• We use the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope to study the rich population of young massive star clusters in the main body of NGC 3256, a merging pair of galaxies with a high star formation rate (SFR) and SFR per unit area ($\Sigma_{\rm{SFR}}$). These clusters have luminosity and mass functions that follow power laws, $dN/dL \propto L^{\alpha}$ with $\alpha = -2.23 \pm 0.07$, and $dN/dM \propto M^{\beta}$ with $\beta = -1.86 \pm 0.34$ for $\tau < 10$ Myr clusters, similar to those found in more quiescent galaxies. The age distribution can be described by $dN/d\tau \propto \tau ^ \gamma$, with $\gamma \approx -0.67 \pm 0.08$ for clusters younger than about a few hundred million years, with no obvious dependence on cluster mass. This is consistent with a picture where $\sim 80 \%$ of the clusters are disrupted each decade in time. We investigate the claim that galaxies with high $\Sigma_{\rm{SFR}}$ form clusters more efficiently than quiescent systems by determining the fraction of stars in bound clusters ($\Gamma$) and the CMF/SFR statistic (CMF is the cluster mass function) for NGC 3256 and comparing the results with those for other galaxies. We find that the CMF/SFR statistic for NGC 3256 agrees well with that found for galaxies with $\Sigma_{\rm{SFR}}$ and SFRs that are lower by $1-3$ orders of magnitude, but that estimates for $\Gamma$ are only robust when the same sets of assumptions are applied. Currently, $\Gamma$ values available in the literature have used different sets of assumptions, making it more difficult to compare the results between galaxies.
  • The Hubble Source Catalog is designed to help optimize science from the Hubble Space Telescope by combining the tens of thousands of visit-based source lists in the Hubble Legacy Archive into a single master catalog. Version 1 of the Hubble Source Catalog includes WFPC2, ACS/WFC, WFC3/UVIS, and WFC3/IR photometric data generated using SExtractor software to produce the individual source lists. The catalog includes roughly 80 million detections of 30 million objects involving 112 different detector/filter combinations, and about 160 thousand HST exposures. Source lists from Data Release 8 of the Hubble Legacy Archive are matched using an algorithm developed by Budavari & Lubow (2012). The mean photometric accuracy for the catalog as a whole is better than 0.10 mag, with relative accuracy as good as 0.02 mag in certain circumstances (e.g., bright isolated stars). The relative astrometric residuals are typically within 10 mas, with a value for the mode (i.e., most common value) of 2.3 mas. The absolute astrometric accuracy is better than $\sim$0.1 arcsec for most sources, but can be much larger for a fraction of fields that could not be matched to the PanSTARRS, SDSS, or 2MASS reference systems. In this paper we describe the database design with emphasis on those aspects that enable the users to fully exploit the catalog while avoiding common misunderstandings and potential pitfalls. We provide usage examples to illustrate some of the science capabilities and data quality characteristics, and briefly discuss plans for future improvements to the Hubble Source Catalog.
  • We present new deep photometry of the globular cluster system (GCS) around NGC 6166, the central supergiant galaxy in Abell 2199. HST data from the ACS and WFC3 cameras in F475W, F814W are used to determine the spatial distribution of the GCS, its metallicity distribution function (MDF), and the dependence of the MDF on galactocentric radius and on GC luminosity. The MDF is extremely broad, with the classic red and blue subpopulations heavily overlapped, but a double-Gaussian model can still formally match the MDF closely. The spatial distribution follows a Sersic-like profile detectably to a projected radius of at least $R_{gc} = 250$ kpc. To that radius, the total number of clusters in the system is N_{GC} = 39000 +- 2000, the global specific frequency is S_N = 11.2 +- 0.6, and 57\% of the total are blue, metal-poor clusters. The GCS may fade smoothly into the Intra-Cluster Medium of A2199; we see no clear transition from the core of the galaxy to the cD halo or the ICM. The radial distribution, projected ellipticity, and mean metallicity of the red (metal-richer) clusters match the halo light extremely well for R > 15 kpc, both of them varying as \sigma_{MRGC} ~ \sigma_{light} ~ R^-1.8. By comparison, the blue (metal-poor) GC component has a much shallower falloff \sigma_{MPGC} ~ R^-1.0 and a more nearly spherical distribution. This strong difference in their density distributions produces a net metallicity gradient in the GCS as a whole that is primarily generated by the population gradient. With NGC 6166 we appear to be penetrating into a regime of high enough galaxy mass and rich enough environment that the bimodal two-phase description of GC formation is no longer as clear or effective as it has been in smaller galaxies.
