• We define the beta-function of a perturbative quantum field theory in the mathematical framework introduced by Costello -- combining perturbative renormalization and the BV formalism -- as the cohomology class of a certain element in the obstruction-deformation complex. We show that the one-loop beta-function is a well-defined element of the local deformation complex for translation-invariant and classically scale-invariant theories, and furthermore that it is locally constant as a function on the space of classical interactions and computable as a rescaling anomaly, or as the logarithmic one-loop counterterm. We compute the one-loop beta-function in first-order Yang--Mills theory, recovering the famous asymptotic freedom for Yang--Mills in a mathematical context.
  • Hitomi Collaboration, Felix Aharonian, Hiroki Akamatsu, Fumie Akimoto, Steven W. Allen, Naohisa Anabuki, Lorella Angelini, Keith Arnaud, Marc Audard, Hisamitsu Awaki, Magnus Axelsson, Aya Bamba, Marshall Bautz, Roger Blandford, Laura Brenneman, Gregory V. Brown, Esra Bulbul, Edward Cackett, Maria Chernyakova, Meng Chiao, Paolo Coppi, Elisa Costantini, Jelle de Plaa, Jan-Willem den Herder, Chris Done, Tadayasu Dotani, Ken Ebisawa, Megan Eckart, Teruaki Enoto, Yuichiro Ezoe, Andrew Fabian, Carlo Ferrigno, Adam Foster, Ryuichi Fujimoto, Yasushi Fukazawa, Akihiro Furuzawa, Massimiliano Galeazzi, Luigi Gallo, Poshak Gandhi, Margherita Giustini, Andrea Goldwurm, Liyi Gu, Matteo Guainazzi, Yoshito Haba, Kouichi Hagino, Kenji Hamaguchi, Ilana Harrus, Isamu Hatsukade, Katsuhiro Hayashi, Takayuki Hayashi, Kiyoshi Hayashida, Junko Hiraga, Ann Hornschemeier, Akio Hoshino, John Hughes, Ryo Iizuka, Hajime Inoue, Yoshiyuki Inoue, Kazunori Ishibashi, Manabu Ishida, Kumi Ishikawa, Yoshitaka Ishisaki, Masayuki Itoh, Naoko Iyomoto, Jelle Kaastra, Timothy Kallman, Tuneyoshi Kamae, Erin Kara, Jun Kataoka, Satoru Katsuda, Junichiro Katsuta, Madoka Kawaharada, Nobuyuki Kawai, Richard Kelley, Dmitry Khangulyan, Caroline Kilbourne, Ashley King, Takao Kitaguchi, Shunji Kitamoto, Tetsu Kitayama, Takayoshi Kohmura, Motohide Kokubun, Shu Koyama, Katsuji Koyama, Peter Kretschmar, Hans Krimm, Aya Kubota, Hideyo Kunieda, Philippe Laurent, Francois Lebrun, Shiu-Hang Lee, Maurice Leutenegger, Olivier Limousin, Michael Loewenstein, Knox S. Long, David Lumb, Grzegorz Madejski, Yoshitomo Maeda, Daniel Maier, Kazuo Makishima, Maxim Markevitch, Hironori Matsumoto, Kyoko Matsushita, Dan McCammon, Brian McNamara, Missagh Mehdipour, Eric Miller, Jon Miller, Shin Mineshige, Kazuhisa Mitsuda, Ikuyuki Mitsuishi, Takuya Miyazawa, Tsunefumi Mizuno, Hideyuki Mori, Koji Mori, Harvey Moseley, Koji Mukai, Hiroshi Murakami, Toshio Murakami, Richard Mushotzky, Ryo Nagino, Takao Nakagawa, Hiroshi Nakajima, Takeshi Nakamori, Toshio Nakano, Shinya Nakashima, Kazuhiro Nakazawa, Masayoshi Nobukawa, Hirofumi Noda, Masaharu Nomachi, Steve O'Dell, Hirokazu Odaka, Takaya Ohashi, Masanori Ohno, Takashi Okajima, Naomi Ota, Masanobu Ozaki, Frits Paerels, Stephane Paltani, Arvind Parmar, Robert Petre, Ciro Pinto, Martin Pohl, F. Scott Porter, Katja Pottschmidt, Brian Ramsey, Christopher Reynolds, Helen Russell, Samar Safi-Harb, Shinya Saito, Kazuhiro Sakai, Hiroaki Sameshima, Goro Sato, Kosuke Sato, Rie Sato, Makoto Sawada, Norbert Schartel, Peter Serlemitsos, Hiromi Seta, Megumi Shidatsu, Aurora Simionescu, Randall Smith, Yang Soong, Lukasz Stawarz, Yasuharu Sugawara, Satoshi Sugita, Andrew Szymkowiak, Hiroyasu Tajima, Hiromitsu Takahashi, Tadayuki Takahashi, Shin'ichiro Takeda, Yoh Takei, Toru Tamagawa, Keisuke Tamura, Takayuki