• An essential step toward understanding neural circuits is linking their structure and their dynamics. In general, this relationship can be almost arbitrarily complex. Recent theoretical work has, however, begun to identify some broad principles underlying collective spiking activity in neural circuits. The first is that local features of network connectivity can be surprisingly effective in predicting global statistics of activity across a network. The second is that, for the important case of large networks with excitatory-inhibitory balance, correlated spiking persists or vanishes depending on the spatial scales of recurrent and feedforward connectivity. We close by showing how these ideas, together with plasticity rules, can help to close the loop between network structure and activity statistics.
  • The synaptic connectivity of cortex is plastic, with experience shaping the ongoing interactions between neurons. Theoretical studies of spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) have focused on either just pairs of neurons or large-scale simulations where analytic insight is lacking. A simple account for how fast spike time correlations affect both micro- and macroscopic network structure remains lacking. We develop a low-dimensional mean field theory showing how STDP gives rise to strongly coupled assemblies of neurons with shared stimulus preferences, with the connectivity actively reinforced by spike train correlations during spontaneous dynamics. Furthermore, the stimulus coding by cell assemblies is actively maintained by these internally generated spiking correlations, suggesting a new role for noise correlations in neural coding. Assembly formation has often been associated with firing rate-based plasticity schemes; our theory provides an alternative and complementary framework, where temporal correlations and STDP form and actively maintain learned structure in cortical networks.
  • The synaptic connectivity of cortical networks features an overrepresentation of certain wiring motifs compared to simple random-network models. This structure is shaped, in part, by synaptic plasticity that promotes or suppresses connections between neurons depending on their spiking activity. Frequently, theoretical studies focus on how feedforward inputs drive plasticity to create this network structure. We study the complementary scenario of self-organized structure in a recurrent network, with spike timing-dependent plasticity driven by spontaneous dynamics. We develop a self-consistent theory that describes the evolution of network structure by combining fast spiking covariance with a fast-slow theory for synaptic weight dynamics. Through a finite-size expansion of network dynamics, we obtain a low-dimensional set of nonlinear differential equations for the evolution of two-synapse connectivity motifs. With this theory in hand, we explore how the form of the plasticity rule drives the evolution of microcircuits in cortical networks. When potentiation and depression are in approximate balance, synaptic dynamics depend on the frequency of weighted divergent, convergent, and chain motifs. For additive, Hebbian STDP, these motif interactions create instabilities in synaptic dynamics that either promote or suppress the initial network structure. Our work provides a consistent theoretical framework for studying how spiking activity in recurrent networks interacts with synaptic plasticity to determine network structure.
  • Networks of model neurons with balanced recurrent excitation and inhibition produce irregular and asynchronous spiking activity. We extend the analysis of balanced networks to include the known dependence of connection probability on the spatial separation between neurons. In the continuum limit we derive that stable, balanced firing rate solutions require that the spatial spread of external inputs be broader than that of recurrent excitation, which in turn must be broader than or equal to that of recurrent inhibition. For finite size networks we investigate the pattern forming dynamics arising when balanced conditions are not satisfied. The spatiotemporal dynamics of balanced networks offer new challenges in the statistical mechanics of complex systems.
  • A neural correlate of parametric working memory is a stimulus specific rise in neuron firing rate that persists long after the stimulus is removed. Network models with local excitation and broad inhibition support persistent neural activity, linking network architecture and parametric working memory. Cortical neurons receive noisy input fluctuations which causes persistent activity to diffusively wander about the network, degrading memory over time. We explore how cortical architecture that supports parametric working memory affects the diffusion of persistent neural activity. Studying both a spiking network and a simplified potential well model, we show that spatially heterogeneous excitatory coupling stabilizes a discrete number of persistent states, reducing the diffusion of persistent activity over the network. However, heterogeneous coupling also coarse-grains the stimulus representation space, limiting the capacity of parametric working memory. The storage errors due to coarse-graining and diffusion tradeoff so that information transfer between the initial and recalled stimulus is optimized at a fixed network heterogeneity. For sufficiently long delay times, the optimal number of attractors is less than the number of possible stimuli, suggesting that memory networks can under-represent stimulus space to optimize performance. Our results clearly demonstrate the effects of network architecture and stochastic fluctuations on parametric memory storage.
  • The magnitude of correlations between stimulus-driven responses of pairs of neurons can itself be stimulus-dependent. We examine how this dependence impacts the information carried by neural populations about the stimuli that drive them. Stimulus-dependent changes in correlations can both carry information directly and modulate the information separately carried by the firing rates and variances. We use Fisher information to quantify these effects and show that, although stimulus dependent correlations often carry little information directly, their modulatory effects on the overall information can be large. In particular, if the stimulus-dependence is such that correlations increase with stimulus-induced firing rates, this can significantly enhance the information of the population when the structure of correlations is determined solely by the stimulus. However, in the presence of additional strong spatial decay of correlations, such stimulus-dependence may have a negative impact. Opposite relationships hold when correlations decrease with firing rates.
  • One of the fundamental characteristics of a nonlinear system is how it transfers correlations in its inputs to correlations in its outputs. This is particularly important in the nervous system, where correlations between spiking neurons are prominent. Using linear response and asymptotic methods for pairs of unconnected integrate-and-fire (IF) neurons receiving white noise inputs, we show that this correlation transfer depends on the output spike firing rate in a strong, stereotyped manner, and is, surprisingly, almost independent of the interspike variance. For cells receiving heterogeneous inputs, we further show that correlation increases with the geometric mean spiking rate in the same stereotyped manner, greatly extending the generality of this relationship. We present an immediate consequence of this relationship for population coding via tuning curves.