  • We investigate a novel Bayesian analysis method, based on the Stochastically Lighting Up Galaxies (slug) code, to derive the masses, ages, and extinctions of star clusters from integrated light photometry. Unlike many analysis methods, slug correctly accounts for incomplete IMF sampling, and returns full posterior probability distributions rather than simply probability maxima. We apply our technique to 621 visually-confirmed clusters in two nearby galaxies, NGC 628 and NGC 7793, that are part of the Legacy Extragalactic UV Survey (LEGUS). LEGUS provides Hubble Space Telescope photometry in the NUV, U, B, V, and I bands. We analyze the sensitivity of the derived cluster properties to choices of prior probability distribution, evolutionary tracks, IMF, metallicity, treatment of nebular emission, and extinction curve. We find that slug's results for individual clusters are insensitive to most of these choices, but that the posterior probability distributions we derive are often quite broad, and sometimes multi-peaked and quite sensitive to the choice of priors. In contrast, the properties of the cluster population as a whole are relatively robust against all of these choices. We also compare our results from slug to those derived with a conventional non-stochastic fitting code, Yggdrasil. We show that slug's stochastic models are generally a better fit to the observations than the deterministic ones used by Yggdrasil. However, the overall properties of the cluster populations recovered by both codes are qualitatively similar.
  • We present a new photometric catalog of 326 candidate globular clusters (GCs) in the nearby spiral galaxy M101, selected from B, V, and I Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys images. The luminosity function (LF) of these clusters has an unusually large number of faint sources compared with GCLFs in many other spiral galaxies. Accordingly, we separate and compare the properties of "bright" (M_V < -6.5) versus "faint" (M_V > -6.5; one magnitude fainter than the expected GC peak) clusters within our sample. The LF of the bright clusters is well fit by a peaked distribution similar to those observed in the Milky Way (MW) and other galaxies. These bright clusters also have similar size (r_{eff}) and spatial distributions as MW GCs. The LF of the faint clusters, on the other hand, is well described by a power law, dN(L_V)/dL_V proportional to L_V^alpha with alpha = -2.6 plus or minus 0.3, similar to those observed for young and intermediate-age cluster systems in star forming galaxies. We find that the faint clusters have larger typical r_{eff} than the bright clusters, and have a flatter surface density profile, being more evenly distributed, as we would expect for clusters associated with the disk. We use the shape of the LF and predictions for mass-loss driven by two-body relaxation to constrain the ages of the faint clusters. Our results are consistent with two populations of old star clusters in M101: a bright population of halo clusters and a fainter, possibly younger, population of old disk clusters.
  • As part of a spectroscopic survey of supernova remnant candidates in M83 using the Gemini-South telescope and GMOS, we have discovered one object whose spectrum shows very broad lines at H$\alpha$, [O~I] 6300,6363, and [O~III] 4959,5007, similar to those from other objects classified as `late time supernovae.' Although six historical supernovae have been observed in M83 since 1923, none were seen at the location of this object. Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 images show a nearly unresolved emission source, while Chandra and ATCA data reveal a bright X-ray source and nonthermal radio source at the position. Objects in other galaxies showing similar spectra are only decades post-supernova, which raises the possibility that the supernova that created this object occurred during the last century but was missed. Using photometry of nearby stars from the HST data, we suggest the precursor was at least 17 $\rm M_{sun}$, and the presence of broad H$\alpha$ in the spectrum makes a type II supernova likely. The supernova must predate the 1983 VLA radio detection of the object. We suggest examination of archival images of M83 to search for evidence of the supernova event that gave rise to this object, and thus provide a precise age.
