• We present Very Long Baseline Interferometry observations of a faint and low-luminosity ($L_{\rm 1.4 GHz} < 10^{27}~\mbox{W Hz}^{-1}$) Gigahertz-Peaked Spectrum (GPS) and Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) sample. We select eight sources from deep radio observations that have radio spectra characteristic of a GPS or CSS source and an angular size of $\theta \lesssim 2$ arcsec, and detect six of them with the Australian Long Baseline Array. We determine their linear sizes, and model their radio spectra using Synchrotron Self Absorption (SSA) and Free Free Absorption (FFA) models. We derive statistical model ages, based on a fitted scaling relation, and spectral ages, based on the radio spectrum, which are generally consistent with the hypothesis that GPS and CSS sources are young and evolving. We resolve the morphology of one CSS source with a radio luminosity of $10^{25}~\mbox{W Hz}^{-1}$, and find what appear to be two hotspots spanning 1.7 kpc. We find that our sources follow the turnover-linear size relation, and that both homogenous SSA and an inhomogeneous FFA model can account for the spectra with observable turnovers. All but one of the FFA models do not require a spectral break to account for the radio spectrum, while all but one of the alternative SSA and power law models do require a spectral break to account for the radio spectrum. We conclude that our low-luminosity sample is similar to brighter samples in terms of their spectral shape, turnover frequencies, linear sizes, and ages, but cannot test for a difference in morphology.
  • We present a low-frequency, broadband polarization study of the FRII radio galaxy PKS J0636-2036 (z = 0.0551), using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) from 70 to 230 MHz. The northern and southern hotspots (separated by ~14.5' on the sky) are resolved by the MWA (3'.3 resolution) and both are detected in linear polarization across the full frequency range. A combination of Faraday rotation measure (RM) synthesis and broadband polarization model-fitting are used to constrain the Faraday depolarization properties of the source. For the integrated southern hotspot emission, two RM component models are strongly favoured over a single RM component, and the best-fitting model requires Faraday dispersions of approximately 0.7 and 1.2 rad/m$^2$ (with a mean RM of ~50 rad/m$^2$). High resolution imaging at 5" with the ATCA shows significant sub-structure in the southern hotspot and highlights some of the limitations in the polarization modelling of the MWA data. Based on the observed depolarization, combined with extrapolations of gas density scaling-relations for group environments, we estimate magnetic field strengths in the intergalactic medium between ~0.04 and 0.5 {\mu}G. We also comment on future prospects of detecting more polarized sources at low frequencies.
  • We present a search for the synchrotron emission from the synchrotron cosmic web by cross correlating 180MHz radio images from the Murchison Widefield Array with tracers of large scale structure (LSS). We use two versions of the radio image covering $21.76\times 21.76$ degrees with point sources brighter than 0.05 Jy subtracted, with and without filtering of Galactic emission. As tracers of the LSS we use the Two-Micron-All-Sky-Survey (2MASS) and the Widefield InfraRed Explorer (WISE) redshift catalogues to produce galaxy number density maps. The cross correlation functions all show peak amplitudes at zero degrees, decreasing with varying slopes towards zero correlation over a range of one degree. The cross correlation signals include components from point source, Galactic, and extragalactic diffuse emission. We use models of the diffuse emission from smoothing the density maps with Gaussians of sizes 1-4 Mpc to find limits on the cosmic web components. From these models we find surface brightness 99.7 per cent upper limits in the range of 0.09-2.20 mJy beam$^{-1}$ (average beam size of 2.6 arcmin), corresponding to 0.01-0.30 mJy arcmin$^{-2}$. Assuming equipartition between energy densities of cosmic rays and the magnetic field, the flux density limits translate to magnetic field strength limits of 0.03-1.98 $\mu$G, depending heavily on the spectral index. We conclude that for a 3$\sigma$ detection of 0.1 $\mu$G magnetic field strengths via cross correlations, image depths of sub-mJy to sub-$\mu$Jy are necessary. We include discussion on the treatment and effect of extragalactic point sources and Galactic emission, and next steps for building on this work.
