• The iron-based superconductors are characterized by multiple-orbital physics where all the five Fe 3$d$ orbitals get involved. The multiple-orbital nature gives rise to various novel phenomena like orbital-selective Mott transition, nematicity and orbital fluctuation that provide a new route for realizing superconductivity. The complexity of multiple-orbital also asks to disentangle the relationship between orbital, spin and nematicity, and to identify dominant orbital ingredients that dictate superconductivity. The bulk FeSe superconductor provides an ideal platform to address these issues because of its simple crystal structure and unique coexistence of superconductivity and nematicity. However, the orbital nature of the low energy electronic excitations and its relation to the superconducting gap remain controversial. Here we report direct observation of highly anisotropic Fermi surface and extremely anisotropic superconducting gap in the nematic state of FeSe superconductor by high resolution laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements. We find that the low energy excitations of the entire hole pocket at the Brillouin zone center are dominated by the single $d_{xz}$ orbital. The superconducting gap exhibits an anti-correlation relation with the $d_{xz}$ spectral weight near the Fermi level, i.e., the gap size minimum (maximum) corresponds to the maximum (minimum) of the $d_{xz}$ spectral weight along the Fermi surface. These observations provide new insights in understanding the orbital origin of the extremely anisotropic superconducting gap in FeSe superconductor and the relation between nematicity and superconductivity in the iron-based superconductors.
  • We demonstrate imaging over the visible band using a single planar diffractive lens. This is enabled via multi-level diffractive optics that is designed to focus over a broad wavelength range, which we refer to as an achromatic diffractive lens (ADL). We designed, fabricated and characterized two ADLs with numerical apertures of 0.05 and 0.18. Diffraction-limited focusing is demonstrated for the NA=0.05 lens with measured focusing efficiency of over 40% across the entire visible spectrum (450nm to 750nm). We characterized the lenses with a monochromatic and a color CMOS sensor, and demonstrated video imaging under natural sunlight and other broadband illumination conditions. We use rigorous electromagnetic simulations to emphasize that ADLs can achieve high NA (0.9) and large operating bandwidth (300nm in the visible spectrum), a combination of metrics that have so far eluded other flat-lens technologies such as metalenses. These planar diffractive lenses can be cost-effectively manufactured over large areas and thereby, can enable the wide adoption of flat, low-cost lenses for a variety of imaging applications.
  • We report a combined theoretical and experimental study on TaIrTe4, a potential candidate of the minimal model of type-II Weyl semimetals. Unexpectedly, an intriguing node structure with twelve Weyl points and a pair of nodal lines protected by mirror symmetry was found by first-principle calculations, with its complex signatures such as the topologically non-trivial band crossings and topologically trivial Fermi arcs cross-validated by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Through external strain, the number of Weyl points can be reduced to the theoretical minimum of four, and the appearance of the nodal lines can be switched between different mirror planes in momentum space. The coexistence of tunable Weyl points and nodal lines establishes ternary transition-metal tellurides as a unique test ground for topological state characterization and engineering.
  • Recently, orthorhombic CuMnAs has been proposed to be a magnetic material where topological fermions exist around the Fermi level. Here we report the magnetic structure of the orthorhombic Cu0.95MnAs and Cu0.98Mn0.96As single crystals. While Cu0.95MnAs is a commensurate antiferromagnet (C-AFM) below 360 K with a propagation vector of k = 0, Cu0.98Mn0.96As undergoes a second-order paramagnetic to incommensurate antiferromagnetic (IC-AFM) phase transition at 320 K with k = (0.1,0,0), followed by a second-order IC-AFM to C-AFM phase transition at 230 K. In the C-AFM state, the Mn spins order parallel to the b-axis but antiparallel to their nearest-neighbors with the easy axis along the b axis. This magnetic order breaks Ry gliding and S2z rotational symmetries, the two crucial for symmetry analysis, resulting in finite band gaps at the crossing point and the disappearance of the massless topological fermions. However, the spin-polarized surface states and signature induced by non-trivial topology still can be observed in this system, which makes orthorhombic CuMnAs promising in antiferromagnetic spintronics.