  • We present the first results from our HST Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) survey of seven central supergiant cluster galaxies and their globular cluster (GC) systems. We measure a total of 48000 GCs in all seven galaxies, representing the largest single GC database. We find that a log-normal shape accurately matches the observed luminosity function (LF) of the GCs down to the GCLF turnover point, which is near our photometric limit. In addition, the LF has a virtually identical shape in all seven galaxies. Our data underscore the similarity in the formation mechanism of massive star clusters in diverse galactic environments. At the highest luminosities (log L > 10^7 L_Sun) we find small numbers of "superluminous" objects in five of the galaxies; their luminosity and color ranges are at least partly consistent with those of UCDs (Ultra-Compact Dwarfs). Lastly, we find preliminary evidence that in the outer halo (R > 20 kpc), the LF turnover point shows a weak dependence on projected distance, scaling as L_0 ~ R^-0.2, while the LF dispersion remains nearly constant.
  • We present the highest spatial resolution (~0.5") CO (3-2) observations to date of the "overlap" region in the merging Antennae galaxies (NGC 4038/39), taken with the ALMA. We report on the discovery of a long (3 kpc), thin (aspect ratio 30/1), filament of CO gas which breaks up into roughly ten individual knots. Each individual knot has a low internal velocity dispersion (~10 km/s), and the dispersion of the ensemble of knots in the filament is also low (~10 km/s). At the other extreme, we find that the individual clouds in the Super Giant Molecular Cloud 2 region discussed by Wilson and collaborators have a large range of internal velocity dispersions (10 to 80 km/s), and a large dispersion amongst the ensemble (~80 km/s). We use a combination of optical and near-IR data from HST, radio continuum observations taken with the VLA, and CO data from ALMA to develop an evolutionary classification system which provides a framework for studying the sequence of star cluster formation and evolution, from diffuse SGMCs, to proto, embedded, emerging, young, and intermediate/old clusters. The relative timescales have been assessed by determining the fractional population of sources at each evolutionary stage. Using the evolutionary framework, we estimate the maximum age range of clusters in a single SGMC is ~10 Myr, which suggests that the molecular gas is removed over this timescale resulting in the cessation of star formation and the destruction of the GMC within a radius of about 200 pc. (abridged)
  • We present an optical/NIR imaging survey of the face-on spiral galaxy M83, using data from the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). Seven fields are used to cover a large fraction of the inner disk, with observations in nine broadband and narrowband filters. In conjunction with a deep Chandra survey and other new radio and optical ground-based work, these data enable a broad range of science projects to be pursued. We provide an overview of the WFC3 data and processing and then delve into one topic, the population of young supernova remnants. We used a search method targeted toward soft X-ray sources to identify 26 new supernova remnants. Many compact emission nebulae detected in [Fe II] 1.644 micron align with known remnants and this diagnostic has also been used to identify many new remnants, some of which are hard to find with optical images. We include 37 previously identified supernova remnants that the data reveal to be <0.5'' in angular size and thus are difficult to characterize from ground-based data. The emission line ratios seen in most of these objects are consistent with shocks in dense interstellar material rather than showing evidence of ejecta. We suggest that the overall high elemental abundances in combination with high interstellar medium pressures in M83 are responsible for this result. Future papers will expand on different aspects of the these data including a more comprehensive analysis of the overall supernova remnant population.
