• The so-called jellyfish galaxies are objects exhibiting disturbed morphology, mostly in the form of tails of gas stripped from the main body of the galaxy. Several works have strongly suggested ram pressure stripping to be the mechanism driving this phenomenon. Here, we focus on one of these objects, drawn from a sample of optically selected jellyfish galaxies, and use it to validate SINOPSIS, the spectral fitting code that will be used for the analysis of the GASP (GAs Stripping Phenomena in galaxies with MUSE) survey, and study the spatial distribution and physical properties of gas and stellar populations in this galaxy. We compare the model spectra to those obtained with GANDALF, a code with similar features widely used to interpret the kinematic of stars and gas in galaxies from IFU data. We find that SINOPSIS can reproduce the pixel-by-pixel spectra of this galaxy at least as good as GANDALF does, providing reliable estimates of the underlying stellar absorption to properly correct the nebular gas emission. Using these results, we find strong evidences of a double effect of ram pressure exerted by the intracluster medium onto the gas of the galaxy. A moderate burst of star formation, dating between 20 and 500 Myr ago and involving the outer parts of the galaxy more strongly than the inner regions, was likely induced by a first interaction of the galaxy with the intracluster medium. Stripping by ram pressure, plus probable gas depletion due to star formation, contributed to create a truncated ionized gas disk. The presence of an extended stellar tail on only one side of the disk, points instead to another kind of process, likely a gravitational interaction by a fly-by or a close encounter with another galaxy in the cluster.
  • A major question in galaxy formation is how the gas supply that fuels activity in galaxies is modulated by their environment. We use spectroscopy of a set of well characterized clusters and groups at $0.4<z<0.8$ from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS) and compare it to identically selected field galaxies. Our spectroscopy allows us to isolate galaxies that are dominated by old stellar populations. Here we study a stellar-mass limited sample ($\log(M_*/M_\odot)>10.4$) of these old galaxies with weak [OII] emission. We use line ratios and compare to studies of local early type galaxies to conclude that this gas is likely excited by post-AGB stars and hence represents a diffuse gas component in the galaxies. For cluster and group galaxies the fraction with EW([OII])$>5$\AA\ is $f_{[OII]}=0.08^{+0.03}_{-0.02}$ and $f_{[OII]}=0.06^{+0.07}_{-0.04}$ respectively. For field galaxies we find $f_{[OII]}=0.27^{+0.07}_{-0.06}$, representing a 2.8$\sigma$ difference between the [OII] fractions for old galaxies between the different environments. We conclude that a population of old galaxies in all environments has ionized gas that likely stems from stellar mass loss. In the field galaxies also experience gas accretion from the cosmic web and in groups and clusters these galaxies have had their gas accretion shut off by their environment. Additionally, galaxies with emission preferentially avoid the virialized region of the cluster in position-velocity space. We discuss the implications of our results, among which is that gas accretion shutoff is likely effective at group halo masses (log~${\cal M}/$\msol$>12.8$) and that there are likely multiple gas removal processes happening in dense environments.
  • [Abridged] We use the WINGS database to select a sample of 67 nearby galaxy clusters with at least 30 spectroscopic members each. 53 of these clusters do not show evidence of substructures in phase-space, while 14 do. We estimate the virial radii and circular velocities of the 67 clusters by a variety of proxies (velocity dispersion, X-ray temperature, and richness) and use these estimates to build stack samples from these 53 and 14 clusters ('Reg' and 'Irr' stacks, respectively). We determine the number-density and velocity-dispersion profiles (VDPs) of E, S0, and Sp+Irr (S) galaxies in the Reg and Irr samples, separately, and fit models to these profiles. The number density profiles of E, S0, and S galaxies are adequately described by either a NFW or a cored King model, both for the Reg and Irr samples, with a slight preference for the NFW model. The spatial distribution concentration increases from the S to the S0 and to the E populations, both in the Reg and the Irr stacks, reflecting the well-known morphology-radius relation. Reg clusters have a more concentrated spatial distribution of E and S0 galaxies than Irr clusters, while the spatial distributions of S galaxies in Reg and Irr clusters are similar. We propose a new phenomenological model that provides acceptable fits to the VDP of all our galaxy samples. The VDPs become steeper and with a higher normalization from E to S0 to S galaxies. The S0 VDP is close to that of E galaxies in Reg clusters, and intermediate between those of E and S galaxies in Irr clusters. Our results suggest that S galaxies are a recently accreted cluster population, that take less than 3 Gyr to evolve into S0 galaxies after accretion, and in doing so modify their phase-space distribution, approaching that of cluster ellipticals. While in Reg clusters this evolutionary process is mostly completed, it is still ongoing in Irr clusters.
