• A locally irregular graph is a graph whose adjacent vertices have distinct degrees, a regular graph is a graph where each vertex has the same degree and a locally regular graph is a graph where for every two adjacent vertices u, v, their degrees are equal. In this work, we study the set of all problems which are related to decomposition of graphs into regular, locally regular and/or locally irregular subgraphs and we present some polynomial time algorithms, NP-completeness results, lower bounds and upper bounds for them. Among our results, one of our lower bounds makes use of mutually orthogonal Latin squares which is relatively novel.
  • In this paper we introduce a natural mathematical structure derived from Samuel Beckett's play "Quad". We call this structure a binary Beckett-Gray code. We enumerate all codes for $n \leq 6$ and give examples for $n=7,8$. Beckett-Gray codes can be realized as successive states of a queue data structure. We show that the binary reflected Gray code can be realized as successive states of two stack data structures.
  • The de Bruijn torus (or grid) problem looks to find an $n$-by-$m$ binary matrix in which every possible $j$-by-$k$ submatrix appears exactly once. The existence and construction of these binary matrices was determined in the 70's, with generalizations to $d$-ary matrices in the 80's and 90's. However, these constructions lacked efficient decoding methods, leading to new constructions in the early 2000's. The new constructions develop cross-shaped patterns (rather than rectangular), and rely on a concept known as a half de Bruijn sequence. In this paper, we further advance this construction beyond cross-shape patterns. Furthermore, we show results for universal cycle grids, based off of the one-dimensional universal cycles introduced by Chung, Diaconis, and Graham, in the 90's. These grids have many applications such as robotic vision, location detection, and projective touch-screen displays.
  • A covering array $CA(N; t,k,v)$ is an $N \times k$ array $A$ whose each cell takes a value for a $v$-set $V$ called an alphabet. Moreover, the set $V^t$ is contained in the set of rows of every $N \times t$ subarray of $A$. The parameter $N$ is called the size of an array and $CAN(t,k,v)$ denotes the smallest $N$ for which a $CA(N; t,k,v)$ exists. It is well known that $CAN(t,k,v) = {\rm \Theta}(\log_2 k)$~\cite{godbole_bounds_1996}. In this paper we derive two upper bounds on $d(t,v)=\limsup_{k \rightarrow \infty} \frac{CAN(t,k,v)}{\log_2 k}$ using the algorithmic approach to the Lov\'{a}sz local lemma also known as entropy compression.
  • We consider the class of graphs for which the edge connectivity is equal to the maximum number of edge-disjoint spanning trees, and the natural generalization to matroids, where the cogirth is equal to the number of disjoint bases. We provide descriptions of such graphs and matroids, showing that such a graph (or matroid) has a unique decomposition. In the case of graphs, our results are relevant for certain communication protocols.
  • Karonski, Luczak, and Thomason (2004) conjectured that, for any connected graph G on at least three vertices, there exists an edge weighting from {1,2,3} such that adjacent vertices receive different sums of incident edge weights. Bartnicki, Grytczuk, and Niwcyk (2009) made a stronger conjecture, that each edge's weight may be chosen from an arbitrary list of size 3 rather than {1,2,3}. We examine a variation of these conjectures, where each vertex is coloured with a sequence of edge weights. Such a colouring relies on an ordering of the graph's edges, and so two variations arise -- one where we may choose any ordering of the edges and one where the ordering is fixed. In the former case, we bound the list size required for any graph. In the latter, we obtain a bound on list sizes for graphs with sufficiently large minimum degree. We also extend our methods to a list variation of irregularity strength, where each vertex receives a distinct sequence of edge weights.
  • We provide a structural description of, and invariants for, maximum spanning tree-packable graphs, i.e. those graphs G for which the edge connectivity of G is equal to the maximum number of edge-disjoint spanning trees in G. These graphs are of interest for the k-tree protocol of Itai and Rodeh [Inform. and Comput. 79 (1988), 43-59].
  • We propose a network protocol similar to the $k$-tree protocol of Itai and Rodeh [{\em Inform.\ and Comput.}\ {\bf 79} (1988), 43--59]. To do this, we define an {\em $t$-uncovering-by-bases} for a connected graph $G$ to be a collection $\mathcal{U}$ of spanning trees for $G$ such that any $t$-subset of edges of $G$ is disjoint from at least one tree in $\mathcal{U}$, where $t$ is some integer strictly less than the edge connectivity of $G$. We construct examples of these for some infinite families of graphs. Many of these infinite families utilise factorisations or decompositions of graphs. In every case the size of the uncovering-by-bases is no larger than the number of edges in the graph and we conjecture that this may be true in general.