• We present a new perspective on the Schottky problem that links numerical computing with tropical geometry. The task is to decide whether a symmetric matrix defines a Jacobian, and, if so, to compute the curve and its canonical embedding. We offer solutions and their implementations in genus four, both classically and tropically. The locus of cographic matroids arises from tropicalizing the Schottky-Igusa modular form.
  • A gaussoid is a combinatorial structure that encodes independence in probability and statistics, just like matroids encode independence in linear algebra. The gaussoid axioms of Lnenicka and Mat\'us are equivalent to compatibility with certain quadratic relations among principal and almost-principal minors of a symmetric matrix. We develop the geometric theory of gaussoids, based on the Lagrangian Grassmannian and its symmetries. We introduce oriented gaussoids and valuated gaussoids, thus connecting to real and tropical geometry. We classify small realizable and non-realizable gaussoids. Positive gaussoids are as nice as positroids: they are all realizable via graphical models.
  • The signature of a parametric curve is a sequence of tensors whose entries are iterated integrals. This construction is central to the theory of rough paths in stochastic analysis. It is here examined through the lens of algebraic geometry. We introduce varieties of signature tensors for both deterministic and random paths. For the former, we focus on piecewise linear paths, on polynomial paths, and on varieties derived from free nilpotent Lie groups. For the latter, we focus on Brownian motion and its mixtures.
  • Consider the problem of minimizing a quadratic objective subject to quadratic equations. We study the semialgebraic region of objective functions for which this problem is solved by its semidefinite relaxation. For the Euclidean distance problem, this is a bundle of spectrahedral shadows surrounding the given variety. We characterize the algebraic boundary of this region and we derive a formula for its degree.
  • We seek to determine a real algebraic variety from a fixed finite subset of points. Existing methods are studied and new methods are developed. Our focus lies on aspects of topology and algebraic geometry, such as dimension and defining polynomials. All algorithms are tested on a range of datasets and made available in a Julia package.
  • We determine the Euclidean distance degree of a projective toric variety. This extends the formula of Matsui and Takeuchi for the degree of the $A$-discriminant in terms of Euler obstructions. Our primary goal is the development of reliable algorithmic tools for computing the points on a real toric variety that are closest to a given data point.
  • We present a computational study of smooth curves of degree six in the real projective plane. In the Rokhlin-Nikulin classification, there are 56 topological types, refined into 64 rigid isotopy classes. We developed software that determines the topological type of a given sextic and used it to compute empirical probability distributions on the various types. We list 64 explicit representatives with integer coefficients, and we perturb these to draw many samples from each class. This allows us to explore how many of the bitangents, inflection points and tensor eigenvectors are real. We also study the real tensor rank, the construction of quartic surfaces with prescribed topology, and the avoidance locus, which is the locus of all real lines that do not meet a given sextic. This is a union of up to 46 convex regions, bounded by the dual curve.
  • Visual events in computer vision are studied from the perspective of algebraic geometry. Given a sufficiently general curve or surface in 3-space, we consider the image or contour curve that arises by projecting from a viewpoint. Qualitative changes in that curve occur when the viewpoint crosses the visual event surface. We examine the components of this ruled surface, and observe that these coincide with the iterated singular loci of the coisotropic hypersurfaces associated with the original curve or surface. We derive formulas, due to Salmon and Petitjean, for the degrees of these surfaces, and show how to compute exact representations for all visual event surfaces using algebraic methods.
  • The rational camera model recently introduced in [19] provides a general methodology for studying abstract nonlinear imaging systems and their multi-view geometry. This paper builds on this framework to study "physical realizations" of rational cameras. More precisely, we give an explicit account of the mapping between between physical visual rays and image points (missing in the original description), which allows us to give simple analytical expressions for direct and inverse projections. We also consider "primitive" camera models, that are orbits under the action of various projective transformations, and lead to a general notion of intrinsic parameters. The methodology is general, but it is illustrated concretely by an in-depth study of two-slit cameras, that we model using pairs of linear projections. This simple analytical form allows us to describe models for the corresponding primitive cameras, to introduce intrinsic parameters with a clear geometric meaning, and to define an epipolar tensor characterizing two-view correspondences. In turn, this leads to new algorithms for structure from motion and self-calibration.