  • Alan McConnachie, Carine Babusiaux, Michael Balogh, Simon Driver, Pat Côté, Helene Courtois, Luke Davies, Laura Ferrarese, Sarah Gallagher, Rodrigo Ibata, Nicolas Martin, Aaron Robotham, Kim Venn, Eva Villaver, Jo Bovy, Alessandro Boselli, Matthew Colless, Johan Comparat, Kelly Denny, Pierre-Alain Duc, Sara Ellison, Richard de Grijs, Mirian Fernandez-Lorenzo, Ken Freeman, Raja Guhathakurta, Patrick Hall, Andrew Hopkins, Mike Hudson, Andrew Johnson, Nick Kaiser, Jun Koda, Iraklis Konstantopoulos, George Koshy, Khee-Gan Lee, Adi Nusser, Anna Pancoast, Eric Peng, Celine Peroux, Patrick Petitjean, Christophe Pichon, Bianca Poggianti, Carlo Schmid, Prajval Shastri, Yue Shen, Chris Willot, Scott Croom, Rosine Lallement, Carlo Schimd, Dan Smith, Matthew Walker, Jon Willis, Alessandro Bosselli Matthew Colless, Aruna Goswami, Matt Jarvis, Eric Jullo, Jean-Paul Kneib, Iraklis Konstantopoloulous, Jeff Newman, Johan Richard, Firoza Sutaria, Edwar Taylor, Ludovic van Waerbeke, Giuseppina Battaglia, Pat Hall, Misha Haywood, Charli Sakari, Carlo Schmid, Arnaud Seibert, Sivarani Thirupathi, Yuting Wang, Yiping Wang, Ferdinand Babas, Steve Bauman, Elisabetta Caffau, Mary Beth Laychak, David Crampton, Daniel Devost, Nicolas Flagey, Zhanwen Han, Clare Higgs, Vanessa Hill, Kevin Ho, Sidik Isani, Shan Mignot, Rick Murowinski, Gajendra Pandey, Derrick Salmon, Arnaud Siebert, Doug Simons, Else Starkenburg, Kei Szeto, Brent Tully, Tom Vermeulen, Kanoa Withington, Nobuo Arimoto, Martin Asplund, Herve Aussel, Michele Bannister, Harish Bhatt, SS Bhargavi, John Blakeslee, Joss Bland-Hawthorn, James Bullock, Denis Burgarella, Tzu-Ching Chang, Andrew Cole, Jeff Cooke, Andrew Cooper, Paola Di Matteo, Ginevra Favole, Hector Flores, Bryan Gaensler, Peter Garnavich, Karoline Gilbert, Rosa Gonzalez-Delgado, Puragra Guhathakurta, Guenther Hasinger, Falk Herwig, Narae Hwang, Pascale Jablonka, Matthew Jarvis, Umanath Kamath, Lisa Kewley, Damien Le Borgne, Geraint Lewis, Robert Lupton, Sarah Martell, Mario Mateo, Olga Mena, David Nataf, Jeffrey Newman, Enrique Pérez, Francisco Prada, Mathieu Puech, Alejandra Recio-Blanco, Annie Robin, Will Saunders, Daniel Smith, C.S. Stalin, Charling Tao, Karun Thanjuvur, Laurence Tresse, Ludo van Waerbeke, Jian-Min Wang, David Yong, Gongbo Zhao, Patrick Boisse, James Bolton, Piercarlo Bonifacio, Francois Bouchy, Len Cowie, Katia Cunha, Magali Deleuil, Ernst de Mooij, Patrick Dufour, Sebastien Foucaud, Karl Glazebrook, John Hutchings, Chiaki Kobayashi, Rolf-Peter Kudritzki, Yang-Shyang Li, Lihwai Lin, Yen-Ting Lin, Martin Makler, Norio Narita, Changbom Park, Ryan Ransom, Swara Ravindranath, Bacham Eswar Reddy, Marcin Sawicki, Luc Simard, Raghunathan Srianand, Thaisa Storchi-Bergmann, Keiichi Umetsu, Ting-Gui Wang, Jong-Hak Woo, Xue-Bing Wu
    May 31, 2016 astro-ph.GA, astro-ph.IM
