• We derive the electroweak (EW) collinear splitting functions for the Standard Model, including the massive fermions, gauge bosons and the Higgs boson. We first present the splitting functions in the limit of unbroken SU(2)xU(1) and discuss their general features in the collinear and soft-collinear regimes. We then systematically incorporate EW symmetry breaking (EWSB), which leads to the emergence of additional "ultra-collinear" splitting phenomena and naive violations of the Goldstone-boson Equivalence Theorem. We suggest a particularly convenient choice of non-covariant gauge (dubbed "Goldstone Equivalence Gauge") that disentangles the effects of Goldstone bosons and gauge fields in the presence of EWSB, and allows trivial book-keeping of leading power corrections in the VEV. We implement a comprehensive, practical EW showering scheme based on these splitting functions using a Sudakov evolution formalism. Novel features in the implementation include a complete accounting of ultra-collinear effects, matching between shower and decay, kinematic back-reaction corrections in multi-stage showers, and mixed-state evolution of neutral bosons (gamma/Z/h) using density-matrices. We employ the EW showering formalism to study a number of important physical processes at O(1-10 TeV) energies. They include (a) electroweak partons in the initial state as the basis for vector-boson-fusion; (b) the emergence of "weak jets" such as those initiated by transverse gauge bosons, with individual splitting probabilities as large as O(30%); (c) EW showers initiated by top quarks, including Higgs bosons in the final state; (d) the occurrence of O(1) interference effects within EW showers involving the neutral bosons; and (e) EW corrections to new physics processes, as illustrated by production of a heavy vector boson (W') and the subsequent showering of its decay products.
  • We perform an extensive survey of non-standard Higgs decays that are consistent with the 125 GeV Higgs-like resonance. Our aim is to motivate a large set of new experimental analyses on the existing and forthcoming data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The explicit search for exotic Higgs decays presents a largely untapped discovery opportunity for the LHC collaborations, as such decays may be easily missed by other searches. We emphasize that the Higgs is uniquely sensitive to the potential existence of new weakly coupled particles and provide a unified discussion of a large class of both simplified and complete models that give rise to characteristic patterns of exotic Higgs decays. We assess the status of exotic Higgs decays after LHC Run 1. In many cases we are able to set new nontrivial constraints by reinterpreting existing experimental analyses. We point out that improvements are possible with dedicated analyses and perform some preliminary collider studies. We prioritize the analyses according to their theoretical motivation and their experimental feasibility. This document is accompanied by a website that will be continuously updated with further information: http://exotichiggs.physics.sunysb.edu.
  • At proposed future hadron colliders and in the coming years at the LHC, top quarks will be produced at genuinely multi-TeV energies. Top-tagging at such high energies forces us to confront several new issues in terms of detector capabilities and jet physics. Here, we explore these issues in the context of some simple JHU/CMS-type declustering algorithms and the N-subjettiness jet-shape variable tau_32. We first highlight the complementarity between the two tagging approaches at particle-level with respect to discriminating top-jets against gluons and quarks, using multivariate optimization scans. We then introduce a basic fast detector simulation, including electromagnetic calorimeter showering patterns determined from GEANT. We consider a number of tricks for processing the fast detector output back to an approximate particle-level picture. Re-optimizing the tagger parameters, we demonstrate that the inevitable losses in discrimination power at very high energies can typically be ameliorated. For example, percent-scale mistag rates might be maintained even in extreme cases where an entire top decay would sit inside of one hadronic calorimeter cell and tracking information is completely absent. We then study three novel physics effects that will come up in the multi-TeV energy regime: gluon radiation off of boosted top quarks, mistags originating from g -> tt, and mistags originating from q -> (W/Z)q collinear electroweak splittings with subsequent hadronic decays. The first effect, while nominally a nuisance, can actually be harnessed to slightly improve discrimination against gluons. The second effect can lead to effective O(1) enhancements of gluon mistag rates for tight working points. And the third effect, while conceptually interesting, we show to be of highly subleading importance at all energies.