  • Shape-constrained density estimation is an important topic in mathematical statistics. We focus on densities on $\mathbb{R}^d$ that are log-concave, and we study geometric properties of the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) for weighted samples. Cule, Samworth, and Stewart showed that the logarithm of the optimal log-concave density is piecewise linear and supported on a regular subdivision of the samples. This defines a map from the space of weights to the set of regular subdivisions of the samples, i.e. the face poset of their secondary polytope. We prove that this map is surjective. In fact, every regular subdivision arises in the MLE for some set of weights with positive probability, but coarser subdivisions appear to be more likely to arise than finer ones. To quantify these results, we introduce a continuous version of the secondary polytope, whose dual we name the Samworth body. This article establishes a new link between geometric combinatorics and nonparametric statistics, and it suggests numerous open problems.
  • The real rank two locus of an algebraic variety is the closure of the union of all secant lines spanned by real points. We seek a semi-algebraic description of this set. Its algebraic boundary consists of the tangential variety and the edge variety. Our study of Segre and Veronese varieties yields a characterization of tensors of real rank two.
  • We prove that all moment varieties of univariate Gaussian mixtures have the expected dimension. Our approach rests on intersection theory and Terracini's classification of defective surfaces. The analogous identifiability result is shown to be false for mixtures of Gaussians in dimension three and higher. Their moments up to third order define projective varieties that are defective. Our geometric study suggests an extension of the Alexander-Hirschowitz Theorem for Veronese varieties to the Gaussian setting.
  • We present a new insight into the systematic generation of minimal solvers in computer vision, which leads to smaller and faster solvers. Many minimal problem formulations are coupled sets of linear and polynomial equations where image measurements enter the linear equations only. We show that it is useful to solve such systems by first eliminating all the unknowns that do not appear in the linear equations and then extending solutions to the rest of unknowns. This can be generalized to fully non-linear systems by linearization via lifting. We demonstrate that this approach leads to more efficient solvers in three problems of partially calibrated relative camera pose computation with unknown focal length and/or radial distortion. Our approach also generates new interesting constraints on the fundamental matrices of partially calibrated cameras, which were not known before.
  • Structured low-rank approximation is the problem of minimizing a weighted Frobenius distance to a given matrix among all matrices of fixed rank in a linear space of matrices. We study exact solutions to this problem by way of computational algebraic geometry. A particular focus lies on Hankel matrices, Sylvester matrices and generic linear spaces.
  • This is an experimental case study in real algebraic geometry, aimed at computing the image of a semialgebraic subset of 3-space under a polynomial map into the plane. For general instances, the boundary of the image is given by two highly singular curves. We determine these curves and show how they demarcate the "flattened soccer ball". We explore cylindrical algebraic decompositions, by working through concrete examples. Maps onto convex polygons and connections to convex optimization are also discussed.
  • We present a new framework for multi-view geometry in computer vision. A camera is a mapping between $\mathbb{P}^3$ and a line congruence. This model, which ignores image planes and measurements, is a natural abstraction of traditional pinhole cameras. It includes two-slit cameras, pushbroom cameras, catadioptric cameras, and many more. We study the concurrent lines variety, which consists of $n$-tuples of lines in $\mathbb{P}^3$ that intersect at a point. Combining its equations with those of various congruences, we derive constraints for corresponding images in multiple views. We also study photographic cameras which use image measurements and are modeled as rational maps from $\mathbb{P}^3$ to $\mathbb{P}^2$ or $\mathbb{P}^1\times \mathbb{P}^1$.
  • This article discusses the design of the Apprenticeship Program at the Fields Institute, held 21 August - 3 September 2016. Six themes from combinatorial algebraic geometry were selected for the two weeks: curves, surfaces, Grassmannians, convexity, abelian combinatorics, parameters and moduli. The activities were structured into fitness, research and scholarship. Combinatorics and concrete computations with polynomials (and theta functions) empowers young scholars in algebraic geometry, and it helps them to connect with the historic roots of their field. We illustrate our perspective for the threefold obtained by blowing up six points in $\mathbb{P}^3$.