  • WTe2 has attracted a great deal of attention because it exhibits extremely large and nonsaturating magnetoresistance. The underlying origin of such a giant magnetoresistance is still under debate. Utilizing laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with high energy and momentum resolutions, we reveal the complete electronic structure of WTe2. This makes it possible to determine accurately the electron and hole concentrations and their temperature dependence. We find that, with increasing the temperature, the overall electron concentration increases while the total hole concentration decreases. It indicates that the electron-hole compensation, if it exists, can only occur in a narrow temperature range, and in most of the temperature range there is an electron-hole imbalance. Our results are not consistent with the perfect electron-hole compensation picture that is commonly considered to be the cause of the unusual magnetoresistance in WTe2. We identified a flat band near the Brillouin zone center that is close to the Fermi level and exhibits a pronounced temperature dependence. Such a flat band can play an important role in dictating the transport properties of WTe2. Our results provide new insight on understanding the origin of the unusual magnetoresistance in WTe2.
  • We investigate systematically the bulk and surface electronic structure of the candidate nodal-line semimetal CaAgAs by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and density functional calculations. We observed a metallic, linear, non-$k_z$-dispersive surface band that coincides with the high-binding-energy part of the theoretical topological surface state, proving the topological nontriviality of the system. An overall downshift of the experimental Fermi level points to a rigid-band-like $p$-doping of the samples, due possibly to Ag vacancies in the as-grown crystals.
  • We report comprehensive angle-resolved photoemission investigations on the electronic structure of single crystal multiple-layer FeSe films grown on CaF2 substrate by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method. Measurements on FeSe/CaF2 samples with different superconducting transition temperatures Tc of 4 K, 9 K and 14 K reveal electronic difference in their Fermi surface and band structure. Indication of the nematic phase transition is observed from temperature-dependent measurements of these samples; the nematic transition temperature is 140-160 K, much higher than 90 K for the bulk FeSe. Potassium deposition is applied onto the surface of these samples; the nematic phase is suppressed by potassium deposition which introduces electrons to these FeSe films and causes a pronounced electronic structure change. We compared and discussed the electronic structure and superconductivity of the FeSe/CaF2 films by PLD method with the FeSe/SrTiO3 films by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) method and bulk FeSe. The PLD-grown multilayer FeSe/CaF2 is more hole-doped than that in MBE-grown multiple-layer FeSe films. Our results on FeSe/CaF2 films by PLD method establish a link between bulk FeSe single crystal and FeSe/SrTiO3 films by MBE method, and provide important information to understand superconductivity in FeSe-related systems.
  • We have carried out high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements on the Cebased heavy fermion compound CePt2In7 that exhibits stronger two-dimensional character than the prototypical heavy fermion system CeCoIn5. Multiple Fermi surface sheets and a complex band structure are clearly resolved. We have also performed detailed band structure calculations on CePt2In7. The good agreement found between our measurements and the calculations suggests that the band renormalization effect is rather weak in CePt2In7. A comparison of the common features of the electronic structure of CePt2In7 and CeCoIn5 indicates that CeCoIn5 shows a much stronger band renormalization effect than CePt2In7. These results provide new information for understanding the heavy fermion behaviors and unconventional superconductivity in Ce-based heavy fermion systems.
  • Topological semimetals are characterized by protected crossings between conduction and valence bands. These materials have recently attracted significant interest because of the deep connections to high-energy physics, the novel topological surface states, and the unusual transport phenomena. While Dirac and Weyl semimetals have been extensively studied, the nodal-line semimetal remains largely unexplored due to the lack of an ideal material platform. In this paper, we report the magneto-transport properties of two nodal-line semimetal candidates CaAgAs and CaCdGe. First, our single crystalline CaAgAs supports the first "hydrogen atom" nodal-line semimetal, where only the topological nodal-line is present at the Fermi level. Second, our CaCdGe sample provides an ideal platform to perform comparative studies because it features the same topological nodal line but has a more complicated Fermiology with irrelevant Fermi pockets. As a result, the magnetoresistance of our CaCdGe sample is more than 100 times larger than that of CaAgAs. Through our systematic magneto-transport and first-principles band structure calculations, we show that our CaTX compounds can be used to study, isolate, and control the novel topological nodal-line physics in real materials.