  • Luminosity functions have been determined for star cluster populations in 20 nearby (4-30 Mpc), star-forming galaxies based on ACS source lists generated by the Hubble Legacy Archive. Comparisons are made with other recently generated cluster catalogs demonstrating that the HLA-generated catalogs are of similar quality, but in general do not go as deep. A typical cluster luminosity function can be approximated by a power-law, $dN/dL\propto L^{\alpha}$, with an average value for $\alpha$ of $-2.37$ and RMS scatter = 0.18 when using the F814W ("$I$") band. We find that galaxies with high rates of star formation (or equivalently, with the brightest or largest numbers of clusters) have a slight tendency to have shallower values of $\alpha$. In particular, the Antennae galaxy (NGC4038/39), a merging system with a relatively high star formation rate, has the second flattest luminosity function in the sample. A tentative correlation may also be present between Hubble Type and values of $\alpha$, in the sense that later type galaxies (i.e., Sd and Sm) appear to have flatter luminosity functions. Hence, while there do appear to be some weak correlations, the relative similarity in the values of $\alpha$ for a large number of star-forming galaxies suggests that, to first order, the LFs are fairly universal. We examine the bright end of the luminosity functions and find evidence for a downturn, although it only pertains to about 1% of the clusters. Our uniform database results in a small scatter ($\approx$0.4 to 0.5 mag) in the correlation between the magnitude of the brightest cluster ($M_\mathrm{brightest}$) and log of the number of clusters brighter than $M_{I}=-9$ (log N). We also examine the magnitude of the brightest cluster vs. log SFR for a sample including both dwarfs galaxies and ULIRGS.
  • We compare the locations of 82 X-ray binaries (XRBs) detected in the merging Antennae galaxies by Zezas et al., based on observations taken with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, with a catalog of optically selected star clusters presented by Whitmore et al., based on observations taken with the Hubble Space Telescope. Within the 2 sigma positional uncertainty of 0.58", we find 22 XRBs are coincident with star clusters, where only 2-3 chance coincidences are expected. The ages of the clusters were estimated by comparing their UBVI, Halpha colors with predictions from stellar evolutionary models. We find that 14 of the 22 coincident XRBs (64%) are hosted by star clusters with ages of 6 Myr or less. Five of the XRBs are hosted by young clusters with ages 10-100 Myr, while three are hosted by intermediate age clusters with 100-300 Myr. Based on the results from recent N-body simulations, which suggest that black holes are far more likely to be retained within their parent clusters than neutron stars, we suggest that our sample consists primarily of black hole binaries with different ages.
  • SN1957D, located in one of the spiral arms of M83, is one of the small number of extragalactic supernovae that has remained detectable at radio and optical wavelengths during the decades after its explosion. Here we report the first detection of SN1957D in X-rays, as part of a 729 ks observation of M83 with \chandra. The X-ray luminosity (0.3 - 8 keV) is 1.7 (+2.4,-0.3) 10**37 ergs/s. The spectrum is hard and highly self-absorbed compared to most sources in M83 and to other young supernova remnants, suggesting that the system is dominated at X-ray wavelengths by an energetic pulsar and its pulsar wind nebula. The high column density may be due to absorption within the SN ejecta. HST WFC3 images resolve the supernova remnant from the surrounding emission and the local star field. Photometry of stars around SN1957D, using WFC3 images, indicates an age of less than 10**7 years and a main sequence turnoff mass more than 17 solar masses. New spectra obtained with Gemini-South show that the optical spectrum continues to be dominated by broad [O III] emission lines, the signature of fast-moving SN ejecta. The width of the broad lines has remained about 2700 km/s (FWHM). The [O III] flux dropped precipitously between 1989 and 1991, but continued monitoring shows the flux has been almost constant since. In contrast, radio observations over the period 1990-2011 show a decline rate inf the flux proportional to t**-4, far steeper than the rate observed earlier, suggesting that the primary shock has overrun the edge of a pre-SN wind.