    MSE is an 11.25m aperture observatory with a 1.5 square degree field of view that will be fully dedicated to multi-object spectroscopy. More than 3200 fibres will feed spectrographs operating at low (R ~ 2000 - 3500) and moderate (R ~ 6000) spectral resolution, and approximately 1000 fibers will feed spectrographs operating at high (R ~ 40000) resolution. MSE is designed to enable transformational science in areas as diverse as tomographic mapping of the interstellar and intergalactic media; the in-situ chemical tagging of thick disk and halo stars; connecting galaxies to their large scale structure; measuring the mass functions of cold dark matter sub-halos in galaxy and cluster-scale hosts; reverberation mapping of supermassive black holes in quasars; next generation cosmological surveys using redshift space distortions and peculiar velocities. MSE is an essential follow-up facility to current and next generations of multi-wavelength imaging surveys, including LSST, Gaia, Euclid, WFIRST, PLATO, and the SKA, and is designed to complement and go beyond the science goals of other planned and current spectroscopic capabilities like VISTA/4MOST, WHT/WEAVE, AAT/HERMES and Subaru/PFS. It is an ideal feeder facility for E-ELT, TMT and GMT, and provides the missing link between wide field imaging and small field precision astronomy. MSE is optimized for high throughput, high signal-to-noise observations of the faintest sources in the Universe with high quality calibration and stability being ensured through the dedicated operational mode of the observatory. (abridged)
  • The cores of clusters at 0 $\lesssim$ z $\lesssim$ 1 are dominated by quiescent early-type galaxies, whereas the field is dominated by star-forming late-type ones. Galaxy properties, notably the star formation (SF) ability, are altered as they fall into overdense regions. The critical issues to understand this evolution are how the truncation of SF is connected to the morphological transformation and the responsible physical mechanism. The GaLAxy Cluster Evolution Survey (GLACE) is conducting a study on the variation of galaxy properties (SF, AGN, morphology) as a function of environment in a representative sample of clusters. A deep survey of emission line galaxies (ELG) is being performed, mapping a set of optical lines ([OII], [OIII], H$\beta$ and H$\alpha$/[NII]) in several clusters at z $\sim$ 0.40, 0.63 and 0.86. Using the Tunable Filters (TF) of OSIRIS/GTC, GLACE applies the technique of TF tomography: for each line, a set of images at different wavelengths are taken through the TF, to cover a rest frame velocity range of several thousands km/s. The first GLACE results target the H$\alpha$/[NII] lines in the cluster ZwCl 0024.0+1652 at z = 0.395 covering $\sim$ 2 $\times$ r$_{vir}$. We discuss the techniques devised to process the TF tomography observations to generate the catalogue of H$\alpha$ emitters of 174 unique cluster sources down to a SFR below 1 M$_{\odot}$/yr. The AGN population is discriminated using different diagnostics and found to be $\sim$ 37% of the ELG population. The median SFR is 1.4 M$_{\odot}$/yr. We have studied the spatial distribution of ELG, confirming the existence of two components in the redshift space. Finally, we have exploited the outstanding spectral resolution of the TF to estimate the cluster mass from ELG dynamics, finding M$_{200}$ = 4.1 $\times$ 10$^{14}$ M$_{\odot} h^{-1}$, in agreement with previous weak-lensing estimates.