Tamura, Takaaki Tanaka, Yasuo Tanaka, Yasuyuki Tanaka, Makoto Tashiro, Yuzuru Tawara, Yukikatsu Terada, Yuichi Terashima, Francesco Tombesi, Hiroshi Tomida, Yohko Tsuboi, Masahiro Tsujimoto, Hiroshi Tsunemi, Takeshi Tsuru, Hiroyuki Uchida, Hideki Uchiyama, Yasunobu Uchiyama, Shutaro Ueda, Yoshihiro Ueda, Shiro Ueno, Shin'ichiro Uno, Meg Urry, Eugenio Ursino, Cor de Vries, Shin Watanabe, Norbert Werner, Daniel Wik, Dan Wilkins, Brian Williams, Shinya Yamada, Hiroya Yamaguchi, Kazutaka Yamaok, Noriko Y. Yamasaki, Makoto Yamauchi, Shigeo Yamauchi, Tahir Yaqoob, Yoichi Yatsu, Daisuke Yonetoku, Atsumasa Yoshida, Takayuki Yuasa, Irina Zhuravleva, Abderahmen Zoghbi
    Clusters of galaxies are the most massive gravitationally-bound objects in the Universe and are still forming. They are thus important probes of cosmological parameters and a host of astrophysical processes. Knowledge of the dynamics of the pervasive hot gas, which dominates in mass over stars in a cluster, is a crucial missing ingredient. It can enable new insights into mechanical energy injection by the central supermassive black hole and the use of hydrostatic equilibrium for the determination of cluster masses. X-rays from the core of the Perseus cluster are emitted by the 50 million K diffuse hot plasma filling its gravitational potential well. The Active Galactic Nucleus of the central galaxy NGC1275 is pumping jetted energy into the surrounding intracluster medium, creating buoyant bubbles filled with relativistic plasma. These likely induce motions in the intracluster medium and heat the inner gas preventing runaway radiative cooling; a process known as Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback. Here we report on Hitomi X-ray observations of the Perseus cluster core, which reveal a remarkably quiescent atmosphere where the gas has a line-of-sight velocity dispersion of 164+/-10 km/s in a region 30-60 kpc from the central nucleus. A gradient in the line-of-sight velocity of 150+/-70 km/s is found across the 60 kpc image of the cluster core. Turbulent pressure support in the gas is 4% or less of the thermodynamic pressure, with large scale shear at most doubling that estimate. We infer that total cluster masses determined from hydrostatic equilibrium in the central regions need little correction for turbulent pressure.
  • The problem of scheduling under resource constraints is widely applicable. One prominent example is power management, in which we have a limited continuous supply of power but must schedule a number of power-consuming tasks. Such problems feature tightly coupled continuous resource constraints and continuous temporal constraints. We address such problems by introducing the Time Resource Network (TRN), an encoding for resource-constrained scheduling problems. The definition allows temporal specifications using a general family of representations derived from the Simple Temporal network, including the Simple Temporal Network with Uncertainty, and the probabilistic Simple Temporal Network (Fang et al. (2014)). We propose two algorithms for determining the consistency of a TRN: one based on Mixed Integer Programing and the other one based on Constraint Programming, which we evaluate on scheduling problems with Simple Temporal Constraints and Probabilistic Temporal Constraints.
  • This is a discussion of the paper "Modeling an Augmented Lagrangian for Improved Blackbox Constrained Optimization," (Gramacy, R.~B., Gray, G.~A., Digabel, S.~L., Lee, H.~K.~H., Ranjan, P., Wells, G., and Wild, S.~M., Technometrics, 61, 1--38, 2015).