  • We present a multi-wavelength photometric study of ~15,000 resolved stars in the nearby spiral galaxy M83 (NGC5236, D=4.61Mpc) based on Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 observations using four filters: F336W, F438W, F555W, and F814W. We select 50 regions (an average size of 260 pc by 280 pc) in the spiral arm and inter-arm areas of M83, and determine the age distribution of the luminous stellar populations in each region. This is accomplished by correcting for extinction towards each individual star by comparing its colors with predictions from stellar isochrones. We compare the resulting luminosity weighted mean ages of the luminous stars in the 50 regions with those determined from several independent methods, including the number ratio of red-to-blue supergiants, morphological appearance of the regions, surface brightness fluctuations, and the ages of clusters in the regions. We find reasonably good agreement between these methods. We also find that young stars are much more likely to be found in concentrated aggregates along spiral arms, while older stars are more dispersed. These results are consistent with the scenario that star formation is associated with the spiral arms, and stars form primarily in star clusters and then disperse on short timescales to form the field population. The locations of Wolf-Rayet stars are found to correlate with the positions of many of the youngest regions, providing additional support for our ability to accurately estimate ages. We address the effects of spatial resolution on the measured colors, magnitudes, and age estimates. While individual stars can occasionally show measurable differences in the colors and magnitudes, the age estimates for entire regions are only slightly affected.
  • A previously undetected X-ray source (L_X<10**36 erg/s) in the strongly star-forming galaxy M83 entered an ultraluminous state between August 2009 and December 2010. It was first seen with Chandra on 23 December 2010 at L_X ~ 4 10**39 ergs/s, and has remained ultraluminous through our most recent observations in December 2011, with typical flux variation of a factor of two. The spectrum is well fitted by a combination of absorbed power-law and disk black-body models. While the relative contributions of the models varies with time, we have seen no evidence for a canonical state transition. The luminosity and spectral properties are consistent with accretion powered by a black hole with M_BH ~ 40-100 solar masses. In July 2011 we found a luminous, blue optical counterpart which had not been seen in deep HST observations obtained in August 2009. These optical observations suggest that the donor star is a low-mass star undergoing Roche-lobe overflow, and that the blue optical emission seen during the outburst is coming from an irradiated accretion disk. This source shows that ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) with low-mass companions are an important component of the ULX population in star-forming galaxies, and provides further evidence that the blue optical counterparts of some ULXs need not indicate a young, high-mass companion, but rather that they may indicate X-ray reprocessing.
  • The majority of clusters in the Universe have masses well below 10^5 Msun. Hence their integrated fluxes and colors can be affected by the random presence of a few bright stars introduced by stochastic sampling of the stellar mass function. Specific methods are being developed to extend the analysis of cluster SEDs into the low-mass regime. In this paper, we apply such a method to observations of star clusters, in the nearby spiral galaxy M83. We reassess ages and masses of a sample of 1242 objects for which UBVIHalpha fluxes were obtained with the HST/WFC3 images. Synthetic clusters with known properties are used to characterize the limitations of the method. The ensemble of color predictions of the discrete cluster models are in good agreement with the distribution of observed colors. We emphasize the important role of the Halpha data in the assessment of the fraction of young objects, particularly in breaking the age-extinction degeneracy that hampers an analysis based on UBVI only. We find the mass distribution of the cluster sample to follow a power-law of index -2.1 +/-0.2, and the distribution of ages a power-law of index -1.0 +/-0.2 for M > 10^3.5 Msun and ages between 10^7 and 10^9 yr. An extension of our main method, that makes full use of the probability distributions of age and mass of the individual clusters, is explored. It produces similar power-law slopes and will deserve further investigation. Although the properties derived for individual clusters significantly differ from those obtained with traditional, non-stochastic models in ~30% of the objects, the first order aspect of the age and mass distributions are similar to those obtained previously for this M83 sample in the range of overlap of the studies. We extend the power-law description to lower masses with better mass and age resolution and without most of the artifacts produced by the classical method.
  • We present recent Hubble Space Telescope observations of the inner filament of Centaurus A, using the new Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) $F225W, F657N$ and $F814W$ filters. We find a young stellar population near the south-west tip of the filament. Combining the WFC3 dataset with archival Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) $F606W$ observations, we are able to constrain the ages of these stars to <=10 Myrs, with best-fit ages of 1-4 Myrs. No further recent star-formation is found along the filament. Based on the location and age of this stellar population, and the fact that there is no radio lobe or jet activity near the star-formation, we propose an updated explanation for the origin of the inner filament. Sutherland et al. (1993) suggested that radio jet-induced shocks can drive the observed optical line emission. We argue that such shocks can naturally arise due to a weak cocoon-driven bow shock (rather than from the radio jet directly), propagating through the diffuse interstellar medium from a location near the inner northern radio lobe. The shock can overrun a molecular cloud, triggering star-formation in the dense molecular cores. Ablation and shock heating of the diffuse gas then gives rise to the observed optical line and X-ray emission. Deeper X-ray observations should show more diffuse emission along the filament.
