric transversality theorem. Numerical evidence confirming this is also presented. This result is the analogue of the work of Altifini, wherein it is shown that controllability holds for all but a null set of quantum systems in the dipole approximation. The presented results indicate that by-and-large limited control resources are the most physically relevant source of landscape traps.
  • We investigate the control landscapes of closed, finite level quantum systems beyond the dipole approximation by including a polarizability term in the Hamiltonian. Theoretical analysis is presented for the $n$ level case and formulas for singular controls, which are candidates for landscape traps, are compared to their analogues in the dipole approximation. A numerical analysis of the existence of traps in control landscapes beyond the dipole approximation is made in the four level case. A numerical exploration of these control landscapes is achieved by generating many random Hamiltonians which include a term quadratic in a single control field. The landscapes of such systems are found numerically to be trap free in general. This extends a great body of recent work on typical landscapes of quantum systems where the dipole approximation is made. We further investigate the relationship between the magnitude of the polarizability and the magnitude of the controls resulting from optimization. It is shown numerically that including a polarizability term in an otherwise uncontrollable system removes traps from the landscapes of a specific family of systems by restoring controllability. We numerically assess the effect of a random polarizability term on the know example of a three level system with a second order trap in its control landscape. It is found that the addition of polarizability removes the trap from the landscape. The implications for laboratory control are discussed.
  • We analyse the optimal times for implementing unitary quantum gates in a constrained finite dimensional controlled quantum system. The family of constraints studied is that the permitted set of (time dependent) Hamiltonians is the unit ball of a norm induced by an inner product on su(n). We also consider a generalisation of this to arbitrary norms. We construct a Randers metric, by applying a theorem of Shen on Zermelo navigation, the geodesics of which are the time optimal trajectories compatible with the prescribed constraint. We determine all geodesics and the corresponding time optimal Hamiltonian for a specific constraint on the control i.e. k (Tr(Hc(t)^2) = 1 for any given value of k > 0. Some of the results of Carlini et. al. are re-derived using alternative methods. A first order system of differential equations for the optimal Hamiltonian is obtained and shown to be of the form of the Euler Poincare equations. We illustrate that this method can form a methodology for determining which physical substrates are effective at supporting the implementation of fast quantum computation.
  • We derive a family of quantum speed limit results in time independent systems with pure states and a finite dimensional state space, by using a geometric method based on right invariant action functionals on SU(N). The method relates speed limits for implementing quantum gates to bounds on orthogonality times. We reproduce the known result of the Margolus-Levitin theorem, and a known generalisation of the Margolis-Levitin theorem, as special cases of our method, which produces a rich family of other similar speed limit formulas corresponding to positive homogeneous functions on su(n). We discuss the general relationship between speed limits for controlling a quantum state and a system's time evolution operator.
  • We use a specific geometric method to determine speed limits to the implementation of quantum gates in controlled quantum systems that have a specific class of constrained control functions. We achieve this by applying a recent theorem of Shen, which provides a connection between time optimal navigation on Riemannian manifolds and the geodesics of a certain Finsler metric of Randers type. We use the lengths of these geodesics to derive the optimal implementation times (under the assumption of constant control fields) for an arbitrary quantum operation (on a finite dimensional Hilbert space), and explicitly calculate the result for the case of a controlled single spin system in a magnetic field, and a swap gate in a Heisenberg spin chain.