  • In a recent article Hontelez and colleagues investigate the prospects for elimination of HIV in South Africa through expanded access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) using STDSIM, a micro-simulation model. One of the first published models to suggest that expanded access to ART could lead to the elimination of HIV, referred to by the authors as the Granich Model, was developed and implemented by the present author. The notion that expanded access to ART could lead to the end of the AIDS epidemic gave rise to considerable interest and debate and remains contentious. In considering this notion Hontelez et al. start by stripping down STDSIM to a simple model that is equivalent to the model developed by the present author3 but is a stochastic event driven model. Hontelez and colleagues then reintroduce levels of complexity to explore ways in which the model structure affects the results. In contrast to our earlier conclusions Hontelez and colleagues conclude that universal voluntary counselling and testing with immediate ART at 90% coverage should result in the elimination of HIV but would take three times longer than predicted by the model developed by the present author. Hontelez et al. suggest that the current scale-up of ART at CD4 cell counts less than 350 cells/microL will lead to elimination of HIV in 30 years. I disagree with both claims and believe that their more complex models rely on unwarranted and unsubstantiated assumptions.
  • The prevalence of HIV in West Africa is lower than elsewhere in Africa but Gabon has one of the highest rates of HIV in that region. Gabon has a small population and a high per capita gross domestic product making it an ideal place to carry out a programme of early treatment for HIV. The effectiveness, availability and affordability of triple combination therapy make it possible to contemplate ending AIDS deaths and HIV transmission in the short term and HIV prevalence in the long term. Here we consider what would have happened in Gabon without the development of potent anti-retroviral therapy (ART), the impact that the current roll-out of ART has had on HIV, and what might be possible if early treatment with ART becomes available to all. We fit a dynamic transmission model to trends in the adult prevalence of HIV and infer trends in incidence, mortality and the impact of ART. The availability of ART has reduced the prevalence of HIV among adults not on ART from 4.2% to 2.9%, annual incidence from 0.43% to 0.27%, and the proportion of adults dying from AIDS illnesses each year from 0.36% to 0.13% saving the lives of 2.3 thousand people in 2013 alone. The provision of ART has been highly cost effective saving the country at least $18 million up to 2013.
  • This work presents Drake, a dynamic executive for temporal plans with choice. Dynamic plan execution strategies allow an autonomous agent to react quickly to unfolding events, improving the robustness of the agent. Prior work developed methods for dynamically dispatching Simple Temporal Networks, and further research enriched the expressiveness of the plans executives could handle, including discrete choices, which are the focus of this work. However, in some approaches to date, these additional choices induce significant storage or latency requirements to make flexible execution possible. Drake is designed to leverage the low latency made possible by a preprocessing step called compilation, while avoiding high memory costs through a compact representation. We leverage the concepts of labels and environments, taken from prior work in Assumption-based Truth Maintenance Systems (ATMS), to concisely record the implications of the discrete choices, exploiting the structure of the plan to avoid redundant reasoning or storage. Our labeling and maintenance scheme, called the Labeled Value Set Maintenance System, is distinguished by its focus on properties fundamental to temporal problems, and, more generally, weighted graph algorithms. In particular, the maintenance system focuses on maintaining a minimal representation of non-dominated constraints. We benchmark Drakes performance on random structured problems, and find that Drake reduces the size of the compiled representation by a factor of over 500 for large problems, while incurring only a modest increase in run-time latency, compared to prior work in compiled executives for temporal plans with discrete choices.
  • Destriping is a well-established technique for removing low-frequency correlated noise from Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) survey data. In this paper we present a destriping algorithm tailored to data from a polarimeter, i.e. an instrument where each channel independently measures the polarization of the input signal. We also describe a fully parallel implementation in Python released as Free Software and analyze its results and performance on simulated datasets, both the design case of signal and correlated noise, and with additional systematic effects. Finally we apply the algorithm to 30 days of 37.5 GHz polarized microwave data gathered from the B-Machine experiment, developed at UCSB. The B-Machine data and destriped maps are made publicly available. The purpose is the development of a scalable software tool to be applied to the upcoming 12 months of temperature and polarization data from LATTE (Low frequency All sky TemperaTure Experiment) at 8 GHz and to even larger datasets.