  • Quantum topological materials, exemplified by topological insulators, three-dimensional Dirac semimetals and Weyl semimetals, have attracted much attention recently because of their unique electronic structure and physical properties. Very lately it is proposed that the three-dimensional Weyl semimetals can be further classified into two types. In the type I Weyl semimetals, a topologically protected linear crossing of two bands, i.e., a Weyl point, occurs at the Fermi level resulting in a point-like Fermi surface. In the type II Weyl semimetals, the Weyl point emerges from a contact of an electron and a hole pocket at the boundary resulting in a highly tilted Weyl cone. In type II Weyl semimetals, the Lorentz invariance is violated and a fundamentally new kind of Weyl Fermions is produced that leads to new physical properties. WTe2 is interesting because it exhibits anomalously large magnetoresistance. It has ignited a new excitement because it is proposed to be the first candidate of realizing type II Weyl Fermions. Here we report our angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) evidence on identifying the type II Weyl Fermion state in WTe2. By utilizing our latest generation laser-based ARPES system with superior energy and momentum resolutions, we have revealed a full picture on the electronic structure of WTe2. Clear surface state has been identified and its connection with the bulk electronic states in the momentum and energy space shows a good agreement with the calculated band structures with the type II Weyl states. Our results provide spectroscopic evidence on the observation of type II Weyl states in WTe2. It has laid a foundation for further exploration of novel phenomena and physical properties in the type II Weyl semimetals.
  • Topological quantum materials, including topological insulators and superconductors, Dirac semimetals and Weyl semimetals, have attracted much attention recently for their unique electronic structure, spin texture and physical properties. Very lately, a new type of Weyl semimetals has been proposed where the Weyl Fermions emerge at the boundary between electron and hole pockets in a new phase of matter, which is distinct from the standard type I Weyl semimetals with a point-like Fermi surface. The Weyl cone in this type II semimetals is strongly tilted and the related Fermi surface undergos a Lifshitz transition, giving rise to a new kind of chiral anomaly and other new physics. MoTe2 is proposed to be a candidate of a type II Weyl semimetal; the sensitivity of its topological state to lattice constants and correlation also makes it an ideal platform to explore possible topological phase transitions. By performing laser-based angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) measurements with unprecedentedly high resolution, we have uncovered electronic evidence of type II semimetal state in MoTe2. We have established a full picture of the bulk electronic states and surface state for MoTe2 that are consistent with the band structure calculations. A single branch of surface state is identified that connects bulk hole pockets and bulk electron pockets. Detailed temperature-dependent ARPES measurements show high intensity spot-like features that is ~40 meV above the Fermi level and is close to the momentum space consistent with the theoretical expectation of the type II Weyl points. Our results constitute electronic evidence on the nature of the Weyl semimetal state that favors the presence of two sets of type II Weyl points in MoTe2.
  • We report the transport, thermodynamic, $\mu$SR and neutron study of the Ca$_{0.74(1)}$La$_{0.26(1)}$(Fe$_{1-x}$Co$_{x}$)As$_{2}$ single crystals, mapping out the temperature-doping level phase diagram. Upon Co substitution on the Fe site, the structural/magnetic phase transitions in this 112 compound are suppressed and superconductivity up to 20 K occurs. Our measurements of the superconducting and magnetic volume fractions show that these two phases coexist microscopically in the underdoped region, in contrast to the related 10-3-8 Ca$_{10}$(Pt$_{3}$As$_{8}$)((Fe$_{1-x}$Pt$_x$)$_{2}$As$_{2}$)$_{5}$ compound, where coexistence is absent. Supported by model calculations, we discuss the differences in the phase diagrams of the 112 and 10-3-8 compounds in terms of the FeAs interlayer coupling, whose strength is affected by the character of the spacer layer, which is metallic in the 112 and insulating in the 10-3-8.