  • Aims. We present the B-, V- and K-band surface photometry catalogs obtained running the automatic software GASPHOT on galaxies from the WINGS cluster survey having isophotal area larger than 200 pixels. The catalogs can be downloaded at the Centre de Donnees Astronomiques de Strasbourg (CDS). Methods. We outline the GASPHOT performances and compare our surface photometry with that obtained by SExtractor, GALFIT and GIM2D. This analysis is aimed at providing statistical information about the accuracy generally achieved by the softwares for automatic surface photometry of galaxies. Results. For each galaxy and for each photometric band the GASPHOT catalogs provide the parameters of the Sersic law best-fitting the luminosity profiles. They are: the sky coordinates of the galaxy center (R:A:; DEC:), the total magnitude (m), the semi-major axis of the effective isophote (Re), the Sersic index (n), the axis ratio (b=a) and a flag parameter (QFLAG) giving a global indication of the fit quality. The WINGS-GASPHOT database includes 41,463 galaxies in the B-band, 42,275 in the V-band, and 71,687 in the K-band. We find that the bright early-type galaxies have larger Sersic indices and effective radii, as well as redder colors in their center. In general the effective radii increase systematically from the K- to the V- and B-band. Conclusions. The GASPHOT photometry turns out to be in fairly good agreement with the surface photometry obtained by GALFIT and GIM2D, as well as with the aperture photometry provided by SExtractor. The main advantages of GASPHOT with respect to other tools are: (i) the automatic finding of the local PSF; (ii) the short CPU time of execution; (iii) the remarkable stability against the choice of the initial guess parameters. All these characteristics make GASPHOT an ideal tool for blind surface photometry of large galaxy samples in wide-field CCD mosaics.
  • Using data from the SDSS-DR7, including structural measurements from 2D surface brightness fits with GIM2D, we show how the fraction of quiescent galaxies depends on galaxy stellar mass $M_*$, effective radius $R_e$, fraction of $r-$band light in the bulge, $B/T$, and their status as a central or satellite galaxy at $0.01<z<0.2$. For central galaxies we confirm that the quiescent fraction depends not only on stellar mass, but also on $R_e$. The dependence is particularly strong as a function of $M_*/R_e^\alpha$, with $\alpha\sim 1.5$. This appears to be driven by a simple dependence on $B/T$ over the mass range $9 < \log(M_*/M_\odot) < 11.5$, and is qualitatively similar even if galaxies with $B/T>0.3$ are excluded. For satellite galaxies, the quiescent fraction is always larger than that of central galaxies, for any combination of $M_*$, $R_e$ and $B/T$. The quenching efficiency is not constant, but reaches a maximum of $\sim 0.7$ for galaxies with $9 < \log(M_*/M_\odot) < 9.5$ and $R_e<1$ kpc. This is the same region of parameter space in which the satellite fraction itself reaches its maximum value, suggesting that the transformation from an active central galaxy to a quiescent satellite is associated with a reduction in $R_e$ due to an increase in dominance of a bulge component.
  • The IMACS Cluster Building Survey (ICBS) provides spectra of ~2200 galaxies 0.31<z<0.54 in 5 rich clusters (R <= 5 Mpc) and the field. Infalling, dynamically cold groups with tens of members account for approximately half of the supercluster population, contributing to a growth in cluster mass of ~100% by today. The ICBS spectra distinguish non-starforming (PAS) and poststarburst (PSB) from starforming galaxies -- continuously starforming (CSF) or starbursts, (SBH or SBO), identified by anomalously strong H-delta absorption or [O II] emission. For the infalling cluster groups and similar field groups, we find a correlation between PAS+PSB fraction and group mass, indicating substantial "preprocessing" through quenching mechanisms that can turn starforming galaxies into passive galaxies without the unique environment of rich clusters. SBH + SBO starburst galaxies are common, and they maintain an approximately constant ratio (SBH+SBO)/CSF ~ 25% in all environments -- from field, to groups, to rich clusters. Similarly, while PSB galaxies strongly favor denser environments, PSB/PAS ~ 10-20% for all environments. This result, and their timescale tau < 500 Myr, indicates that starbursts are not signatures of a quenching mechanism that produces the majority of passive galaxies. We suggest instead that starbursts and poststarbursts signal minor mergers and accretions, in starforming and passive galaxies, respectively, and that the principal mechanisms for producing passive systems are (1) early major mergers, for elliptical galaxies, and (2) later, less violent processes -- such as starvation and tidal stripping, for S0 galaxies.