  • Many of the most exciting questions in astrophysics and cosmology, including the majority of observational probes of dark energy, rely on an understanding of the nonlinear regime of structure formation. In order to fully exploit the information available from this regime and to extract cosmological constraints, accurate theoretical predictions are needed. Currently such predictions can only be obtained from costly, precision numerical simulations. This paper is the third in a series aimed at constructing an accurate calibration of the nonlinear mass power spectrum on Mpc scales for a wide range of currently viable cosmological models, including dark energy. The first two papers addressed the numerical challenges, and the scheme by which an interpolator was built from a carefully chosen set of cosmological models. In this paper we introduce the "Coyote Univers"' simulation suite which comprises nearly 1,000 N-body simulations at different force and mass resolutions, spanning 38 wCDM cosmologies. This large simulation suite enables us to construct a prediction scheme, or emulator, for the nonlinear matter power spectrum accurate at the percent level out to k~1 h/Mpc. We describe the construction of the emulator, explain the tests performed to ensure its accuracy, and discuss how the central ideas may be extended to a wider range of cosmological models and applications. A power spectrum emulator code is released publicly as part of this paper.
  • The concentration of CD4 T-lymphocytes (CD4 count), in a person's plasma is widely used to decide when to start HIV-positive people on anti-retroviral therapy (ART) and to predict the impact of ART on the future course of HIV and tuberculosis (TB). However, CD4 cell-counts vary widely within and among populations and depend on many factors besides HIV-infection. The way in which CD4 counts decline over the course of HIV infection is neither well understood nor widely agreed. We review what is known about CD4 counts in relation to HIV and TB and discuss areas in which more research is needed to build a consensus on how to interpret and use CD4 counts in clinical practice and to develop a better understanding of the dynamics and control of HIV and HIV-related TB.
  • In 2005 there was an outbreak of XDR (extensively drug resistant) TB in Tugela Ferry, which is served by the Church of Scotland Hospital (COSH), in the uMzinyathi District, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. An investigation was carried out to determine if XDR TB was occurring elsewhere in the province, and to develop hypotheses for the rise in drug resistance with a view to developing a strategy for the control of MDR (multi-drug resistant) and XDR TB in the province and elsewhere. TB incidence and treatment success rates, for each of the 11 districts in the province, were obtained from the provincial electronic TB register for the years 2002-2007. The results of culture and drug sensitivity tests for the years 2002 to 2007 in each of the districts were compiled and culture taking practices were compared to the number of MDR TB cases. Interviews were conducted with key personnel in affected sites. In 2007, 2799, or 2.3% of 119,218 notified TB cases in the province were multi-drug resistant (MDR), and of these 270 (9.6%) were XDR. The two worst affected districts were uMzinyathi where 226 (4.1%) of 5522 notified TB cases were MDR, and of these 120 (53%) were extensively drug resistant (XDR), and uMkhanyakude where 337 (4.8%) of 6991 notified TB cases were MDR, but of these only four or (1.2%) were XDR. The worst affected medical centre was COSH where 164 or 9.8% of notified TB cases were MDR and of these 99 (60%) were XDR. Very high rates of XDR TB in the province are only found in uMzinyathi district even though MDR TB is common in most other districts. XDR may arisen at COSH because of the early and effective integration of the TB and HIV programmes in overcrowded and poorly ventilated facilities particular to COS.H To control XDR TB better management of both susceptible and resistant forms of TB is needed including treatment supervision, infection control and HIV management.
  • Characterization of the frequency response of coherent radiometric receivers is a key element in estimating the flux of astrophysical emissions, since the measured signal depends on the convolution of the source spectral emission with the instrument band shape. Laboratory Radio Frequency (RF) measurements of the instrument bandpass often require complex test setups and are subject to a number of systematic effects driven by thermal issues and impedance matching, particularly if cryogenic operation is involved. In this paper we present an approach to modeling radiometers bandpasses by integrating simulations and RF measurements of individual components. This method is based on QUCS (Quasi Universal Circuit Simulator), an open-source circuit simulator, which gives the flexibility of choosing among the available devices, implementing new analytical software models or using measured S-parameters. Therefore an independent estimate of the instrument bandpass is achieved using standard individual component measurements and validated analytical simulations. In order to automate the process of preparing input data, running simulations and exporting results we developed the Python package python-qucs and released it under GNU Public License. We discuss, as working cases, bandpass response modeling of the COFE and Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) radiometers and compare results obtained with QUCS and with a commercial circuit simulator software. The main purpose of bandpass modeling in COFE is to optimize component matching, while in LFI they represent the best estimation of frequency response, since end-to-end measurements were strongly affected by systematic effects.