  • We report transverse and longitudinal magneto-transport properties of NbAs2 single crystals. Attributing to the electron-hole compensation, non-saturating large transverse magnetoresistance reaches up to 8000 at 9 T at 1.8 K with mobility around 1 to 2 m^2V^-1S^-1. We present a thorough study of angular-dependent Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) quantum oscillations of NbAs2. Three distinct oscillation frequencies are identified. First-principles calculations reveal four types of Fermi pockets: electron alpha pocket, hole beta pocket, hole gamma pocket and small electron delta pocket. Although the angular dependence of alpha, beta and delta agree well with the SdH data, it is unclear why the gamma pocket is missing in SdH. Negative longitudinal magnetoresistance is observed which may be linked to novel topological states in this material, although systematic study is necessary to ascertain its origin.
  • The importance of charge reservoir layers for supplying holes to the CuO$_2$ planes of cuprate superconductors has long been recognized. Less attention has been paid to the screening of the charge transfer by the intervening ionic layers. We address this issue in the case of YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{6+x}$, where CuO chains supply the holes for the planes. We present a simple dielectric-screening model that gives a linear correlation between the relative displacements of ions along the $c$ axis, determined by neutron powder diffraction, and the hole density of the planes. Applying this model to the temperature dependent shifts of ions along the $c$ axis, we infer a charge transfer of 5-10% of the hole density from the planes to the chains on warming from the superconducting transition to room temperature. Given the significant coupling of $c$-axis displacements to the average charge density, we point out the relevance of local displacements for screening charge modulations and note recent evidence for dynamic screening of in-plane quasiparticles. This line of argument leads us to a simple model for atomic displacements and charge modulation that is consistent with images from scanning-tunneling microscopy for underdoped Bi$_2$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_{8+\delta}$.
  • The topological materials have attracted much attention recently. While three-dimensional topological insulators are becoming abundant, two-dimensional topological insulators remain rare, particularly in natural materials. ZrTe5 has host a long-standing puzzle on its anomalous transport properties; its underlying origin remains elusive. Lately, ZrTe5 has ignited renewed interest because it is predicted that single-layer ZrTe5 is a two-dimensional topological insulator and there is possibly a topological phase transition in bulk ZrTe5. However, the topological nature of ZrTe5 is under debate as some experiments point to its being a three-dimensional or quasi-two-dimensional Dirac semimetal. Here we report high-resolution laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements on ZrTe5. The electronic property of ZrTe5 is dominated by two branches of nearly-linear-dispersion bands at the Brillouin zone center. These two bands are separated by an energy gap that decreases with decreasing temperature but persists down to the lowest temperature we measured (~2 K). The overall electronic structure exhibits a dramatic temperature dependence; it evolves from a p-type semimetal with a hole-like Fermi pocket at high temperature, to a semiconductor around ~135 K where its resistivity exhibits a peak, to an n-type semimetal with an electron-like Fermi pocket at low temperature. These results indicate a clear electronic evidence of the temperature-induced Lifshitz transition in ZrTe5. They provide a natural understanding on the underlying origin of the resistivity anomaly at ~135 K and its associated reversal of the charge carrier type. Our observations also provide key information on deciphering the topological nature of ZrTe5 and possible temperature-induced topological phase transition.