  • Using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), the low-frequency Square Kilometre Array (SKA1 LOW) precursor located in Western Australia, we have completed the GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky MWA (GLEAM) survey, and present the resulting extragalactic catalogue, utilising the first year of observations. The catalogue covers 24,831 square degrees, over declinations south of $+30^\circ$ and Galactic latitudes outside $10^\circ$ of the Galactic plane, excluding some areas such as the Magellanic Clouds. It contains 307,455 radio sources with 20 separate flux density measurements across 72--231MHz, selected from a time- and frequency- integrated image centred at 200MHz, with a resolution of $\approx 2$'. Over the catalogued region, we estimate that the catalogue is 90% complete at 170mJy, and 50% complete at 55mJy, and large areas are complete at even lower flux density levels. Its reliability is 99.97% above the detection threshold of $5\sigma$, which itself is typically 50mJy. These observations constitute the widest fractional bandwidth and largest sky area survey at radio frequencies to date, and calibrate the low frequency flux density scale of the southern sky to better than 10%. This paper presents details of the flagging, imaging, mosaicking, and source extraction/characterisation, as well as estimates of the completeness and reliability. All source measurements and images are available online (http://www.mwatelescope.org/science/gleam-survey). This is the first in a series of publications describing the GLEAM survey results.
  • (abridged) Observations of Faraday rotation for extragalactic sources probe magnetic fields both inside and outside the Milky Way. Building on our earlier estimate of the Galactic contribution, we set out to estimate the extragalactic contributions. We discuss the problems involved; in particular, we point out that taking the difference between the observed values and the Galactic foreground reconstruction is not a good estimate for the extragalactic contributions. We point out a degeneracy between the contributions to the observed values due to extragalactic magnetic fields and observational noise and comment on the dangers of over-interpreting an estimate without taking into account its uncertainty information. To overcome these difficulties, we develop an extended reconstruction algorithm based on the assumption that the observational uncertainties are accurately described for a subset of the data, which can overcome the degeneracy with the extragalactic contributions. We present a probabilistic derivation of the algorithm and demonstrate its performance using a simulation, yielding a high quality reconstruction of the Galactic Faraday rotation foreground, a precise estimate of the typical extragalactic contribution, and a well-defined probabilistic description of the extragalactic contribution for each data point. We then apply this reconstruction technique to a catalog of Faraday rotation observations. We vary our assumptions about the data, showing that the dispersion of extragalactic contributions to observed Faraday depths is most likely lower than 7 rad/m^2, in agreement with earlier results, and that the extragalactic contribution to an individual data point is poorly constrained by the data in most cases.
  • Recent observations with the Murchison Widefield Array at 185~MHz have serendipitously unveiled a heretofore unknown giant and relatively nearby ($z = 0.0178$) radio galaxy associated with NGC\,1534. The diffuse emission presented here is the first indication that NGC\,1534 is one of a rare class of objects (along with NGC\,5128 and NGC\,612) in which a galaxy with a prominent dust lane hosts radio emission on scales of $\sim$700\,kpc. We present details of the radio emission along with a detailed comparison with other radio galaxies with disks. NGC1534 is the lowest surface brightness radio galaxy known with an estimated scaled 1.4-GHz surface brightness of just 0.2\,mJy\,arcmin$^{-2}$. The radio lobes have one of the steepest spectral indices yet observed: $\alpha=-2.1\pm0.1$, and the core to lobe luminosity ratio is $<0.1$\%. We estimate the space density of this low brightness (dying) phase of radio galaxy evolution as $7\times10^{-7}$\,Mpc$^{-3}$ and argue that normal AGN cannot spend more than 6\% of their lifetime in this phase if they all go through the same cycle.
  • In this paper we explore for the first time the relative magnitudes of three fundamental sources of uncertainty, namely, foreground contamination, thermal noise and sample variance in detecting the HI power spectrum from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). We derive limits on the sensitivity of a Fourier synthesis telescope to detect EoR based on its array configuration and a statistical representation of images made by the instrument. We use the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) configuration for our studies. Using a unified framework for estimating signal and noise components in the HI power spectrum, we derive an expression for and estimate the contamination from extragalactic point-like sources in three-dimensional k-space. Sensitivity for EoR HI power spectrum detection is estimated for different observing modes with MWA. With 1000 hours of observing on a single field using the 128-tile MWA, EoR detection is feasible (S/N > 1 for $k\lesssim 0.8$ Mpc$^{-1}$). Bandpass shaping and refinements to the EoR window are found to be effective in containing foreground contamination, which makes the instrument tolerant to imaging errors. We find that for a given observing time, observing many independent fields of view does not offer an advantage over a single field observation when thermal noise dominates over other uncertainties in the derived power spectrum.
