• Despite the importance of high thermal conductance (i.e. low thermal resistance) of metal contacts to thermal management of graphene devices, prior reported thermal conductance of metal/graphene interfaces are all relatively low, only 20-40 MW m$^{-2}$ K$^{-1}$. One possible route to improve the thermal conductance ($G$) of metal/graphene interfaces is through additional heat conduction by electrons, since graphene can be easily doped by metals. In this paper, we evaluate the electronic heat conduction across metal/graphene interfaces by measuring the thermal conductance of Pd/transferred graphene (trG)/Pd interfaces, prepared by either thermal evaporation or radio-frequency (rf) magnetron sputtering, over a wide temperature range of 80 to 500 K. We find that for the samples prepared by thermal evaporation, the thermal conductance of Pd/trG/Pd is 42 MW m$^{-2}$ K$^{-1}$. The thermal conductance only weakly depends on temperature, which suggests that heat is predominantly carried by phonons across the intrinsic Pd/graphene interface. However, for Pd/trG/Pd samples with the top Pd films deposited by rf magnetron sputtering, we observe a significant increment of thermal conductance from the intrinsic value of 42 MW m$^{-2}$ K$^{-1}$ to 300 MW m$^{-2}$ K$^{-1}$, and $G$ is roughly proportional to $T$. We attribute the enhancement of thermal conductance to an additional channel of heat transport by electrons via atomic-scale pinholes formed in the graphene during the sputtering process. We thus conclude that electrons play a negligible role in heat conduction across intrinsic interfaces of metal and pristine graphene, and the contribution of electrons is only substantial if graphene is damaged.
  • Background: The Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) endows epithelial-looking cells with enhanced migratory ability during embryonic development and tissue repair. EMT can also be co-opted by cancer cells to acquire metastatic potential and drug-resistance. Recent research has argued that epithelial (E) cells can undergo either a partial EMT to attain a hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal (E/M) phenotype that typically displays collective migration, or a complete EMT to adopt a mesenchymal (M) phenotype that shows individual migration. The core EMT regulatory network - miR-34/SNAIL/miR-200/ZEB1 - has been identified by various studies, but how this network regulates the transitions among the E, E/M, and M phenotypes remains controversial. Two major mathematical models - ternary chimera switch (TCS) and cascading bistable switches (CBS) - that both focus on the miR-34/SNAIL/miR-200/ZEB1 network, have been proposed to elucidate the EMT dynamics, but a detailed analysis of how well either or both of these two models can capture recent experimental observations about EMT dynamics remains to be done. Results: Here, via an integrated experimental and theoretical approach, we first show that both these two models can be used to understand the two-step transition of EMT - E-E/M-M, the different responses of SNAIL and ZEB1 to exogenous TGF-b and the irreversibility of complete EMT. Next, we present new experimental results that tend to discriminate between these two models. We show that ZEB1 is present at intermediate levels in the hybrid E/M H1975 cells, and that in HMLE cells, overexpression of SNAIL is not sufficient to initiate EMT in the absence of ZEB1 and FOXC2. Conclusions: These experimental results argue in favor of the TCS model proposing that miR-200/ZEB1 behaves as a three-way decision-making switch enabling transitions among the E, hybrid E/M and M phenotypes.
  • Heat transfer across interfaces of graphene and polar dielectrics (e.g. SiO2) could be mediated by direct phonon coupling, as well as electronic coupling with remote interfacial phonons (RIPs). To understand the relative contribution of each component, we develop a new pump-probe technique, called voltage-modulated thermoreflectance (VMTR), to accurately measure the change of interfacial thermal conductance under an electrostatic field. We employed VMTR on top gates of graphene field-effect transistors and find that the thermal conductance of SiO2/graphene/SiO2 interfaces increases by up to {\Delta}G=0.8 MW m-2 K-1 under electrostatic fields of <0.2 V nm-1 . We propose two possible explanations for the observed {\Delta}G. First, since the applied electrostatic field induces charge carriers in graphene, our VMTR measurements could originate from heat transfer between the charge carriers in graphene and RIPs in SiO2. Second, the increase in heat conduction could be caused by better conformity of graphene interfaces un-der electrostatic pressure exerted by the induced charge carriers. Regardless of the origins of the observed {\Delta}G, our VMTR measurements establish an upper limit for heat transfer from unbiased graphene to SiO2 substrates via RIP scattering; i.e., only <2 % of the interfacial heat transport is facilitated by RIP scattering even at a carrier concentration of 4x10^12 cm-2.