  • We present here a simple model for the star formation history of galaxies that is successful in describing both the star formation rate density over cosmic time, as well as the distribution of specific star formation rates of galaxies at the current epoch, and the evolution of this quantity in galaxy populations to a redshift of z=1. We show first that the cosmic star formation rate density is remarkably well described by a simple log-normal in time. We next postulate that this functional form for the ensemble is also a reasonable description for the star formation histories of individual galaxies. Using the measured specific star formation rates for galaxies at z~0 from Paper III in this series, we then construct a realisation of a universe populated by such galaxies in which the parameters of the log-normal star formation history of each galaxy are adjusted to match the specific star formation rates at z~0 as well as fitting, in ensemble, the cosmic star formation rate density from z=0 to z=8. This model predicts, with striking fidelity, the distribution of specific star formation rates in mass-limited galaxy samples to z=1; this match is not achieved by other models with a different functional form for the star formation histories of individual galaxies, but with the same number of degrees of freedom, suggesting that the log-normal form is well matched to the likely actual histories of individual galaxies. We also impose the specific star formation rate versus mass distributions at higher redshifts from Paper III as constraints on the model, and show that, as previously suggested, some galaxies in the field, particularly low mass galaxies, are quite young at intermediate redshifts. As emphasized in Paper III, starbursts are insufficient ...[abridged]
  • We search for massive and compact galaxies (superdense galaxies, hereafter SDGs) at z=0.03-0.11 in the Padova-Millennium Galaxy and Group Catalogue, a spectroscopically complete sample representative of the local Universe general field population. We find that compact galaxies with radii and mass densities comparable to high-z massive and passive galaxies represent 4.4% of all galaxies with stellar masses above 3 X 10^10 M_sun, yielding a number density of 4.3 X 10^-4 h^3 Mpc^-3. Most of them are S0s (70%) or ellipticals (23%), are red and have intermediate-to-old stellar populations, with a median luminosity-weighted age of 5.4 Gyr and a median mass-weighted age of 9.2 Gyr. Their velocity dispersions and dynamical masses are consistent with the small radii and high stellar mass estimates. Comparing with the WINGS sample of cluster galaxies at similar redshifts, the fraction of superdense galaxies is three times smaller in the field than in clusters, and cluster SDGs are on average 4 Gyr older than field SDGs. We confirm the existence of a universal trend of smaller radii for older luminosity-weighted ages at fixed galaxy mass. On top of the well known dependence of stellar age on galaxy mass, the luminosity-weighted age of galaxies depends on galaxy compactness at fixed mass, and, for a fixed mass and radius, on environment. This effect needs to be taken into account in order not to overestimate the evolution of galaxy sizes from high- to low-z. Our results and hierarchical simulations suggest that a significant fraction of the massive compact galaxies at high-z have evolved into compact galaxies in galaxy clusters today. When stellar age and environmental effects are taken into account, the average amount of size evolution of individual galaxies between high- and low-z is mild, a factor ~1.6. (abridged)
  • With the aim of distinguishing between possible physical mechanisms acting on galaxies when they fall into clusters, we study the properties of the gas and the stars in a sample of 422 emission-line galaxies from EDisCS in different environments up to z~1. We identify galaxies with kinematical disturbances (from emission-lines in their 2D spectra) and find that they are more frequent in clusters than in the field. The fraction of kinematically-disturbed galaxies increases with cluster velocity dispersion and decreases with distance from the cluster centre, but remains constant with projected galaxy density. We also studied morphological disturbances in the stellar light from HST/F814W images, finding that the fraction of morphologically disturbed galaxies is similar in all environments. Moreover, there is little correlation between the presence of kinematically-disturbed gas and morphological distortions. We also study the dependence of the Tully-Fisher relation, star formation, and extent of the emission on environment, and conclude that the gas disks in cluster galaxies have been truncated, and therefore their star formation is more concentrated than in low-density environments. If spirals transform into S0s, our findings imply that the physical mechanism transforming cluster galaxies efficiently disturbs the star-forming gas and reduces their specific star formation rate. Moreover, this star-forming gas is either removed more efficiently from the outskirts of the galaxies or is driven towards the centre (or both), helping to build the bulges of S0s. These results, in addition to the finding that the transformation mechanism does not seem to induce strong morphological disturbances on the galaxies, suggest that the physical processes involved are related to the intracluster medium, with galaxy-galaxy interactions playing only a limited role in clusters.