  • The mechanism of high temperature superconductivity in the iron-based superconductors remains an outstanding issue in condensed matter physics. The electronic structure, in particular the Fermi surface topology, is considered to play an essential role in dictating the superconductivity. Recent revelation of distinct electronic structure and possible high temperature superconductivity with a transition temperature Tc above 65 K in the single-layer FeSe films grown on the SrTiO3 substrate provides key information on the roles of Fermi surface topology and interface in inducing or enhancing superconductivity. Here we report high resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurement on the electronic structure and superconducting gap of a novel FeSe-based superconductor, (Li0.84Fe0.16)OHFe0.98Se, with a Tc at 41 K. We find that this single-phase bulk superconductor shows remarkably similar electronic behaviors to that of the superconducting single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 film in terms of Fermi surface topology, band structure and nearly isotropic superconducting gap without nodes. These observations provide significant insights in understanding high temperature superconductivity in the single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 film in particular, and the mechanism of superconductivity in the iron-based superconductors in general.
  • The FeSe superconductor and its related systems have attracted much attention in the iron-based superconductors owing to their simple crystal structure and peculiar electronic and physical properties. The bulk FeSe superconductor has a superconducting transition temperature (Tc) of ~8 K; it can be dramatically enhanced to 37 K at high pressure. On the other hand, its cousin system, FeTe, possesses a unique antiferromagnetic ground state but is non-superconducting. Substitution of Se by Te in the FeSe superconductor results in an enhancement of Tc up to 14.5 K and superconductivity can persist over a large composition range in the Fe(Se,Te) system. Intercalation of the FeSe superconductor leads to the discovery of the AxFe2-ySe2 (A=K, Cs and Tl) system that exhibits a Tc higher than 30 K and a unique electronic structure of the superconducting phase. The latest report of possible high temperature superconductivity in the single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films with a Tc above 65 K has generated much excitement in the community. This pioneering work opens a door for interface superconductivity to explore for high Tc superconductors. The distinct electronic structure and superconducting gap, layer-dependent behavior and insulator-superconductor transition of the FeSe/SrTiO3 films provide critical information in understanding the superconductivity mechanism of the iron-based superconductors. In this paper, we present a brief review on the investigation of the electronic structure and superconductivity of the FeSe superconductor and related systems, with a particular focus on the FeSe films.
  • We study the antiferromagnetic (AFM) and structural phase transitions in single crystal $BaFe_2(As_{1-x}P_x)_2$ $(x=0, 0.3)$ at temperatures $T_N$ and $T_S$, respectively, by high resolution ac microcalorimetry and SQUID magnetometry. The specific heat measurements of both as grown and annealed $BaFe_2As_2$ displays a sharp peak at the AFM/Structural transitions. A kink in the entropy of annealed $BaFe_2As_2$ gives evidence for splitting of the two transitions by approximately 0.5K. No additional features could be identified in the specific heat of both $BaFe_2As_2$ and $BaFe_2(As_{0.7}P_{0.3})_2$ in the temperature regions around $T^*$ > $T_S$ where torque measurements [S. Kasahara et al., Nature 486, 382 (2012)] had revealed the "true" nematic phase transition, indicating that the behavior at $T^*$ does not represent a 2nd order phase transition, and that the phase transition of $BaFe_2(As_{1-x}P_x)_2$ into the orthorhombic phase does occur at $T_S$.