  • Accurate measurements of the cross-plane thermal conductivity {\Lambda}_cross of a high-thermal-conductivity thin film on a low-thermal-conductivity ({\Lambda}_s) substrate (e.g., {\Lambda}_cross/{\Lambda}_s>20) are challenging, due to the low thermal resistance of the thin film compared to that of the substrate. In principle, {\Lambda}_cross could be measured by time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR), using a high modulation frequency f_h and a large laser spot size. However, with one TDTR measurement at f_h, the uncertainty of the TDTR measurement is usually high due to low sensitivity of TDTR signals to {\Lambda}_cross and high sensitivity to the thickness h_Al of Al transducer deposited on the sample for TDTR measurements. We observe that in most TDTR measurements, the sensitivity to h_Al only depends weakly on the modulation frequency f. Thus, we performed an additional TDTR measurement at a low modulation frequency f_0, such that the sensitivity to h_Al is comparable but the sensitivity to {\Lambda}cross is near zero. We then analyze the ratio of the TDTR signals at f_h to that at f_0, and thus significantly improve the accuracy of our {\Lambda}cross measurements. As a demonstration of the dual-frequency approach, we measured the cross-plane thermal conductivity of a 400-nm-thick nickel-iron alloy film and a 3-{\mu}m-thick Cu film, both with an accuracy of ~10%. The dual-frequency TDTR approach is useful for future studies of thin films.
  • Delayed processes are ubiquitous in biological systems and are often characterized by delay differential equations (DDEs) and their extension to include stochastic effects. DDEs do not explicitly incorporate intermediate states associated with a delayed process but instead use an estimated average delay time. In an effort to examine the validity of this approach, we study systems with significant delays by explicitly incorporating intermediate steps. We show by that such explicit models often yield significantly different equilibrium distributions and transition times as compared to DDEs with deterministic delay values. Additionally, different explicit models with qualitatively different dynamics can give rise to the same DDEs revealing important ambiguities. We also show that DDE-based predictions of oscillatory behavior may fail for the corresponding explicit model.
  • Thermal conductance of metal contacts on transferred graphene (trG) could be significantly reduced from the intrinsic value of similar contacts on as-grown graphene (grG), due to additional resistance by increased roughness, residues, oxides and voids. In this paper, we compare the thermal conductance (G) of Al/trG/Cu interfaces with that of Al/grG/Cu interfaces to understand heat transfer across metal contacts on transferred graphene. Our samples are polycrystalline graphene grown on Cu foils by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and CVD-grown graphene transferred to evaporated Cu thin films. We find that for the Al/grG/Cu interfaces of as-grown CVD graphene, G=31 MW m^{-2} K^{-1} at room temperature, two orders of magnitude lower than that of Al/Cu interfaces. For most as-transferred graphene on Cu films, G=20 MW m^{-2} K^{-1}, 35% lower than that of as-grown CVD graphene. We carefully rule out the contributions of residues, native oxides and interfaces roughness, and attribute the difference in the thermal conductance of as-grown and as-transferred CVD graphene to different degrees of conformity of graphene to the Cu substrates. We find that a contact area of 50% only reduces the thermal conductance by 35%, suggesting that a small amount of heat transfer occurs across voids at graphene interfaces. We successfully improve the conformity of the as-transferred graphene to the substrates by annealing the samples at 300{\deg}C, and thus enhance the thermal conductance of the transferred graphene to the intrinsic value. From the temperature dependence measurements of G of Al/trG/Cu and Al/grG/Cu interfaces, we also confirm that phonons are the dominant heat carries across the metal/graphene/metal interfaces despite a substantial carrier concentration of 3x10^{12} cm^{-2} induced in the graphene.