  • We combine near-ultraviolet (NUV; 2250 {\AA}) and optical (U, B, V, I) imaging from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), to study the globular cluster (GC) population in NGC 4150, a sub-L* (M_B ~ -18.48 mag) early-type minor-merger remnant in the Coma I cloud. We use broadband NUV-optical photometry from the WFC3 to estimate individual ages, metallicities, masses and line-of-sight extinctions [E_(B-V)] for 63 bright (M_V < -5 mag) GCs in this galaxy. In addition to a small GC population with ages greater than 10 Gyr, we find a dominant population of clusters with ages centred around 6 Gyr, consistent with the expected peak of stellar mass assembly in faint early-types residing in low-density environments. The old and intermediate-age GCs in NGC 4150 are metal-poor, with metallicities less than 0.1 ZSun, and reside in regions of low extinction (E_(B-V) < 0.05 mag). We also find a population of young, metal-rich (Z > 0.3 ZSun) clusters that have formed within the last Gyr and reside in relatively dusty (E_(B-V) > 0.3 mag) regions that are coincident with the part of the galaxy core that hosts significant recent star formation. Cluster disruption models (in which ~80-90% of objects younger than a few 10^8 yr dissolve every dex in time) suggest that the bulk of these young clusters are a transient population.
  • Using observations obtained with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we have studied the properties of the stellar populations in the central regions of 30 Dor, in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The observations clearly reveal the presence of considerable differential extinction across the field. We characterise and quantify this effect using young massive main sequence stars to derive a statistical reddening correction for most objects in the field. We then search for pre-main sequence (PMS) stars by looking for objects with a strong (> 4 sigma) Halpha excess emission and find about 1150 of them over the entire field. Comparison of their location in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram with theoretical PMS evolutionary tracks for the appropriate metallicity reveals that about one third of these objects are younger than ~4Myr, compatible with the age of the massive stars in the central ionising cluster R136, whereas the rest have ages up to ~30Myr, with a median age of ~12Myr. This indicates that star formation has proceeded over an extended period of time, although we cannot discriminate between an extended episode and a series of short and frequent bursts that are not resolved in time. While the younger PMS population preferentially occupies the central regions of the cluster, older PMS objects are more uniformly distributed across the field and are remarkably few at the very centre of the cluster. We attribute this latter effect to photoevaporation of the older circumstellar discs caused by the massive ionising members of R136.
  • We use new WFC3 observations of the nearby grand design spiral galaxy M83 to develop two independent methods for estimating the ages of young star clusters. The first method uses the physical extent and morphology of Halpha emission to estimate the ages of clusters younger than tau ~10 Myr. It is based on the simple premise that the gas in very young (tau < few Myr) clusters is largely coincident with the cluster stars, is in a small, ring-like structure surrounding the stars in slightly older clusters (e.g., tau ~5 Myr), and is in a larger ring-like bubble for still older clusters (i.e., ~5-10 Myr). The second method is based on an observed relation between pixel-to-pixel flux variations within clusters and their ages. This method relies on the fact that the brightest individual stars in a cluster are most prominent at ages around 10 Myr, and fall below the detection limit (i.e., M_V < -3.5) for ages older than about 100 Myr. These two methods are the basis for a new morphological classification system which can be used to estimate the ages of star clusters based on their appearance. We compare previous age estimates of clusters in M83 determined from fitting UBVI Halpha measurements using predictions from stellar evolutionary models with our new morphological categories and find good agreement at the ~95% level. The scatter within categories is ~0.1 dex in log tau for young clusters (<10 Myr) and ~0.5 dex for older (>10 Myr) clusters. A by-product of this study is the identification of 22 "single-star" HII regions in M83, with central stars having ages ~4 Myr.