  • The in-plane London penetration depth, $\Delta\lambda(T)$, was measured using a tunnel diode resonator technique in single crystals of Ba$_{1-x}$K$_{x}$Fe$_{2}$As$_{2}$ with doping levels $x$ ranging from heavily underdoped, $x$=0.16 ($T_{c}$=7~K) to nearly optimally doped, $x$= 0.34 ($T_{c}=$39 K). Exponential saturation of $\Delta\lambda(T)$ in the $T\to0$ limit is found in optimally doped samples, with the superfluid density $\rho_{s}(T)\equiv(\lambda(0)/\lambda(T))^{2}$ quantitatively described by a self-consistent $\gamma$-model with two nodeless isotropic superconducting gaps. As the doping level is decreased towards the extreme end of the superconducting dome at $x$=0.16, the low-temperature behavior of $\Delta\lambda(T)$ becomes non-exponential and best described by the power-law $\Delta\lambda(T)\propto T^{2}$, characteristic of strongly anisotropic gaps. The change between the two regimes happens within the range of coexisting magnetic/nematic order and superconductivity, $x<0.25$, and is accompanied by a rapid rise in the absolute value of $\Delta\lambda(T)$ with underdoping. This effect, characteristic of the competition between superconductivity and other ordered states, is very similar to but of significantly smaller magnitude than what is observed in the electron-doped Ba(Fe$_{1-x}$Co$_{x}$)$_{2}$As$_{2}$ compounds. Our study suggests that the competition between superconductivity and magnetic/nematic order in hole-doped compounds is weaker than in electron-doped compounds, and that the anisotropy of the superconducting state in the underdoped iron pnictides is a consequence of the anisotropic changes in the pairing interaction and in the gap function promoted by both magnetic and nematic long-range order.
  • Temperature-dependent inter-plane resistivity, $\rho _c(T)$, was measured in hole-doped iron-arsenide superconductor (Ba$_{1-x}$K$_x$)Fe$_2$As$_2$ over a doping range from parent compound to optimal doping $T_c\approx 38~K$, $0\leq x \leq 0.34$. Measurements were undertaken on high-quality single crystals grown from FeAs flux. The coupled magnetic/structural transition at $T_{SM}$ leads to clear accelerated decrease of $\rho_c(T)$ on cooling in samples with $T_c <$26~K ($x <0.25$). This decrease in hole-doped material is in notable contrast to an increase in $\rho_c(T)$ in the electron-doped Ba(Fe$_{1-x}$Co$_x$)Fe $_2$As$_2$ and iso-electron substituted BaFe$_2$(As$_{1-x}$P$_x$)$_2$. The $T_{SM}$ decreases very sharply with doping, dropping from $T_s$=71~K to zero on increase of $T_c$ from approximately 25 to 27~K. The $\rho_c(T)$ becomes $T$-linear close to optimal doping. The broad crossover maximum in $\rho_c(T)$, found in the parent BaFe$_2$As$_2$ at around $T_{max} \sim$200~K, shifts to higher temperature $\sim$250~K with doping $x$=0.34. The maximum shows clear correlation with the broad crossover feature found in the temperature-dependent in-plane resistivity $\rho_a(T)$. The doping evolution of $T_{max}$ in (Ba$_{1-x}$K$_x$)Fe$_2$As$_2$ is in notable contrast with both rapid suppression of $T_{max}$ found in Ba(Fe$_{1-x}TM_x$)$_2$As$_2$ ($TM$=Co,Rh,Ni,Pd) and its rapid increase BaFe$_2$(As$_{1-x}$P$_x$)$_2$. This observation suggest that pseudogap features are much stronger in hole-doped than in electron-doped iron-based superconductors, revealing significant electron-hole doping asymmetry similar to the cuprates. This paper replaces: cond-mat:1106.0533.
  • Superconducting condensation energy $U_0^{int}$ has been determined by integrating the electronic entropy in various iron pnictide/chalcogenide superconducting systems. It is found that $U_0^{int}\propto T_c^n$ with $n$ = 3 to 4, which is in sharp contrast to the simple BCS prediction $U_0^{BCS}=1/2N_F\Delta_s^2$ with $N_F$ the quasiparticle density of states at the Fermi energy, $\Delta_s$ the superconducting gap. A similar correlation holds if we compute the condensation energy through $U_0^{cal}=3\gamma_n^{eff}\Delta_s^2/4\pi^2k_B^2$ with $\gamma_n^{eff}$ the effective normal state electronic specific heat coefficient. This indicates a general relationship $\gamma_n^{eff} \propto T_c^m$ with $m$ = 1 to 2, which is not predicted by the BCS scheme. A picture based on quantum criticality is proposed to explain this phenomenon.
