• Simple aerodynamic configurations under even modest conditions can exhibit complex flows with a wide range of temporal and spatial features. It has become common practice in the analysis of these flows to look for and extract physically important features, or modes, as a first step in the analysis. This step typically starts with a modal decomposition of an experimental or numerical dataset of the flow field, or of an operator relevant to the system. We describe herein some of the dominant techniques for accomplishing these modal decompositions and analyses that have seen a surge of activity in recent decades. For a non-expert, keeping track of recent developments can be daunting, and the intent of this document is to provide an introduction to modal analysis that is accessible to the larger fluid dynamics community. In particular, we present a brief overview of several of the well-established techniques and clearly lay the framework of these methods using familiar linear algebra. The modal analysis techniques covered in this paper include the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), balanced proper orthogonal decomposition (Balanced POD), dynamic mode decomposition (DMD), Koopman analysis, global linear stability analysis, and resolvent analysis.
  • The resolvent analysis of McKeon & Sharma (2010) recasts the Navier-Stokes equations into an input/output form in which the nonlinear term is treated as a forcing that acts upon the linear dynamics to yield a velocity response. The framework has shown promise with regards to producing low-dimensional representations of exact coherent states. Previous work has focused on a primitive variable output; here we show a velocity-vorticity formulation of the governing equations along with a Helmholtz decomposition of the nonlinear forcing term reveals a simplified input/output form in the resolvent analysis. This approach leads to an improved method for compact representations of exact coherent states for both forcing and response fields, with a significant reduction in degrees of freedom in comparison to the primitive variable approach.
  • The relationship between Koopman mode decomposition, resolvent mode decomposition and exact invariant solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations is clarified. The correspondence rests upon the invariance of the system operators under symmetry operations such as spatial translation. The usual interpretation of the Koopman operator is generalised to permit combinations of such operations, in addition to translation in time. This invariance is related to the spectrum of a spatio-temporal Koopman operator, which has a travelling wave interpretation. The relationship leads to a generalisation of dynamic mode decomposition, in which symmetry operations are applied to restrict the dynamic modes to span a subspace subject to those symmetries. The resolvent is interpreted as the mapping between the Koopman modes of the Reynolds stress divergence and the velocity field. It is shown that the singular vectors of the resolvent (the resolvent modes) are the optimal basis in which to express the velocity field Koopman modes where the latter are not a priori known.
  • We report that many exact invariant solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for both pipe and channel flows are well represented by just few modes of the model of McKeon & Sharma J. Fl. Mech. 658, 356 (2010). This model provides modes that act as a basis to decompose the velocity field, ordered by their amplitude of response to forcing arising from the interaction between scales. The model was originally derived from the Navier-Stokes equations to represent turbulent flows and has been used to explain coherent structure and to predict turbulent statistics. This establishes a surprising new link between the two distinct approaches to understanding turbulence.
  • An analytical framework for studying the logarithmic region of turbulent channels is formulated. We build on recent findings (Moarref et al., J. Fluid Mech., 734, 2013) that the velocity fluctuations in the logarithmic region can be decomposed into a weighted sum of geometrically self-similar resolvent modes. The resolvent modes and the weights represent the linear amplification mechanisms and the scaling influence of the nonlinear interactions in the Navier-Stokes equations (NSE), respectively (McKeon & Sharma, J. Fluid Mech., 658, 2010). Originating from the NSE, this framework provides an analytical support for Townsend's attached-eddy model. Our main result is that self-similarity enables order reduction in modeling the logarithmic region by establishing a quantitative link between the self-similar structures and the velocity spectra. Specifically, the energy intensities, the Reynolds stresses, and the energy budget are expressed in terms of the resolvent modes with speeds corresponding to the top of the logarithmic region. The weights of the triad modes -the modes that directly interact via the quadratic nonlinearity in the NSE- are coupled via the interaction coefficients that depend solely on the resolvent modes (McKeon et al., Phys. Fluids, 25, 2013). We use the hierarchies of self-similar modes in the logarithmic region to extend the notion of triad modes to triad hierarchies. It is shown that the interaction coefficients for the triad modes that belong to a triad hierarchy follow an exponential function. The combination of these findings can be used to better understand the dynamics and interaction of flow structures in the logarithmic region. The compatibility of the proposed model with theoretical and experimental results is further discussed.