  • We investigate the ionization structure of the nebular gas in M83 using the line diagnostic diagram, [O III](5007 \degA)/H{\beta} vs. [S II](6716 \deg A+6731 \deg A)/H{\alpha} with the newly available narrowband images from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We produce the diagnostic diagram on a pixel-by-pixel (0.2" x 0.2") basis and compare it with several photo- and shock-ionization models. For the photo-ionized gas, we observe a gradual increase of the log([O III]/H{\beta}) ratios from the center to the spiral arm, consistent with the metallicity gradient, as the H II regions go from super solar abundance to roughly solar abundance from the center out. Using the diagnostic diagram, we separate the photo-ionized from the shock-ionized component of the gas. We find that the shock-ionized H{\alpha} emission ranges from ~2% to about 15-33% of the total, depending on the separation criteria used. An interesting feature in the diagnostic diagram is an horizontal distribution around log([O III]/H{\beta}) ~ 0. This feature is well fit by a shock-ionization model with 2.0 Z\odot metallicity and shock velocities in the range of 250 km/s to 350 km/s. A low velocity shock component, < 200 km/s, is also detected, and is spatially located at the boundary between the outer ring and the spiral arm. The low velocity shock component can be due to : 1) supernova remnants located nearby, 2) dynamical interaction between the outer ring and the spiral arm, 3) abnormal line ratios from extreme local dust extinction. The current data do not enable us to distinguish among those three possible interpretations. Our main conclusion is that, even at the HST resolution, the shocked gas represents a small fraction of the total ionized gas emission at less than 33% of the total. However, it accounts for virtually all of the mechanical energy produced by the central starburst in M83.
  • We present a multi-wavelength photometric study of individual stars in M83 based on observations taken as part of the WFC3 Early Release Science (ERS) program. The central region of M83 has been imaged in seven broad-band filters to obtain multi-wavelength coverage from the near-UV to near-IR. We use four filters- F336W, F438W, F555W, and F814W-to measure the UBVI photometric colors and intrinsic luminosity for ~10,000 stars. These measurements are used to determine the recent (< 1 Gyr) star formation history of M83. We selected 50 regions in the spiral arm and the inter-arm area of M83 and categorize them based on their H? morphology. To determine ages of stars in each region, the color-magnitude diagrams (CMD) and the color-color diagrams were used with the Padova isochrones with a metallicity of Z=0.03 (1.5 Z{\odot}). We correct the foreground and internal extinction of individual stars using the reddening-free Q parameter and improve our age estimates of stars from the isochrone fitting on the CMDs. Comparisons of stellar ages and cluster ages based on both their H? morphology and their spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting were made and show fairly good correlations. We also find that the regions with ages determined younger than 10 Myr are located preferentially along the active star-forming regions on the spiral arm.
  • We use near-infrared data obtained with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope to identify objects having the colors of brown dwarfs (BDs) in the field of the massive galactic cluster NGC 3603. These are identified through use of a combination of narrow and medium band filters spanning the J and H bands, and which are particularly sensitive to the presence of the 1.3-1.5{\mu}m H2O molecular band - unique to BDs. We provide a calibration of the relationship between effective temperature and color for both field stars and for BDs. This photometric method provides effective temperatures for BDs to an accuracy of {\pm}350K relative to spectroscopic techniques. This accuracy is shown to be not significantly affected by either stellar surface gravity or uncertainties in the interstellar extinction. We identify nine objects having effective temperature between 1700 and 2200 K, typical of BDs, observed J-band magnitudes in the range 19.5-21.5, and that are strongly clustered towards the luminous core of NGC 3603. However, if these are located at the distance of the cluster, they are far too luminous to be normal BDs. We argue that it is unlikely that these objects are either artifacts of our dataset, normal field BDs/M-type giants or extra-galactic contaminants and, therefore, might represent a new class of stars having the effective temperatures of BDs but with luminosities of more massive stars. We explore the interesting scenario in which these objects would be normal stars that have recently tidally ingested a Hot Jupiter, the remnants of which are providing a short-lived extended photosphere to the central star. In this case, we would expect them to show the signature of fast rotation.