  • Searches for supersymmetric top quarks at the LHC have been making great progress in pushing sensitivity out to higher mass, but are famously plagued by gaps in coverage around lower-mass regions where the decay phase space is closing off. Within the common stop-NLSP / neutralino-LSP simplified model, the line in the mass plane where there is just enough phase space to produce an on-shell top quark remains almost completely unconstrained. Here, we show that is possible to define searches capable of probing a large patch of this difficult region, with S/B ~ 1 and significances often well beyond 5 sigma. The basic strategy is to leverage the large energy gain of LHC Run 2, leading to a sizable population of stop pair events recoiling against a hard jet. The recoil not only re-establishes a MET signature, but also leads to a distinctive anti-correlation between the MET and the recoil jet transverse vectors when the stops decay all-hadronically. Accounting for jet combinatorics, backgrounds, and imperfections in MET measurements, we estimate that Run 2 will already start to close the gap in exclusion sensitivity with the first few 10s of inverse-fb. By 300/fb, exclusion sensitivity may extend from stop masses of 550 GeV on the high side down to below 200 GeV on the low side, approaching the "stealth" point at m(stop) = m(top) and potentially overlapping with limits from top pair cross section and spin correlation measurements.
  • Supersymmetry searches at the LHC are both highly varied and highly constraining, but the vast majority are focused on cases where the final-stage visible decays are prompt. Scenarios featuring superparticles with detector-scale lifetimes have therefore remained a tantalizing possibility for sub-TeV SUSY, since explicit limits are relatively sparse. Nonetheless, the extremely low backgrounds of the few existing searches for collider-stable and displaced new particles facilitates recastings into powerful long-lived superparticle searches, even for models for which those searches are highly non-optimized. In this paper, we assess the status of such models in the context of baryonic R-parity violation, gauge mediation, and mini-split SUSY. We explore a number of common simplified spectra where hadronic decays can be important, employing recasts of LHC searches that utilize different detector systems and final-state objects. The LSP/NLSP possibilities considered here include generic colored superparticles such as the gluino and light-flavor squarks, as well as the lighter stop and the quasi-degenerate Higgsino multiplet motivated by naturalness. We find that complementary coverage over large swaths of mass and lifetime is achievable by superimposing limits, particularly from CMS's tracker-based displaced dijet search and heavy stable charged particle searches. Adding in prompt searches, we find many cases where a range of sparticle masses is now excluded from zero lifetime to infinite lifetime with no gaps. In other cases, the displaced searches furnish the only extant limits at any lifetime.
  • Observables sensitive to top quark polarization are important for characterizing or even discovering new physics. The most powerful spin analyzer in top decay is the down-type fermion from the W, which in the case of leptonic decay allows for very clean measurements. However, in many applications it is useful to measure the polarization of hadronically decaying top quarks. Usually it is assumed that at most 50% of the spin analyzing power can be recovered in this case. This paper introduces a simple and truly optimal hadronic spin analyzer, with a power of 64% at leading-order. The improvement is demonstrated to be robust at next-to-leading order, and in a handful of simulated measurements including the spins and spin correlations of boosted top quarks from multi-TeV top-antitop resonances, the spins of semi-boosted tops from chiral stop decays, and the potentially CP-violating spin correlations induced in continuum top pairs by color dipole operators. For the boosted studies, we explore jet substructure techniques that exhibit improved mapping between subjets and quarks.
  • If the lighter stop eigenstate decays directly to two jets via baryonic R-parity violation, it could have escaped existing LHC and Tevatron searches in four-jet events, even for masses as small as 100 GeV. In order to recover sensitivity in the face of increasingly harsh trigger requirements at the LHC, we propose a search for stop pairs in the highly-boosted regime, using the approaches of jet substructure. We demonstrate that the four-jet triggers can be completely bypassed by using inclusive jet-H_T triggers, and that the resulting QCD continuum background can be processed by substructure methods into a featureless spectrum suitable for a data-driven bump-hunt down to 100 GeV. We estimate that the LHC 8 TeV run is sensitive to 100 GeV stops with decays of any flavor at better than 5-sigma level, and could place exclusions up to 300 GeV or higher. Assuming Minimal Flavor Violation and running a b-tagged analysis, exclusion reach may extend up to nearly 400 GeV. Longer-term, the 14 TeV LHC at 300/fb could extend these mass limits by a factor of two, while continuing to improve sensitivity in the 100 GeV region.