  • We use publicly available galaxy merger trees, obtained applying semi-analytic techniques to a large high resolution cosmological simulation, to study the environmental history of group and cluster galaxies. Our results highlight the existence of an intrinsic history bias which makes the nature versus nurture (as well as the mass versus environment) debate inherently ill posed. In particular we show that: (i) surviving massive satellites were accreted later than their less massive counterparts, from more massive haloes; (ii) the mixing of galaxy populations is incomplete during halo assembly, which creates a correlation between the time a galaxy becomes satellite and its present distance from the parent halo centre. The weakest trends are found for the most massive satellites, as a result of efficient dynamical friction and late formation times of massive haloes. A large fraction of the most massive group/cluster members are accreted onto the main progenitor of the final halo as central galaxies, while about half of the galaxies with low and intermediate stellar mass are accreted as satellites. Large fractions of group and cluster galaxies (in particular those of low stellar mass) have therefore been `pre-processed' as satellites of groups with mass ~10^13 Msun. To quantify the relevance of hierarchical structure growth on the observed environmental trends, we have considered observational estimates of the passive galaxy fractions, and their variation as a function of halo mass and cluster-centric distance. Comparisons with our theoretical predictions require relatively long times (~5-7 Gyr) for the suppression of star formation in group and cluster satellites. [abridged]
  • We present Spitzer MIPS 24-micron observations of 16 0.4<z<0.8 galaxy clusters drawn from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS). This is the first large 24-micron survey of clusters at intermediate redshift. The depth of our imaging corresponds to a total IR luminosity of 8x10^10 Lsun, just below the luminosity of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs), and 6^{+1}_{-1}% of M_V < -19 cluster members show 24-micron emission at or above this level. We compare with a large sample of coeval field galaxies and find that while the fraction of cluster LIRGs lies significantly below that of the field, the IR luminosities of the field and cluster galaxies are consistent. However, the stellar masses of the EDisCS LIRGs are systematically higher than those of the field LIRGs. A comparison with optical data reveals that ~80% of cluster LIRGs are blue and the remaining 20% lie on the red sequence. Of LIRGs with optical spectra, 88^{+4}_{-5}% show [O II] emission with EW([O II])>5A, and ~75% exhibit optical signatures of dusty starbursts. On average, the fraction of cluster LIRGs increases with projected cluster-centric radius but remains systematically lower than the field fraction over the area probed (< 1.5xR200). The amount of obscured star formation declines significantly over the 2.4 Gyr interval spanned by the EDisCS sample, and the rate of decline is the same for the cluster and field populations. Our results are consistent with an exponentially declining LIRG fraction, with the decline in the field delayed by ~1 Gyr relative to the clusters.
  • In this contribution, we present some preliminary observational results from the completed ultra-deep survey of 21cm emission from neutral hydrogen at redshifts z=0.164-0.224 with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. In two separate fields, a total of 160 individual galaxies has been detected in neutral hydrogen, with HI masses varying from 1.1x10^9 to 4.0x10^10 Msun. The largest galaxies are spatially resolved by the synthesized beam of 23x37 arcsec^2 while the velocity resolution of 19 km/s allowed the HI emission lines to be well resolved. The large scale structure in the surveyed volume is traced well in HI, apart from the highest density regions like the cores of galaxy clusters. All significant HI detections have obvious or plausible optical counterparts which are usually blue late-type galaxies that are UV-bright. One of the observed fields contains a massive Butcher-Oemler cluster but none of the associated blue galaxies has been detected in HI. The data suggest that the lower-luminosity galaxies at z=0.2 are more gas-rich than galaxies of similar luminosities at z=0, pending a careful analysis of the completeness near the detection limit. Optical counterparts of the HI detected galaxies are mostly located in the 'blue cloud' of the galaxy population although several galaxies on the 'red sequence' are also detected in HI. These results hold great promise for future deep 21cm surveys of neutral hydrogen with MeerKAT, APERTIF, ASKAP, and ultimately the Square Kilometre Array.