  • We describe the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) Early Release Science (ERS) observations in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) South field. The new WFC3 ERS data provide calibrated, drizzled mosaics in the UV filters F225W, F275W, and F336W, as well as in the near-IR filters F098M (Ys), F125W (J), and F160W (H) with 1-2 HST orbits per filter. Together with the existing HST Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) GOODS-South mosaics in the BViz filters, these panchromatic 10-band ERS data cover 40-50 square arcmin at 0.2-1.7 {\mu}m in wavelength at 0.07-0.15" FWHM resolution and 0.090" Multidrizzled pixels to depths of AB\simeq 26.0-27.0 mag (5-{\sigma}) for point sources, and AB\simeq 25.5-26.5 mag for compact galaxies. In this paper, we describe: a) the scientific rationale, and the data taking plus reduction procedures of the panchromatic 10-band ERS mosaics; b) the procedure of generating object catalogs across the 10 different ERS filters, and the specific star-galaxy separation techniques used; and c) the reliability and completeness of the object catalogs from the WFC3 ERS mosaics. The excellent 0.07-0.15" FWHM resolution of HST/WFC3 and ACS makes star- galaxy separation straightforward over a factor of 10 in wavelength to AB\simeq 25-26 mag from the UV to the near-IR, respectively.
  • I am mainly interested in the formation and destruction of young star clusters in nearby star forming galaxies such as the Antennae, M83, and M51. One of the first analysis steps is to throw out all those pesky stars that keep contaminating my young cluster samples. Recently, spurred on by our new WFC3 Early Release Science data of galaxies including M83, NGC 4214, M82, NGC 2841, and Cen A, we began taking a closer look at the stellar component. Questions we are addressing are: 1) what are the most luminous stars, 2) how can we use them to help study the destruction of star clusters and the population of the field, 3) what fraction of stars, at least the bright stars, are formed in the field, in associations, and in compact clusters. In this contribution we describe some of the beginning steps in this process. More specifically, we describe how we separate stars from clusters in our galaxies, and describe how candidate Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) and "Single Star" HII (SSHII) regions have been identified.
  • (Abridged) We present a spatially-resolved near-UV/optical study of NGC 4150, using the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on board the Hubble Space Telescope. Previous studies of this early-type galaxy (ETG) indicate that it has a large reservoir of molecular gas, exhibits a kinematically decoupled core (likely indication of recent merging) and strong, central H_B absorption (indicative of young stars). The core of NGC 4150 shows ubiquitous near-UV emission and remarkable dusty substructure. Our analysis shows this galaxy to lie in the near-UV green valley, and its pixel-by-pixel photometry exhibits a narrow range of near-UV/optical colours that are similar to those of nearby E+A (post-starburst) galaxies. We parametrise the properties of the recent star formation (age, mass fraction, metallicity and internal dust content) in the NGC 4150 pixels by comparing the observed near-UV/optical photometry to stellar models. The typical age of the recent star formation (RSF) is around 0.9 Gyrs, consistent with the similarity of the near-UV colours to post-starburst systems, while the morphological structure of the young component supports the proposed merger scenario. The RSF metallicity, representative of the metallicity of the gas fuelling star formation, is around 0.3 - 0.5 Zsun. Assuming that this galaxy is a merger and that the gas is sourced mainly from the infalling companion, these metallicities plausibly indicate the gas-phase metallicity (GPM) of the accreted satellite. Comparison to the local mass-GPM relation suggests (crudely) that the mass of the accreted system is around 3x10^8 Msun, making NGC 4150 a 1:20 minor merger. A summation of the pixel RSF mass fractions indicates that the RSF contributes about 2-3 percent of the stellar mass. This work reaffirms our hypothesis that minor mergers play a significant role in the evolution of ETGs at late epochs.