  • Nosocomial outbreaks of bacteria are well-documented. Based on these incidents, and the heavy usage of antibiotics in hospitals, it has been assumed that antibiotic resistance evolves in hospital environments. To test this assumption, we studied resistance phenotypes of bacteria collected from patient isolates at a community hospital over a 2.5-year period. A graphical model analysis shows no association between resistance and patient information other than time of arrival. This allows us to focus on time course data. We introduce a Hospital Transmission Model, based on negative binomial delay. Our main contribution is a statistical hypothesis test called the Nosocomial Evolution of Resistance Detector (NERD). It calculates the significance of resistance trends occurring in a hospital. It can inform hospital staff about the effects of various practices and interventions, can help detect clonal outbreaks, and is available as an R-package. We applied the NERD method to each of the 16 antibiotics in the study via 16 hypothesis tests. For 13 of the antibiotics, we found that the hospital environment had no significant effect upon the evolution of resistance; the hospital is merely a piece of the larger picture. The p-values obtained for the other three antibiotics (Cefepime, Ceftazidime and Gentamicin) indicate that particular care should be taken in hospital practices with these antibiotics. One of the three, Ceftazidime, was significant after accounting for multiple hypotheses, indicating a trend of decreased resistance for this drug.
  • The distortion varieties of a given projective variety are parametrized by duplicating coordinates and multiplying them with monomials. We study their degrees and defining equations. Exact formulas are obtained for the case of one-parameter distortions. These are based on Chow polytopes and Gr\"obner bases. Multi-parameter distortions are studied using tropical geometry. The motivation for distortion varieties comes from multi-view geometry in computer vision. Our theory furnishes a new framework for formulating and solving minimal problems for camera models with image distortion.
  • We study real ternary forms whose real rank equals the generic complex rank, and we characterize the semialgebraic set of sums of powers representations with that rank. Complete results are obtained for quadrics and cubics. For quintics we determine the real rank boundary: it is a hypersurface of degree 168. For quartics, sextics and septics we identify some of the components of the real rank boundary. The real varieties of sums of powers are stratified by discriminants that are derived from hyperdeterminants.
  • The Hurwitz form of a variety is the discriminant that characterizes linear spaces of complementary dimension which intersect the variety in fewer than degree many points. We study computational aspects of the Hurwitz form, relate this to the dual variety and Chow form, and show why reduced degenerations are special on the Hurwitz polytope.
  • The multiview variety from computer vision is generalized to images by $n$ cameras of points linked by a distance constraint. The resulting five-dimensional variety lives in a product of $2n$ projective planes. We determine defining polynomial equations, and we explore generalizations of this variety to scenarios of interest in applications.
  • We study the geometry of metrics and convexity structures on the space of phylogenetic trees, which is here realized as the tropical linear space of all \ ultrametrics. The ${\rm CAT}(0)$-metric of Billera-Holmes-Vogtman arises from the theory of orthant spaces. While its geodesics can be computed by the Owen-Provan algorithm, geodesic triangles are complicated. We show that the dimension of such a triangle can be arbitrarily high. Tropical convexity and the tropical metric behave better. They exhibit properties desirable for geometric statistics, such as geodesics of small depth.
  • Square matrices represent linear self-maps of vector spaces, and their eigenpoints are the fixed points of the induced map on projective space. Likewise, polynomial self-maps of a projective space are represented by tensors. We study the configuration of fixed points of a tensor or symmetric tensor.
  • Gaussian mixture models are central to classical statistics, widely used in the information sciences, and have a rich mathematical structure. We examine their maximum likelihood estimates through the lens of algebraic statistics. The MLE is not an algebraic function of the data, so there is no notion of ML degree for these models. The critical points of the likelihood function are transcendental, and there is no bound on their number, even for mixtures of two univariate Gaussians.