  • We present the rest-frame optical luminosity function (LF) of red sequence galaxies in 16 clusters at 0.4<z<0.8 drawn from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS). We compare our clusters to an analogous sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and match the EDisCS clusters to their most likely descendants. We measure all LFs down to M M* + (2.5 - 3.5). At z<0.8, the bright end of the LF is consistent with passive evolution but there is a significant build-up of the faint end of the red sequence towards lower redshift. There is a weak dependence of the LF on cluster velocity dispersion for EDisCS but no such dependence for the SDSS clusters. We find tentative evidence that red sequence galaxies brighter than a threshold magnitude are already in place, and that this threshold evolves to fainter magnitudes toward lower redshifts. We compare the EDisCS LFs with the LF of co-eval red sequence galaxies in the field and find that the bright end of the LFs agree. However, relative to the number of bright red galaxies, the field has more faint red galaxies than clusters at 0.6<z<0.8 but fewer at 0.4<z<0.6, implying differential evolution. We compare the total light in the EDisCS cluster red sequences to the total red sequence light in our SDSS cluster sample. Clusters at 0.4<z<0.8 must increase their luminosity on the red sequence (and therefore stellar mass in red galaxies) by a factor of 1-3 by z=0. The necessary processes that add mass to the red sequence in clusters predict local clusters that are over-luminous as compared to those observed in the SDSS. The predicted cluster luminosities can be reconciled with observed local cluster luminosities by combining multiple previously known effects.
  • A pilot study with the powerful new backend of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) of two galaxy clusters at z=0.2 has revealed neutral hydrogen emission from 39 galaxies. The volume probed for each cluster is 1.7x10^4 Mpc^3, with spatial and velocity resolutions of 54x86 kpc^2 and 19.7 km/s, covering both clusters and the large scale structure in which they are embedded. The spatial distribution of the HI detected galaxies is very different for the two clusters. In Abell 963, most of the gas-rich galaxies are located to the northeast, at 1-3 Mpc from the cluster center in projection. Their velocities are slightly redshifted with respect to the cluster mean. This could be a gas-rich group falling in from the front. Abell 2192 is less massive and more diffuse, with the gas rich galaxies more uniformly spread over a large region around the cluster. The HI masses of the detected galaxies range from 5x10^9 to 4x10^10 Msun. Some HI-rich galaxies are spatially resolved and rudimentary rotation curves are derived, showing the prospect for Tully-Fisher studies of different galaxy populations in these environments. Only one galaxy is detected within a 1 Mpc radius from the center of the Butcher-Oemler cluster Abell 963, and none of the blue B-O galaxies which are all located within the central Mpc. The HI detected galaxies outside the central Mpc are of similar colour and magnitude as the non-detected B-O galaxies, indicating that the blue B-O galaxies are gas-poor compared to their counterparts in the field.
  • We present Halpha-derived star-formation rates (SFRs) for three z ~ 0.75 galaxy clusters. Our 1 sigma flux limit corresponds to a star-formation rate of 0.10-0.24 solar mass per year, and our minimum reliable Halpha + [N II] rest-frame equivalent width is 10\AA. We show that Halpha narrowband imaging is an efficient method for measuring star formation in distant clusters. In two out of three clusters, we find that the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases with projected distance from the cluster center. We also find that the fraction of star-forming galaxies decreases with increasing local galaxy surface density in the same two clusters. We compare the median rate of star formation among star-forming cluster galaxies to a small sample of star-forming field galaxies from the literature and find that the median cluster SFRs are \~50% less than the median field SFR. We characterize cluster evolution in terms of the mass-normalized integrated cluster SFR and find that the z ~ 0.75 clusters have more SFR per cluster mass on average than the z <= 0.4 clusters from the literature. The interpretation of this result is complicated by the dependence of the mass-normalized SFR on cluster mass and the lack of sufficient overlap in the mass ranges covered by the low and high redshift samples. We find that the fraction and luminosities of the brightest starburst galaxies at z ~ 0.75 are consistent with their being progenitors of the post-starburst galaxies at z ~ 0.45 if the post-starburst phase lasts several (~5) times longer than the starburst phase.