  • The forward-backward asymmetry in top pair production at the Tevatron has long been in tension with the Standard Model prediction. One of the only viable new physics scenarios capable of explaining this anomaly is an s-channel axigluon-like resonance, with the quantum numbers of the gluon but with significant axial couplings to quarks. While such a resonance can lead to a clear bump or excess in the ttbar or dijet mass spectra, it may also simply be too broad to cleanly observe. Here, we point out that broad ttbar resonances generally lead to net top and antitop polarizations transverse to the production plane. This polarization is consistent with all discrete spacetime symmetries, and, analogous to the forward-backward asymmetry itself, is absent in QCD at leading order. Within the parameter space consistent with the asymmetry measurements, the induced polarization can be sizable, and might be observable at the Tevatron or the LHC.
  • Supersymmetric spectra with a stop NLSP and a neutralino or gravitino LSP present a special challenge for collider searches. For stop pairs directly produced from QCD, the visible final-state particles are identical to those of top quark pair production, giving very similar kinematics but often with much smaller rates. The situation is exacerbated for compressed spectra with m(stop) ~ m(top) + m(LSP), as well as for lighter stops which can suffer from low acceptance efficiencies. In this note, we explore the power of a direct stop search using dileptonic mT2, similar to the one recently performed by ATLAS, but more optimized to cover these difficult regions of the (m(stop),m(LSP)) plane. Our study accounts for the effects of stop chirality and LSP identity, which can be significant. In particular, our estimates suggest that m(stop) ~ m(top) with a massless LSP is excludable for right-handed stops with bino-like (gravitino) LSP with 2012 (2011) data, but remains largely unobservable in the case of a higgsino-like singlino LSP. For each of these cases we map out the regions of parameter space that can be excluded with 2012 data, as well as currently allowed regions that would yield discovery-level significance. We also comment on the prospects of a precision mT2 shape measurement, and consider the potential of ATLAS's dileptonic stop -> b chi^+ searches when re-interpreted for light stops decaying directly to the LSP.
  • In the presence of even minuscule baryonic R-parity violation, the stop can be the lightest superpartner and evade LHC searches because it decays into two jets. In order to cover this interesting possibility, we here consider new searches for RPV stops produced in gluino cascades. While typical searches for gluinos decaying to stops rely on same-sign dileptons, the RPV cascades usually have fewer hard leptons, less excess missing energy, and more jets than R-parity conserving cascades. If the gluino is a Dirac fermion, same-sign dilepton signals are also often highly depleted. We therefore explore search strategies that use single-lepton channels, and combat backgrounds using HT, jet counting, and more detailed multijet kinematics or jet substructure. We demonstrate that the stop mass peaks can be fully reconstructed over a broad range of spectra, even given the very high jet multiplicities. This would not only serve as a "double-discovery" opportunity, but would also be a spectacular confirmation that the elusive top-partner has been hiding in multijets.
  • Top-antitop pairs produced at hadron colliders are largely unpolarized, but their spins are highly correlated. The structure of these correlations varies significantly over top production phase space, allowing very detailed tests of the Standard Model. Here, we explore top quark spin correlation measurement from a general perspective, highlighting the role of azimuthal decay angles. By taking differences and sums of these angles about the top-antitop production axis, the presence of spin correlations can be seen as sinusoidal modulations resulting from the interference of different helicity channels. At the LHC, these modulations exhibit nontrivial evolution from near-threshold production into the boosted regime, where they become sensitive to almost the entire QCD correlation effect for centrally produced tops. We demonstrate that this form of spin correlation measurement is very robust under full kinematic reconstruction, and should already be observable with high significance using the current LHC data set. We also illustrate some novel ways that new physics can alter the azimuthal distributions. In particular, we estimate the power of our proposed measurements in probing for anomalous color-dipole operators, as well as for broad resonances with parity-violating couplings. Using these methods, the 2012 run of the LHC may be capable of setting simultaneous limits on the top quark's anomalous chromomagnetic and chromoelectric dipole moments at the level of 3*10^{-18}cm (0.03/m_t).
  • New particles at the TeV-scale may have sizeable decay rates into boosted Higgs bosons or other heavy scalars. Here, we investigate the possibility of identifying such processes when the Higgs/scalar subsequently decays into a pair of W bosons, constituting a highly distinctive "diboson-jet." These can appear as a simple dilepton (plus MET) configuration, as a two-prong jet with an embedded lepton, or as a four-prong jet. We study jet substructure methods to discriminate these objects from their dominant backgrounds. We then demonstrate the use of these techniques in the search for a heavy spin-one Z' boson, such as may arise from strong dynamics or an extended gauge sector, utilizing the decay chain Z' -> Zh -> Z(WW^(*)). We find that modes with multiple boosted hadronic Zs and Ws tend to offer the best prospects for the highest accessible masses. For 100/fb luminosity at the 14 TeV LHC, Z' decays into a standard 125 GeV Higgs can be observed with 5-sigma significance for masses of 1.5-2.5 TeV for a range of models. For a 200 GeV Higgs (requiring nonstandard couplings, such as fermiophobic), the reach may improve to up to 2.5-3.0 TeV.
