• Common envelope evolution (CEE) is presently a poorly understood, yet critical, process in binary stellar evolution. Characterizing the full 3D dynamics of CEE is difficult in part because simulating CEE is so computationally demanding. Numerical studies have yet to conclusively determine how the envelope ejects and a tight binary results, if only the binary potential energy is used to propel the envelope. Additional power sources might be necessary and accretion onto the inspiraling companion is one such source. Accretion is likely common in post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) binary interactions but how it operates and how its consequences depend on binary separation remain open questions. Here we use high resolution global 3D hydrodynamic simulations of CEE with the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code AstroBEAR, to bracket the range of CEE companion accretion rates by comparing runs that remove mass and pressure via a subgrid accretion model with those that do not. The results show that if a pressure release valve is available, super-Eddington accretion may be common. Jets are a plausible release valve in these environments, and they could also help unbind and shape the envelopes.
  • Subgraph counting aims to count the number of occurrences of a subgraph T (aka as a template) in a given graph G. The basic problem has found applications in diverse domains. The problem is known to be computationally challenging - the complexity grows both as a function of T and G. Recent applications have motivated solving such problems on massive networks with billions of vertices. In this chapter, we study the subgraph counting problem from a parallel computing perspective. We discuss efficient parallel algorithms for approximately resolving subgraph counting problems by using the color-coding technique. We then present several system-level strategies to substantially improve the overall performance of the algorithm in massive subgraph counting problems. We propose: 1) a novel pipelined Adaptive-Group communication pattern to improve inter-node scalability, 2) a fine-grained pipeline design to effectively reduce the memory space of intermediate results, 3) partitioning neighbor lists of subgraph vertices to achieve better thread concurrency and workload balance. Experimentation on an Intel Xeon E5 cluster shows that our implementation achieves 5x speedup of performance compared to the state-of-the-art work while reduces the peak memory utilization by a factor of 2 on large templates of 12 to 15 vertices and input graphs of 2 to 5 billions of edges.
  • Biexcitons are a manifestation of many-body excitonic interactions crucial for quantum information and quantum computation in the construction of coherent combinations of quantum states. However, due to their small binding energy and low transition efficiency, most biexcitons in conventional semiconductors exist either at cryogenic temperature or under femtosecond pulse laser excitation. Here we demonstrate room temperature, continuous wave driven biexciton states in CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystals through coupling with a plasmonic nanogap. The room temperature CsPbBr3 biexciton excitation fluence (~100 mW/cm2) is reduced by ~10^13 times in the Ag nanowire-film nanogaps. The giant enhancement of biexciton emission is driven by coherent biexciton-plasmon Fano interference. These results provide new pathways to develop high efficiency non-blinking single photon sources, entangled light sources and lasers based on biexciton states.
  • Two-dimensional (2D) transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) MX$_2$ (M = Mo, W; X= S, Se, Te) possess unique properties and novel applications. In this work, we perform first-principles calculations on the van der Waals (vdW) stacked MX$_2$ heterostructures to investigate their electronic, optical and transport properties systematically. We perform the so-called Anderson's rule to classify the heterostructures by providing the scheme of the construction of energy band diagrams for the heterostructure consisting of two semiconductor materials. For most of the MX$_2$ heterostructures, the conduction band maximum (CBM) and valence band minimum (VBM) reside in two separate semiconductors, forming type II band structure, thus the electron-holes pairs are spatially separated. We also find strong interlayer coupling at $\Gamma$ point after forming MX$_2$ heterostructures, even leading to the indirect band gap. While the band structure near $K$ point remain as the independent monolayer. The carrier mobilities of MX$_2$ heterostructures depend on three decisive factors, elastic modulus, effective mass and deformation potential constant, which are discussed and contrasted with those of monolayer MX$_2$, respectively.
  • It is known that some active galactic nuclei (AGNs) transited from type 1 to type 2 or vice versa. There are two explanations for the so-called changing look AGNs: one is the dramatic change of the obscuration along the line-of-sight, the other is the variation of accretion rate. In this paper, we report the detection of large amplitude variations in the mid-infrared luminosity during the transitions in 10 changing look AGNs using WISE and newly released NEOWISE-R data. The mid-infrared light curves of 10 objects echoes the variability in the optical band with a time lag expected for dust reprocessing. The large variability amplitude is inconsistent with the scenario of varying obscuration, rather supports the scheme of dramatic change in the accretion rate.