  • Analysing mid--infrared ISOCAM images of the cluster of galaxies J1888.16CL, we identified among its members several particularly active galaxies with total infrared luminosities well above 10^{11} Lsun. If powered by dust enshrouded starbursts, as suggested by their optical spectra, these Luminous Infrared Galaxies would exhibit star formation rates surprisingly high in the cluster environment. The triggering mechanism is unclear but could be tidal collisions within sub-structures or infalling groups.
  • A large spectroscopic survey is constructed of galaxies in the Coma cluster. The survey covers a wide area (1 deg$^2$) to deep magnitudes (R ~ 19.5), covering both the core (high density) and outskirts (intermediate to low density) of the cluster. The spectroscopic sample consists of a total of 1191 galaxies, of which, 760 galaxies are confirmed members of the Coma cluster. A statistical technique is developed to correct the spectroscopic sample for incompletness. The corrected sample is then used to construct R-band luminosity function (LF) spanning a range of 7 magnitudes (-23 < M_R < -16) both at the core and outskirts of the cluster. Dependence of the LF on local environment in Coma is explored. The LFs are found to be the same, within the errors, between the inner and outer regions and close to those from recent measurements for field galaxies. The total B-band LF for the Coma cluster, fitted to a Schecter form is also measured and shows a dip at M(B) = -18 mag., in agreement with previous studies. The implications of this feature are discussed. The LF is studied in B-R color intervals and shows a steep faint-end slope for red (B-R > 1.35) galaxies, both at the core and outskirts of the cluster. This population of low luminosity red galaxies has a higher surface density than the blue (B-R < 1.35) star-forming population, dominating the faint-end of the Coma cluster LF. It is found that relative number of high surface brightness galaxies is larger at the cluster core, implying destruction of low surface brightness galaxies in dense core environment.
  • We present spectroscopic observations of galaxies in the fields of 10 distant clusters for which we have previously presented deep imaging with WFPC2 on board the HST. The clusters span the redshift range z=0.37-0.56 and are the subject of a detailed ground- and space-based study to investigate the evolution of galaxies as a function of environment and epoch. The data presented here include positions, photometry, redshifts, spectral line strengths and classifications for 657 galaxies in the fields of the 10 clusters. The catalog comprises 424 cluster members across the 10 clusters and 233 field galaxies, with detailed morphological information from our WFPC2 images for 204 of the cluster galaxies and 71 in the field. We illustrate some basic properties of the catalog, including correlations between the morphological and spectral properties of our large sample of cluster galaxies. A direct comparison of the spectral properties of the high redshift cluster and field populations suggest that the phenomenon of strong Balmer lines in otherwise passive galaxies (commonly called E+A, but renamed here as the k+a class) shows an order-of-magnitude increase in the rich cluster environment, compared to a more modest increase in the field population. This suggests that the process or processes involved in producing k+a galaxies are either substantially more effective in the cluster environment or that this environment prolongs the visibility of this phase. A more detailed analysis and modeling of these data will be presented in Poggianti et al. (1998).
  • We present a detailed analysis of the spectroscopic catalog of galaxies in 10 distant clusters from Dressler et al. (1999, D99). We investigate the nature of the different spectral classes defined by D99 including star forming, post-starburst and passive galaxy populations, and reproduce their basic properties using our spectral synthesis model. We attempt to identify the evolutionary pathways between the various spectral classes in order to search for the progenitors of the numerous post-starburst galaxies. The comparison of the spectra of the distant galaxy populations with samples drawn from the local Universe leads us to identify a significant population of dust-enshrouded starburst galaxies, showing both strong Balmer absorption and relatively modest [OII] emission, that we believe are the most likely progenitors of the post-starburst population. We present the differences between the field and cluster galaxies at z=0.4-0.5. We then compare the spectral and the morphological properties of the distant cluster galaxies, exploring the connection between the quenching of star formation inferred from the spectra and the strong evolution of the S0 population discussed by Dressler et al. (1997). We conclude that either two different timescales and/or two different physical processes are responsible for the spectral and the morphological transformation.