  • Top-antitop pairs produced in the decay of a new heavy resonance will exhibit spin correlations that contain valuable coupling information. When the tops decay, these correlations imprint themselves on the angular patterns of the final quarks and leptons. While many approaches to the measurement of top spin correlations are known, the most common ones require detailed kinematic reconstructions and are insensitive to some important spin interference effects. In particular, spin-1 resonances with mostly-vector or mostly-axial couplings to top cannot be easily discriminated from one another without appealing to mass-suppressed effects or to more model-dependent interference with continuum Standard Model production. Here, we propose to probe the structure of a resonance's couplings to tops by measuring the azimuthal angles of the tops' decay products about the production axis. These angles exhibit modulations which are typically O(0.1-1), and which by themselves allow for discrimination of spin-0 from higher spins, measurement of the CP-phase for spin-0, and measurement of the vector/axial composition for spins 1 and 2. For relativistic tops, the azimuthal decay angles can be well-approximated without detailed knowledge of the tops' velocities, and appear to be robust against imperfect energy measurements and neutrino reconstructions. We illustrate this point in the highly challenging dileptonic decay mode, which also exhibits the largest modulations. We comment on the relevance of these observables for testing axigluon-like models that explain the top quark A_FB anomaly at the Tevatron, through direct production at the LHC.
  • A systematic method for optimizing multivariate discriminants is developed and applied to the important example of a light Higgs boson search at the Tevatron and the LHC. The Significance Improvement Characteristic (SIC), defined as the signal efficiency of a cut or multivariate discriminant divided by the square root of the background efficiency, is shown to be an extremely powerful visualization tool. SIC curves demonstrate numerical instabilities in the multivariate discriminants, show convergence as the number of variables is increased, and display the sensitivity to the optimal cut values. For our application, we concentrate on Higgs boson production in association with a W or Z boson with H -> bb and compare to the irreducible standard model background, Z/W + bb. We explore thousands of experimentally motivated, physically motivated, and unmotivated single variable discriminants. Along with the standard kinematic variables, a number of new ones, such as twist, are described which should have applicability to many processes. We find that some single variables, such as the pull angle, are weak discriminants, but when combined with others they provide important marginal improvement. We also find that multiple Higgs boson-candidate mass measures, such as from mild and aggressively trimmed jets, when combined may provide additional discriminating power. Comparing the significance improvement from our variables to those used in recent CDF and DZero searches, we find that a 10-20% improvement in significance against Z/W + bb is possible. Our analysis also suggests that the H + W/Z channel with H -> bb is also viable at the LHC, without requiring a hard cut on the W/Z transverse momentum.
  • New TeV-scale physics processes at the LHC can produce Higgs bosons with substantive transverse Lorentz boost, such that the Higgs's decay products are nominally contained in a single jet. In the case of a light Higgs decaying predominantly to bb, previous studies have shown that these Higgs-jets can be identified by capitalizing on jet substructure techniques. In this work, we explore the possibility of also utilizing the subdominant but very distinctive decay h -> tau tau. To this end, we introduce the concept of a ``ditau-jet,'' or a jet consisting of two semi-collinear taus where one or both decay hadronically. We perform simple modifications to ordinary tau tagging methods to account for this configuration, and estimate tag rates of order 50% and QCD mistag rates of order 0.1%-0.01% for p_T TeV, even in the presence of pileup. We further demonstrate the feasibility of reconstructing the ditau invariant mass by using traditional MET projection techniques. Given these tools, we estimate the sensitivity of the LHC for discovery of a multi-TeV Z' decaying to Zh, utilizing both leptonic and hadronic Z decay channels. The leptonic Z channel is limited due to low statistics, but the hadronic Z channel is potentially competitive with other searches.