  • We present the mid-infrared (MIR) light curves (LCs) of a tidal disruption event (TDE) candidate in the center of a nearby ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) F01004-2237 using archival {\it WISE} and {\it NEOWISE} data from 2010 to 2016. At the peak of the optical flare, F01004-2237 was IR quiescent. About three years later, its MIR fluxes have shown a steady increase, rising by 1.34 and 1.04 mag in $3.4$ and $4.6\mu$m up to the end of 2016. The host-subtracted MIR peak luminosity is $2-3\times10^{44}$\,erg\,s$^{-1}$. We interpret the MIR LCs as an infrared echo, i.e. dust reprocessed emission of the optical flare. Fitting the MIR LCs using our dust model, we infer a dust torus of the size of a few parsecs at some inclined angle. The derived dust temperatures range from $590-850$\,K, and the warm dust mass is $\sim7\,M_{\odot}$. Such a large mass implies that the dust cannot be newly formed. We also derive the UV luminosity of $4-11\times10^{44}$\,erg\,s$^{-1}$. The inferred total IR energy is $1-2\times10^{52}$\,erg, suggesting a large dust covering factor. Finally, our dust model suggests that the long tail of the optical flare could be due to dust scattering.
  • The extraordinary properties and the novel applications of black phosphorene induce the research interest on the monolayer group-IV monochalcogenides. Here using the first-principles calculations, we systematically investigate the electronic, transport and optical properties of monolayer $\alpha-$ and $\beta-$GeSe, the latter of which was recently experimentally realized. We found that, monolayer $\alpha-$GeSe is a semiconductor with direct band gap of 1.6 eV, and $\beta-$GeSe displays indirect semiconductor with the gap of 2.47 eV, respectively. For monolayer $\beta-$GeSe, the electronic/hole transport is anisotropic with an extremely high electron mobility of 7.84 $\times10^4$$cm^2/V\cdot {s}$ along the zigzag direction, comparable to that of black phosphorene. Furthermore, for $\beta-$GeSe, robust band gaps nearly disregarding the applied tensile strain along the zigzag direction is observed. Both monolayer $\alpha-$ and $\beta-$GeSe exhibit anisotropic optical absorption in the visible spectrum.
  • In scaling of transistor dimensions with low source-to-drain currents, 1D semiconductors with certain electronic properties are highly desired. We discover three new 1D materials, SbSeI, SbSI and SbSBr with high stability and novel electronic properties based on first principles calculations. Both dynamical and thermal stability of these 1D materials are examined. The bulk-to-1D transition results in dramatic changes in band gap, effective mass and static dielectric constant due to quantum confinement, making 1D SbSeI a highly promising channel material for transistors with gate length shorter than 1 nm. Under small uniaxial strain, these materials are transformed from indirect into direct band gap semiconductors, paving the way for optoelectronic devices and mechanical sensors. Moreover, the thermoelectric performance of these materials is significantly improved over their bulk counterparts. Finally, we demonstrate the experimental feasibility of synthesizing such atomically sharp V-VI-VII compounds. These highly desirable properties render SbSeI, SbSI and SbSBr promising 1D materials for applications in future microelectronics, optoelectronics, mechanical sensors, and thermoelectrics.
  • Using the first-principles calculations based on density functional theory, we systematically investigate the strain-engineering (tensile and compressive strain) electronic, mechanical and transport properties of monolayer penta-SiC$_2$. By applying an in-plane tensile or compressive strain, it is easy to modulate the electronic band structure of monolayer penta-SiC$_2$, which subsequently changes the effective mass of carriers. Furthermore, the obtained electronic properties are predicted to change from indirectly semiconducting to metallic. More interestingly, at room temperature, uniaxial strain can enhance the hole mobility of penta-SiC$_2$ along a particular direction by almost three order in magnitude, $i.e.$ from 2.59 $\times10^3 cm^2/V s$ to 1.14 $\times10^6 cm^2/V s$ (larger than the carrier mobility of graphene, 3.5 $\times10^5 cm^2/V s$), with little influence on the electron mobility. The high carrier mobility of monolayer penta-SiC$_2$ may lead to many potential applications in high-performance electronic and optoelectronic devices
  • It has been argued that stanene has lowest lattice thermal conductivity among 2D group-IV materials because of largest atomic mass, weakest interatomic bonding, and enhanced ZA phonon scattering due to the breaking of an out-of-plane symmetry selection rule. However, we show that although the lattice thermal conductivity $\kappa$ for graphene, silicene and germanene decreases monotonically with decreasing Debye temperature, unexpected higher $\kappa$ is observed in stanene. By enforcing all the invariance conditions in 2D materials and including Ge $3d$ and Sn $4d$ electrons as valence electrons for germanene and stanene respectively, the lattice dynamics in these materials are accurately described. A large acoustic-optical gap and the bunching of the acoustic phonon branches significantly reduce phonon scattering in stanene, leading to higher thermal conductivity than germanene. The vibrational origin of the acoustic-optical gap can be attributed to the buckled structure. Interestingly, a buckled system has two competing influences on phonon transport: the breaking of the symmetry selection rule leads to reduced thermal conductivity, and the enlarging of the acoustic-optical gap results in enhanced thermal conductivity. The size dependence of thermal conductivity is investigated as well. In nanoribbons, the $\kappa$ of silicene, germanene and stanene is much less sensitive to size effect due to their short intrinsic phonon mean free paths. This work sheds light on the nature of phonon transport in buckled 2D materials.