  • The (Ca,R)FeAs2 (R=La,Pr and etc.) superconductors with a signature of superconductivity transition above 40 K possess a new kind of block layers that consist of zig-zag As chains. In this paper, we report the electronic structure of the new (Ca,La)FeAs2 superconductor investigated by both band structure calculations and high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements. Band structure calculations indicate that there are four hole-like bands around the zone center $\Gamma$(0,0) and two electron-like bands near the zone corner M(pi,pi) in CaFeAs2. In our angle-resolved photoemission measurements on (Ca0.9La0.1})FeAs2, we have observed three hole-like bands around the Gamma point and one electron-like Fermi surface near the M(pi,pi) point. These results provide important information to compare and contrast with the electronic structure of other iron-based compounds in understanding the superconductivity mechanism in the iron-based superconductors.
  • Since the discovery of high temperature superconductivity in the iron pnictides and chalcogenides in early 2008, a central issue has been the microscopic origin of the superconducting pairing. Although previous experiments suggest that the pairing may be induced by exchanging the antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations and the superconducting order parameter has opposite signs in the electron and hole pockets as predicted by the S+- pairing model, it remains unclear whether there is a bosonic mode from the tunneling spectrum which has a close and universal relationship with superconductivity as well as the spin excitation. In this paper, based on the measurements of scanning tunneling spectroscopy, we show the clear evidence of a bosonic mode with the energy identical to that of the neutron spin resonance in two completely different systems Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2 and Na(Fe0.975Co0.025)As with different superconducting transition temperatures. In both samples, the superconducting coherence peaks and the mode feature vanish simultaneously inside the vortex core or above Tc, indicating a close relationship between superconductivity and the bosonic mode. Our data also demonstrate a universal ratio between the mode energy and superconducting transition temperature, that is [mode energy]/kBTc ~ 4.3, which underlines the unconventional mechanism of superconductivity in the iron pnictide superconductors.
  • Low-temperature specific heat is measured on the overdoped Ba(Fe_{1-x}Co_x)_2As_2 (x = 0.13) single crystal under magnetic fields along three different directions. A clear anisotropy is observed on the field dependent electronic specific heat coefficient {\gamma}(H). The value of {\gamma}(H) is obviously larger with magnetic field along [001] (c-axis) than that within the ab-plane of the crystal lattice, which cannot be attributed to the effect by anisotropy of the upper critical field. Meanwhile, the data show a rather small difference when the direction of the field is rotated from [100] to [110] direction within the ab-plane. Our results suggest that a considerable part of the line nodes is not excited to contribute to the quasiparticle density of states by the field when the field is within the ab-plane. The constraints on the topology of the gap nodes are discussed based on our observations.
  • Copper and Nickel impurities have been doped into the iron pnictide superconductor Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2. Resistivity measurements reveal that Cu and Ni impurities suppress superconducting transition temperature T_c with rates of \Delta T_c/Cu-1% = -3.5 K and \Delta T_c/Ni-1% = -2.9 K respectively. Temperature dependence of Hall coefficient R_H of these two series of samples show that both Cu-doping and Ni-doping can introduce electrons into Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2. With more doping, the sign of R_H gradually changes from positive to negative, while the changing rate of Cu-doped samples is much faster than that of Ni-doped ones. Combining with the results of first-principles calculations published previously and the non-monotonic evolution of the Hall coefficient in the low temperature region, we argue that when more Cu impurities were introduced into Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2, the removal of Fermi spectral weight in the hole-like Fermi surfaces is much stronger than that in the electron-like Fermi surfaces, which is equivalent to significant electron doping effect. DC magnetization and the lattice constants analysis reveal that static magnetic moments and notable lattice compression have been formed in Cu-doped samples. It seems that the superconductivity can be suppressed by the impurities disregard whether they are magnetic or nonmagnetic in nature. This gives strong support to a pairing gap with a sign reversal, like S^\pm. However, the relatively slow suppression rates of T_c show the robustness of superconductivity of Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2 against impurities, implying that multi-pairing channels may exist in the system.