  • Strongly coupled models at the TeV scale often predict one or more neutral spin-one resonances (Z') which have appreciable branching fractions to electroweak bosons, namely the Higgs and longitudinal W and Z. These resonances are usually believed to have multi-TeV mass due to electroweak precision constraints, placing them on the edge of LHC discovery reach. Searching for them is made particularly challenging because hadronically decaying electroweak bosons produced at such high energy will appear very similar to QCD jets. In this work we revisit the possibility of discovering these resonances at the LHC, taking advantage of recently developed jet substructure techniques. We make a systematic investigation of substructure performance for the identification of highly Lorentz-boosted electroweak bosons, which should also be applicable to more general new physics searches. We then estimate the model-independent Z' discovery reach for the most promising final-state channels, and find significant improvements compared to previous analyses. For modes involving the Higgs, we focus on a light Higgs decaying to b quarks. We further highlight several other novelties of these searches. In the case that vertex-based b-tagging becomes inefficient at high p_T, we explore the utility of a muon-based b-tag, or no b-tag at all. We also introduce the mode Z' -> Zh -> (invisible)(bb) as a competitive discovery channel.
  • Top quarks produced in multi-TeV processes will have large Lorentz boosts, and their decay products will be highly collimated. In semileptonic decay modes, this often leads to the merging of the b-jet and the hard lepton according to standard event reconstructions, which can complicate new physics searches. Here we explore ways of efficiently recovering this signal in the muon channel at the LHC. We perform a particle-level study of events with muons produced inside of boosted tops, as well as in generic QCD jets and from W-strahlung off of hard quarks. We characterize the discriminating power of cuts previously explored in the literature, as well two new ones. We find a particularly powerful isolation variable which can potentially reject light QCD jets with hard embedded muons at the 10^3 level while retaining 80~90% of the tops. This can also be fruitfully combined with other cuts for O(1) greater discrimination. For W-strahlung, a simple pT-scaled maximum \Delta R cut performs comparably to a highly idealized top-mass reconstruction, rejecting an O(1) fraction of the background with percent-scale loss of signal. Using these results, we suggest a set of well-motivated baseline cuts for any physics analysis involving semileptonic top quarks at TeV-scale momenta, using neither b-tagging nor missing energy as discriminators. We demonstrate the utility of our cuts in searching for resonances in the top-antitop invariant mass spectrum. For example, our results suggest that 100 fb^{-1} of data from a 14 TeV LHC could be used to discover a warped KK gluon up to 4.5 TeV or higher.
  • Although the sneutrino is a viable NLSP candidate with gravitino LSP, spectra of this type occupy a part of SUSY parameter space in which collider signatures are poorly studied. In this paper we will extend previous work on this topic to include sneutrino NLSP spectra with non-minimal phenomenology. Generally, these spectra exhibit very leptophilic behavior, which can be easily observed at the LHC. We show that a variety of such spectra can be analysed with similar techniques, leading in each case to very suggestive evidence for complicated decay chains that end in sneutrinos. Amongst the variations considered, we find a simple class of spectra that produce signals with strong electron-muon asymmetries. These signals could naively be interpreted as evidence for lepton flavor violation, but can occur even with flavor-blind SUSY.
  • The sneutrino is a viable candidate for the NLSP in SUSY spectra with gravitino LSP. In this work we study the collider implications of this possibility. In particular, we investigate whether the LHC can distinguish it (at least, in some cases) from alternative spectra, such as those with a neutralino LSP. We show that there exists a complete family of experimentally allowed and theoretically motivated spectra with sneutrino NLSP, which exhibit very distinctive multilepton signals that are difficult to fake within the MSSM. We study these signals in detail, including the techniques necessary to find them. We demonstrate our analysis approach on simulations incorporating backgrounds.
  • We consider the possibility that the DAMA signal arises from channeled events in simple models where the dark matter interaction with nuclei is suppressed at small momenta. As with the standard WIMP, these models have two parameters (the dark matter mass and the size of the cross-section), without the need to introduce an additional energy threshold type of parameter. We find that they can be consistent with channeling fractions as low as about ~ 15%, so long as at least ~70% of the nuclear recoil energy for channeled events is deposited electronically. Given that there are reasons not to expect very large channeling fractions, these scenarios make the channeling explanation of DAMA much more compelling.