  • A new two-dimensional (2D) material, borophene (2D boron sheet), has been grown successfully recently on single crystal Ag substrates by two parallel experiments [Mannix \textit{et al., Science}, 2015, \textbf{350}, 1513] [Feng \textit{et al., Nature Chemistry}, 2016, \textbf{advance online publication}]. Three main structures have been proposed ($\beta_{12}$, $\chi_3$ and striped borophene). However, the stability of three structures is still in debate. Using first principles calculations, we examine the dynamical, thermodynamical and mechanical stability of $\beta_{12}$, $\chi_3$ and striped borophene. Free-standing $\beta_{12}$ and $\chi_3$ borophene is dynamically, thermodynamically, and mechanically stable, while striped borophene is dynamically and thermodynamically unstable due to high stiffness along $a$ direction. The origin of high stiffness and high instability in striped borophene along $a$ direction can both be attributed to strong directional bonding. This work provides a benchmark for examining the relative stability of different structures of borophene.
  • Recently a stable monolayer of antimony in buckled honeycomb structure called antimonene was successfully grown on 3D topological insulator Bi$_2$Te$_3$ and Sb$_2$Te$_3$, which displays semiconducting properties. By first principle calculations, we systematically investigate the phononic, electronic and optical properties of $\alpha-$ and $\beta-$ allotropes of monolayer arsenene/antimonene. We investigate the dynamical stabilities of these four materials by considering the phonon dispersions. The obtained electronic structures reveal the direct band gap of monolayer $\alpha-$As/Sb and indirect band gap of $\beta-$As/Sb. Significant absorption is observed in $\alpha-$Sb, which can be used as a broad saturable absorber.
  • Borophene (two-dimensional boron sheet) is a new type of two-dimensional material, which was recently grown successfully on single crystal Ag substrates. In this paper, we investigate the electronic structure and bonding characteristics of borophene by first-principle calculations. The band structure of borophene shows highly anisotropic metallic behaviour. The obtained optical properties of borophene exhibit strong anisotropy as well. The combination of high optical transparency and high electrical conductivity in borophene makes it a promising candidate for future design of transparent conductors used in photovoltaics. Finally, the thermodynamic properties are investigated based on the phonon properties.
  • A fundamental understanding of phonon transport in stanene is crucial to predict the thermal performance in potential stanene-based devices. By combining first-principle calculation and phonon Boltzmann transport equation, we obtain the lattice thermal conductivity of stanene. A much lower thermal conductivity (11.6 W/mK) is observed in stanene, which indicates higher thermoelectric efficiency over other 2D materials. The contributions of acoustic and optical phonons to the lattice thermal conductivity are evaluated. Detailed analysis of phase space for three-phonon processes shows that phonon scattering channels LA+LA/TA/ZA$\leftrightarrow$TA/ZA are restricted, leading to the dominant contributions of high-group-velocity LA phonons to the thermal conductivity. The size dependence of thermal conductivity is investigated as well for the purpose of the design of thermoelectric nanostructures.
  • The intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity of MoS$_2$ is an important aspect in the design of MoS$_2$-based nanoelectronic devices. We investigate the lattice dynamics properties of MoS$_2$ by first principles calculations. The intrinsic thermal conductivity of single-layer MoS$_2$ is calculated using the Boltzmann transport equation for phonons. The obtained thermal conductivity agrees well with the measurements. The contributions of acoustic and optical phonons to the lattice thermal conductivity are evaluated. The size dependence of thermal conductivity is investigated as well.