  • The COsmic Foreground Explorer (COFE) is a balloon-borne microwave polarime- ter designed to measure the low-frequency and low-l characteristics of dominant diffuse polarized foregrounds. Short duration balloon flights from the Northern and Southern Hemispheres will allow the telescope to cover up to 80% of the sky with an expected sensitivity per pixel better than 100 $\mu K / deg^2$ from 10 GHz to 20 GHz. This is an important effort toward characterizing the polarized foregrounds for future CMB experiments, in particular the ones that aim to detect primordial gravity wave signatures in the CMB polarization angular power spectrum.
  • Several cosmological measurements have attained significant levels of maturity and accuracy over the last decade. Continuing this trend, future observations promise measurements of the statistics of the cosmic mass distribution at an accuracy level of one percent out to spatial scales with k~10 h/Mpc and even smaller, entering highly nonlinear regimes of gravitational instability. In order to interpret these observations and extract useful cosmological information from them, such as the equation of state of dark energy, very costly high precision, multi-physics simulations must be performed. We have recently implemented a new statistical framework with the aim of obtaining accurate parameter constraints from combining observations with a limited number of simulations. The key idea is the replacement of the full simulator by a fast emulator with controlled error bounds. In this paper, we provide a detailed description of the methodology and extend the framework to include joint analysis of cosmic microwave background and large scale structure measurements. Our framework is especially well-suited for upcoming large scale structure probes of dark energy such as baryon acoustic oscillations and, especially, weak lensing, where percent level accuracy on nonlinear scales is needed.
  • The Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope (BEAST) is a 2.2m off-axis telescope with an 8 element mixed Q (38-45GHz) and Ka (26-36GHz) band focal plane, designed for balloon borne and ground based studies of the Cosmic Microwave Background. Here we present the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) angular power spectrum calculated from 682 hours of data observed with the BEAST instrument. We use a binned pseudo-Cl estimator (the MASTER method). We find results that are consistent with other determinations of the CMB anisotropy for angular wavenumber l between 100 and 600. We also perform cosmological parameter estimation. The BEAST data alone produces a good constraint on Omega_k = 1-Omega_tot=-0.074 +/- 0.070, consistent with a flat Universe. A joint parameter estimation analysis with a number of previous CMB experiments produces results consistent with previous determinations.
  • We present the first sky maps from the BEAST (Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope) experiment. BEAST consists of a 2.2 meter off axis Gregorian telescope fed by a cryogenic millimeter wavelength focal plane currently consisting of 6 Q band (40 GHz) and 2 Ka band (30 GHz) scalar feed horns feeding cryogenic HEMT amplifiers. Data were collected from two balloon-borne flights in 2000, followed by a lengthy ground observing campaign from the 3.8 Km altitude University of California White Mountain Research Station. This paper reports the initial results from the ground based observations. The instrument produced an annular map covering the sky from declinateion 33 to 42 degrees. The maps cover an area of 2470 square degrees with an effective resolution of 23 arcminutes FWHM at 40 GHz and 30 arcminutes at 30 GHz. The map RMS (smoothed to 30 arcminutes and excluding galactic foregrounds) is 54 +-5 microK at 40 GHz. Comparison with the instrument noise gives a cosmic signal RMS contribution of 28 +-3 microK. An estimate of the actual CMB sky signal requires taking into account the l-space filter function of our experiment and analysis techniques, carried out in a companion paper (O'Dwyer et al. 2003). In addition to the robust detection of CMB anisotropies, we find a strong correlation between small portions of our maps and features in recent H$\alpha$ maps (Finkbeiner, 2003). In this work we describe the data set and analysis techniques leading to the maps, including data selection, filtering, pointing reconstruction, mapmaking algorithms and systematic effects. A detailed description of the experiment appears in Childers et al. (2003).