• Since its inception in the early 2000, the Virtual Observatory (VO), developed as a collaboration of many national and international projects, has become a major factor in the discovery and dissemination of astronomical information worldwide. The IVOA has been coordinating all these efforts worldwide to ensure a common VO framework that enables transparent access to and interoperability of astronomy resources (data and software) around the world. The VO is not a magic solution to all astronomy data management challenges but it does bring useful solutions in many areas borne out by the fact that VO interfaces are broadly found in astronomy major data centres and projects worldwide. Astronomy data centres have been building VO services on top of their existing data services to increase interoperability with other VO-compliant data resources to take advantage of the continuous and increasing development of VO applications. VO applications have made multi-instrument and multi-wavelength science, a difficult and fruitful part of astronomy, somewhat easier. More recently, several major new astronomy projects have been directly adopting VO standards to build their data management infrastructure, giving birth to VO built-in archives. Embracing the VO framework from the beginning brings the double gain of not needing to reinvent the wheel and ensuring from the start interoperability with other astronomy VO resources. Some of the IVOA standards are also starting to be used by neighbour disciplines like planetary sciences. There is still quite a lot to be done on the VO, in particular tackling the upcoming big data challenge and how to find interoperable solutions to the new data analysis paradigm of bringing and running the software close to the data.
  • We provide an overview of the science benefits of combining information from the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). We first summarise the capabilities and timeline of the LSST and overview its science goals. We then discuss the science questions in common between the two projects, and how they can be best addressed by combining the data from both telescopes. We describe how weak gravitational lensing and galaxy clustering studies with LSST and SKA can provide improved constraints on the causes of the cosmological acceleration. We summarise the benefits to galaxy evolution studies of combining deep optical multi-band imaging with radio observations. Finally, we discuss the excellent match between one of the most unique features of the LSST, its temporal cadence in the optical waveband, and the time resolution of the SKA.
  • We investigate the effects on cosmological clustering statistics of empirical biasing, where the galaxy distribution is a local transformation of the present-day Eulerian density field. The effects of the suppression of galaxy numbers in voids, and their enhancement in regions of high density, are considered, independently and in combination. We compare results from numerical simulations with the predictions of simple analytic models. We find that the bias is generally scale-dependent, so that the shape of the galaxy power spectrum differs from that of the underlying mass distribution. The degree of bias is always a monotonic function of scale, tending to an asymptotic value on scales where the density fluctuations are linear. The scale dependence is often rather weak, with many reasonable prescriptions giving a bias which is nearly independent of scale. We have investigated whether such an Eulerian bias can reconcile a range of theoretical power spectra with the twin requirements of fitting the galaxy power spectrum and reproducing the observed mass-to-light ratios in clusters. It is not possible to satisfy these constraints for any member of the family of CDM-like power spectra in an Einstein - de Sitter universe when normalised to match COBE on large scales and galaxy cluster abundances on intermediate scales. We discuss what modifications of the mass power spectrum might produce agreement with the observational data.
  • We use a series of statistical techniques to compare the clustering of samples of IRAS galaxies selected on the basis of their far-infrared emission temperature, to see whether a temperature-dependent effect, such as might be produced by interaction-induced star formation, could be responsible for the increase in clustering strength with redshift in the QDOT redshift survey that has been reported by several authors. The temperature-luminosity relation for IRAS galaxies means that warm and cool samples drawn from a flux-limited sample like QDOT will sample quite different volumes of space. To overcome this problem, and to distinguish truly temperature-dependent results from those depending directly on the volume of space sampled, we consider a pair of samples of warmer and cooler galaxies with matched redshift distributions, as well as pairs of samples selected using a simple temperature cut. ...(abstract shortened).... We conclude that that there may be a temperature-dependent component to the observed increase in the clustering strength of QDOT galaxies with redshift, but that it is less important than a sampling effect, which reflects the local cosmography, rather than the physical properties of the galaxies and their environment. We discuss the implications of this work for the use of IRAS galaxies as probes of large-scale structure and for models accounting for their far-infrared emission by interaction-induced star formation.