  • A method is introduced for distinguishing top jets (boosted, hadronically decaying top quarks) from light quark and gluon jets using jet substructure. The procedure involves parsing the jet cluster to resolve its subjets, and then imposing kinematic constraints. With this method, light quark or gluon jets with pT ~ 1 TeV can be rejected with an efficiency of around 99% while retaining up to 40% of top jets. This reduces the dijet background to heavy t-tbar resonances by a factor of ~10,000, thereby allowing resonance searches in t-tbar to be extended into the all-hadronic channel. In addition, top-tagging can be used in t-tbar events when one of the tops decays semi-leptonically, in events with missing energy, and in studies of b-tagging efficiency at high pT.
  • We consider the model of ``Chain Inflation,'' in which the period of inflation in our universe took the form of a long sequence of quantum tunneling events. We find that in the simplest such scenario, in which the tunneling processes are uniform, approximately 10^4 vacua per e-folding of inflation are required in order that the density perturbations produced are of an acceptable size. We arrive at this conclusion through a combination of analytic and numerical techniques, which could also serve as starting points for calculations with more general sets of assumptions.
  • We present a framework for grand unification in which the grand unified symmetry is broken spontaneously by strong gauge dynamics, and yet the physics at the unification scale is described by (weakly coupled) effective field theory. These theories are formulated, through the gauge/gravity correspondence, in truncated 5D warped spacetime with the UV and IR branes setting the Planck and unification scales, respectively. In most of these theories, the Higgs doublets arise as composite states of strong gauge dynamics, corresponding to degrees of freedom localized to the IR brane, and the observed hierarchies of quark and lepton masses and mixings are explained by the wavefunction profiles of these fields in the extra dimension. We present several realistic models in this framework. We focus on one in which the doublet-triplet splitting of the Higgs fields is realized within the dynamical sector by the pseudo-Goldstone mechanism, with the associated global symmetry corresponding to a bulk gauge symmetry in the 5D theory. Alternatively, the light Higgs doublets can arise as a result of dynamics on the IR brane, without being accompanied by their triplet partners. Gauge coupling unification and proton decay can be studied in these models using higher dimensional effective field theory. The framework also sets a stage for further studies of, e.g., proton decay, fermion masses, and supersymmetry breaking.
  • We construct realistic supersymmetric theories in which the correct scale for electroweak symmetry breaking is obtained without significant fine-tuning. We consider two classes of models. In one class supersymmetry breaking is transmitted to the supersymmetric standard model sector through Dirac gaugino mass terms generated by a D-term vacuum expectation value of a U(1) gauge field. In the other class the supersymmetry breaking sector is separated from the supersymmetric standard model sector in an extra dimension, and the transmission of supersymmetry breaking occurs through gauge mediation. In both these theories the Higgs sector contains two Higgs doublets and a singlet, but unlike the case for the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model the singlet field is not responsible for generating the supersymmetric or supersymmetry breaking mass for the Higgs doublets. These masses, as well as the mass for the singlet, are generated through gravitational-strength interactions. The scale at which the squark and slepton masses are generated is of order (1-100) TeV, and the generated masses do not respect the unified mass relations. We find that electroweak symmetry breaking in these theories is caused by an interplay between the top-stop radiative correction and the holomorphic supersymmetry breaking mass for the Higgs doublets and that the fine-tuning can be reduced to the level of 20%. The theories have rich phenomenology, including a variety of possibilities for the lightest supersymmetric particle.
  • We consider a scenario in which the dominant quartic coupling for the Higgs doublets arises from the F-term potential, rather than the conventional SU(2)_L x U(1)_Y D-term potential, in supersymmetric theories. The quartic coupling arises from a superpotential interaction between the two Higgs doublets and a singlet field, but unlike the case in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model the singlet field is not responsible for the generation of the supersymmetric or holomorphic supersymmetry-breaking masses for the Higgs doublets. We find that this naturally leads to a deviation from the conventional picture of top-Yukawa driven electroweak symmetry breaking -- electroweak symmetry breaking is triggered by the holomorphic supersymmetry breaking mass for the Higgs doublets (the \mu B term). This allows a significant improvement for fine-tuning in electroweak symmetry breaking, since the top squarks do not play a major role in raising the Higgs boson mass or in triggering electroweak symmetry breaking and thus can be light. The amount of fine-tuning is given by the squared ratio of the lightest Higgs boson mass to the charged Higgs boson mass, which can be made better than 20%. Solid implications of the scenario include a small value for tan\beta, less than about 3, and relatively light top squarks.