  • Nonreciprocal devices that permit wave transmission in only one direction are indispensible in many fields of science including, e.g., electronics, optics, acoustics, and thermodynamics. Manipulating phonons using such nonreciprocal devices may have a range of applications such as phonon diodes, transistors, switches, etc. One way of achieving nonreciprocal phononic devices is to use materials with strong nonlinear response to phonons. However, it is not easy to obtain the required strong mechanical nonlinearity, especially for few-phonon situations. Here, we present a general mechanism to amplify nonlinearity using $\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric structures, and show that an on-chip micro-scale phonon diode can be fabricated using a $\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric mechanical system, in which a lossy mechanical-resonator with very weak mechanical nonlinearity is coupled to a mechanical resonator with mechanical gain but no mechanical nonlinearity. When this coupled system transits from the $\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric regime to the broken-$\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric regime, the mechanical nonlinearity is transferred from the lossy resonator to the one with gain, and the effective nonlinearity of the system is significantly enhanced. This enhanced mechanical nonlinearity is almost lossless because of the gain-loss balance induced by the $\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric structure. Such an enhanced lossless mechanical nonlinearity is then used to control the direction of phonon propagation, and can greatly decrease (by over three orders of magnitude) the threshold of the input-field intensity necessary to observe the unidirectional phonon transport. We propose an experimentally realizable lossless low-threshold phonon diode of this type. Our study opens up new perspectives for constructing on-chip few-phonon devices and hybrid phonon-photon components.
  • We propose and analyze a new approach based on parity-time ($\mathcal{PT}$) symmetric microcavities with balanced gain and loss to enhance the performance of cavity-assisted metrology. We identify the conditions under which $\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric microcavities allow to improve sensitivity beyond what is achievable in loss-only systems. We discuss its application to the detection of mechanical motion, and show that the sensitivity is significantly enhanced in the vicinity of the transition point from unbroken- to broken-$\mathcal{PT}$ regimes. We believe that our results open a new direction for $\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric physical systems and it may find use in ultra-high precision metrology and sensing.
  • Phonons are essential for understanding the thermal properties in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, which limit their thermal performance for potential applications. We investigate the lattice dynamics and thermodynamic properties of MoS2, MoSe2, and WS2 by first principles calculations. The obtained phonon frequencies and thermal conductivities agree well with the measurements. Our results show that the thermal conductivity of MoS2 is highest among the three materials due to its much lower average atomic mass. We also discuss the competition between mass effect, interatomic bonding and anharmonic vibrations in determining the thermal conductivity of WS2. Strong covalent W-S bonding and low anharmonicity in WS2 are found to be crucial in understanding its much higher thermal conductivity compared to MoSe2.
  • The missing baryons are usually thought to reside in galaxy filaments as warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM). From previous studies, giant radio galaxies are usually associated with galaxy groups, which normally trace the WHIM. We propose observations with the powerful SKA1 to make a census of giant radio galaxies in the southern hemisphere, which will probe the ambient WHIM. The radio galaxies discovered will also be investigated to search for dying radio sources. With the highly improved sensitivity and resolution of SKA1, more than 6,000 giant radio sources will be discovered within 250 hours.
  • Electromagnetically-induced-transparency (EIT) and Autler-Townes splitting (ATS) are two prominent examples of coherent interactions between optical fields and multilevel atoms. They have been observed in various physical systems involving atoms, molecules, meta-structures and plasmons. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the implementations of all-optical analogues of EIT and ATS via the interacting resonant modes of one or more optical microcavities. Despite the differences in their underlying physics, both EIT and ATS are quantified by the appearance of a transparency window in the absorption or transmission spectrum, which often leads to a confusion about its origin. While in EIT the transparency window is a result of Fano interference among different transition pathways, in ATS it is the result of strong field-driven interactions leading to the splitting of energy levels. Being able to tell objectively whether a transparency window observed in the spectrum is due to EIT or ATS is crucial for clarifying the physics involved and for practical applications. Here we report a systematic study of the pathways leading to EIT, Fano, and ATS, in systems of two coupled whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microtoroidal resonators. Moreover, we report for the first time the application of the Akaike Information Criterion discerning between all-optical analogues of EIT and ATS, and clarifying the transition between them.