  • This article accompanies a fluid dynamics video entered into the Gallery of Fluid Motion of the 66th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics.
  • The work of Couder \textit{et al} (see also Bush \textit{et al}) inspired consideration of the impact of a submerged obstacle, providing a local change of depth, on the behavior of oil drops in the bouncing regime. In the linked videos, we recreate some of their results for a drop bouncing on a uniform depth bath of the same liquid undergoing vertical oscillations just below the conditions for Faraday instability, and show a range of new behaviors associated with change of depth. This article accompanies a fluid dynamics video entered into the Gallery of Fluid Motion of the 66th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics.
  • We study the Reynolds number scaling and the geometric self-similarity of a gain-based, low-rank approximation to turbulent channel flows, determined by the resolvent formulation of McKeon & Sharma (2010), in order to obtain a description of the streamwise turbulence intensity from direct consideration of the Navier-Stokes equations. Under this formulation, the velocity field is decomposed into propagating waves (with single streamwise and spanwise wavelengths and wave speed) whose wall-normal shapes are determined from the principal singular function of the corresponding resolvent operator. Using the accepted scalings of the mean velocity in wall-bounded turbulent flows, we establish that the resolvent operator admits three classes of wave parameters that induce universal behavior with Reynolds number on the low-rank model, and which are consistent with scalings proposed throughout the wall turbulence literature. In addition, it was shown that a necessary condition for geometrically self-similar resolvent modes is the presence of a logarithmic turbulent mean velocity. We identify the scalings that constitute hierarchies of self-similar modes that are parameterized by the critical wall-normal location where the speed of the mode equals the local turbulent mean velocity. For the rank-1 model subject to broadband forcing, the integrated streamwise energy density takes a universal form which is consistent with the dominant near-wall turbulent motions. When the shape of the forcing is optimized to enforce matching with results from direct numerical simulations at low turbulent Reynolds numbers, further similarity appears. Representation of these weight functions using similarity laws enables prediction of the Reynolds number and wall-normal variations of the streamwise energy intensity at high Reynolds numbers (${Re}_\tau \approx 10^3 - 10^{10}$).
  • A streamwise-constant model is presented to investigate the basic mechanisms responsible for the change in mean flow occuring during pipe flow transition. Using a single forced momentum balance equation, we show that the shape of the velocity profile is robust to changes in the forcing profile and that both linear non-normal and nonlinear effects are required to capture the change in mean flow associated with transition to turbulence. The particularly simple form of the model allows for the study of the momentum transfer directly by inspection of the equations. The distribution of the high- and low-speed streaks over the cross-section of the pipe produced by our model is remarkably similar to one observed in the velocity field near the trailing edge of the puff structures present in pipe flow transition. Under stochastic forcing, the model exhibits a quasi-periodic self-sustaining cycle characterized by the creation and subsequent decay of "streamwise-constant puffs", so-called due to the good agreement between the temporal evolution of their velocity field and the projection of the velocity field associated with three-dimensional puffs in a frame of reference moving at the bulk velocity. We establish that the flow dynamics are relatively insensitive to the regeneration mechanisms invoked to produce near-wall streamwise vortices and that using small, unstructured background disturbances to regenerate the streamwise vortices is sufficient to capture the formation of the high- and low-speed streaks and their segregation leading to the blunting of the velocity profile characteristic of turbulent pipe flow.
  • We study the input-output response of a streamwise constant projection of the Navier-Stokes equations for plane Couette flow, the so-called 2D/3C model. Study of a streamwise constant model is motivated by numerical and experimental observations that suggest the prevalence and importance of streamwise and quasi-streamwise elongated structures. Periodic spanwise/wall-normal (z-y) plane stream functions are used as input to develop a forced 2D/3C streamwise velocity field that is qualitatively similar to a fully turbulent spatial field of DNS data. The input-output response associated with the 2D/3C nonlinear coupling is used to estimate the energy optimal spanwise wavelength over a range of Reynolds numbers. The results of the input-output analysis agree with previous studies of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. The optimal energy corresponds to minimal nonlinear coupling. On the other hand, the nature of the forced 2D/3C streamwise velocity field provides evidence that the nonlinear coupling in the 2D/3C model is responsible for creating the well known characteristic "S" shaped turbulent velocity profile. This indicates that there is an important tradeoff between energy amplification, which is primarily linear and the seemingly nonlinear momentum transfer mechanism that produces a turbulent-like mean profile.