  • The finite element analysis of high frequency vibrations of quartz crystal plates is a necessary process required in the design of quartz crystal resonators of precision types for applications in filters and sensors. The anisotropic materials and extremely high frequency in radiofrequency range of resonators determine that vibration frequency spectra are complicated with strong couplings of large number of different vibration modes representing deformations which do not appear in usual structural problems. For instance, the higher-order thickness-shear vibrations usually representing the sharp deformation of thin plates in the thickness direction, expecting the analysis is to be done with refined meshing schemes along the relatively small thickness and consequently the large plane area. To be able to represent the precise vibration mode shapes, a very large number of elements are needed in the finite element analysis with either the three-dimensional theory or the higher-order plate theory, although considerable reduction of numbers of degree-of-freedom (DOF) are expected for the two-dimensional analysis without scarifying the accuracy. In this paper, we reviewed the software architecture for the analysis and demonstrated the evaluation and tuning of parameters for the improvement of the analysis with problems of elements with a large number of DOF in each node, or a problem with unusually large bandwidth of the banded stiffness and mass matrices in comparison with conventional finite element formulation. Such a problem can be used as an example for the optimization and tuning of problems from multi-physics analysis which are increasingly important in applications with excessive large number of DOF and bandwidth in engineering.
  • Understanding cell-fate decisions during tumorigenesis and metastasis is a major challenge in modern cancer biology. One canonical cell-fate decision that cancer cells undergo is Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and its reverse Mesenchymal-to-Epithelial Transition (MET). While transitioning between these two phenotypes - epithelial and mesenchymal - cells can also attain a hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal (i.e. partial or intermediate EMT) phenotype. Cells in this phenotype have mixed epithelial (e.g. adhesion) and mesenchymal (e.g. migration) properties, thereby allowing them to move collectively as clusters of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs). If these clusters enter the circulation, they can be more apoptosis-resistant and more capable of initiating metastatic lesions than cancer cells moving individually with wholly mesenchymal phenotypes, having undergo a complete EMT. Here, we review the operating principles of the core regulatory network for EMT/MET that acts as a three-way switch giving rise to three distinct phenotypes - epithelial, mesenchymal and hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal. We further characterize this hybrid E/M phenotype in terms of its capabilities in terms of collective cell migration, tumor-initiation, cell-cell communication, and drug resistance. We elucidate how the highly interconnected coupling between these modules coordinates cell-fate decisions among a population of cancer cells in the dynamic tumor, hence facilitating tumor-stoma interactions, formation of CTC clusters, and consequently cancer metastasis. Finally, we discuss the multiple advantages that the hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal phenotype have as compared to a complete EMT phenotype and argue that these collectively migrating cells are the primary 'bad actors' of metastasis.
  • How to identify influential nodes in social networks is of theoretical significance, which relates to how to prevent epidemic spreading or cascading failure, how to accelerate information diffusion, and so on. In this Letter, we make an attempt to find \emph{effective multiple spreaders} in complex networks by generalizing the idea of the coloring problem in graph theory to complex networks. In our method, each node in a network is colored by one kind of color and nodes with the same color are sorted into an independent set. Then, for a given centrality index, the nodes with the highest centrality in an independent set are chosen as multiple spreaders. Comparing this approach with the traditional method, in which nodes with the highest centrality from the \emph{entire} network perspective are chosen, we find that our method is more effective in accelerating the spreading process and maximizing the spreading coverage than the traditional method, no matter in network models or in real social networks. Meanwhile, the low computational complexity of the coloring algorithm guarantees the potential applications of our method.
  • We established a method on measuring the $\dzdzb$ mixing parameter $y$ for BESIII experiment at the BEPCII $e^+e^-$ collider. In this method, the doubly tagged $\psi(3770) \to D^0 \overline{D^0}$ events, with one $D$ decays to CP-eigenstates and the other $D$ decays semileptonically, are used to reconstruct the signals. Since this analysis requires good $e/\pi$ separation, a likelihood approach, which combines the $dE/dx$, time of flight and the electromagnetic shower detectors information, is used for particle identification. We estimate the sensitivity of the measurement of $y$ to be 0.007 based on a $20fb^{-1}$ fully simulated MC sample.