  • Whispering gallery mode resonators (WGMRs) take advantage of strong light confinement and long photon lifetime for applications in sensing, optomechanics, microlasers and quantum optics. However, their rotational symmetry and low radiation loss impede energy exchange between WGMs and the surrounding. As a result, free-space coupling of light into and from WGMRs is very challenging. In previous schemes, resonators are intentionally deformed to break circular symmetry to enable free-space coupling of carefully aligned focused light, which comes with bulky size and alignment issue that hinder the realization of compact WGMR applications. Here, we report a new class of nanocouplers based on cavity enhanced Rayleigh scattering from nano-scatterer(s) on resonator surface, and demonstrate whispering gallery microlaser by free-space optical pumping of an Ytterbium doped silica microtoroid via the scatterers. This new scheme will not only expand the range of applications enabled by WGMRs, but also provide a possible route to integrate them into solar powered green photonics.
  • We present an algorithm that incorporates a tabu search procedure into the framework of path relinking to tackle the job shop scheduling problem (JSP). This tabu search/path relinking (TS/PR) algorithm comprises several distinguishing features, such as a specific relinking procedure and a reference solution determination method. To test the performance of TS/PR, we apply it to tackle almost all of the benchmark JSP instances available in the literature. The test results show that TS/PR obtains competitive results compared with state-of-the-art algorithms for JSP in the literature, demonstrating its efficacy in terms of both solution quality and computational efficiency. In particular, TS/PR is able to improve the upper bounds for 49 out of the 205 tested instances and it solves a challenging instance that has remained unsolved for over 20 years.
  • Recently optical whispering-gallery-mode resonators (WGMRs) have emerged as promising platforms to achieve label-free detection of nanoscale objects and to reach single molecule sensitivity. The ultimate detection performance of WGMRs are limited by energy dissipation in the material they are fabricated from. Up to date, to improve detection limit, either rare-earth ions are doped into the WGMR to compensate losses or plasmonic resonances are exploited for their superior field confinement. Here, we demonstrate, for the first time, enhanced detection of single-nanoparticle induced mode-splitting in a silica WGMR via Raman-gain assisted loss-compensation and WGM Raman lasing. Notably, we detected and counted individual dielectric nanoparticles down to a record low radius of 10 nm by monitoring a beatnote signal generated when split Raman lasing lines are heterodyne-mixed at a photodetector. This dopant-free scheme retains the inherited biocompatibility of silica, and could find widespread use for sensing in biological media. It also opens the possibility of using intrinsic Raman or parametric gain in other systems, where dissipation hinders the progress of the field and limits applications.
  • Optical systems combining balanced loss and gain profiles provide a unique platform to implement classical analogues of quantum systems described by non-Hermitian parity-time- (PT-) symmetric Hamiltonians and to originate new synthetic materials with novel properties. To date, experimental works on PT-symmetric optical systems have been limited to waveguides in which resonances do not play a role. Here we report the first demonstration of PT-symmetry breaking in optical resonator systems by using two directly coupled on-chip optical whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microtoroid silica resonators. Gain in one of the resonators is provided by optically pumping Erbium (Er3+) ions embedded in the silica matrix; the other resonator exhibits passive loss. The coupling strength between the resonators is adjusted by using nanopositioning stages to tune their distance. We have observed reciprocal behavior of the PT-symmetric system in the linear regime, as well as a transition to nonreciprocity in the PT symmetry-breaking phase transition due to the significant enhancement of nonlinearity in the broken-symmetry phase. Our results represent a significant advance towards a new generation of synthetic optical systems enabling on-chip manipulation and control of light propagation.
  • Herein, we describe new methods to produce colloidal particle chains of three stiffness regimes that can be observed on a single-particle level, that is, on the level of the monomers that make up the chain; the chains can even be observed in concentrated systems without using molecular tracers. These methods rely on the following: dipolar interactions induced by external electric fields in combination with long-range charge repulsion to assemble the particles into chains only, and a bonding step to ensure that the particles remain assembled as chains even after the external field is switched off. We can control the length and the flexibility of the chains. Additionally, we demonstrate that our method is generally applicable by using it to prepare several other colloidal polymers, such as block-copolymer chains, which are formed by combining rigid and flexible chains, spherocylinders, which are formed by heating rigid chains, and both atactic and isotactic chains, which are formed from heterodimericparticle monomer units. We demonstrate that the flexibility of the charged chains can be tuned from very rigid (rod-like) to semiflexible (as in the simplified polymer model of beads on a string) by changing the ionic strength. This method can, in principle, be used with any type of colloidal particle. Moreover, our systems can be matched in terms of refractive index and density, so that bulk measurements in real space are possible.