  • We have searched for prompt radio emission from nine Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) with a 12 m telescope at 1.4 GHz, with a time resolution of 64 us to 1 s. We detected single dispersed radio pulses with significances >6 sigma in the few minutes following two GRBs. The dispersion measures of both pulses are well in excess of the expected Galactic values, and the implied rate is incompatible with known sources of single dispersed pulses. The arrival times of both pulses also coincide with breaks in the GRB X-ray light curves. A null trial and statistical arguments rule out random fluctuations as the origin of these pulses with >95% and 97% confidence, respectively, although a simple population argument supports a GRB origin with confidence of only 2%. We caution that we cannot rule out RFI as the origin of these pulses. If the single pulses are not related to the GRBs we set an upper limit on the flux density of radio pulses emitted between 200 to 1800 s after a GRB of 1.27 w^{-1/2} Jy, where 64 us < w < 32 ms is the pulse width. We set a limit of less than 760 Jy for long timescale (>1 s) variations. These limits are some of the most constraining at high time resolution and GHz frequencies in the early stages of the GRB phenomenon.
  • A fully analytic statistical formalism does not yet exist to describe radio-wavelength measurements of linearly polarized intensity that are produced using rotation measure synthesis. In this work we extend the analytic formalism for standard linear polarization, namely that describing measurements of the quadrature sum of Stokes Q and U intensities, to the rotation measure synthesis environment. We derive the probability density function and expectation value for Faraday-space polarization measurements for both the case where true underlying polarized emission is present within unresolved Faraday components, and for the limiting case where no such emission is present. We then derive relationships to quantify the statistical significance of linear polarization measurements in terms of standard Gaussian statistics. The formalism developed in this work will be useful for setting signal-to-noise ratio detection thresholds for measurements of linear polarization, for the analysis of polarized sources potentially exhibiting multiple Faraday components, and for the development of polarization debiasing schemes.
  • We present BLOBCAT, new source extraction software that utilises the flood fill algorithm to detect and catalogue blobs, or islands of pixels representing sources, in two-dimensional astronomical images. The software is designed to process radio-wavelength images of both Stokes I intensity and linear polarization, the latter formed through the quadrature sum of Stokes Q and U intensities or as a byproduct of rotation measure synthesis. We discuss an objective, automated method by which estimates of position-dependent background root-mean-square noise may be obtained and incorporated into BLOBCAT's analysis. We derive and implement within BLOBCAT corrections for two systematic biases to enable the flood fill algorithm to accurately measure flux densities for Gaussian sources. We discuss the treatment of non-Gaussian sources in light of these corrections. We perform simulations to validate the flux density and positional measurement performance of BLOBCAT, and we benchmark the results against those of a standard Gaussian fitting task. We demonstrate that BLOBCAT exhibits accurate measurement performance in total intensity and, in particular, linear polarization. BLOBCAT is particularly suited to the analysis of large survey data. The BLOBCAT software, supplemented with test data to illustrate its use, is available at: http://blobcat.sourceforge.net/ .
  • We present mid-infrared continuum and emission line images of the Galactic oxygen-rich supernova remnant (SNR) G292.0+1.8, acquired using the MIPS and IRS instruments on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The MIPS 24 micron and 70 micron images of G292.0+1.8 are dominated by continuum emission from a network of filaments encircling the SNR. The morphology of the SNR, as seen in the mid-infrared, resembles that seen in X-rays with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Most of the mid-infrared emission in the MIPS images is produced by circumstellar dust heated in the non-radiative shocks around G292.0+1.8, confirming the results of earlier mid-IR observations with AKARI. In addition to emission from hot dust, we have also mapped atomic line emission between 14 micron and 36 micron using IRS spectral maps. The line emission is primarily associated with the bright oxygen-rich optical knots, but is also detected from fast-moving knots of ejecta. We confirm our earlier detection of 15-25 micron emission characteristic of magnesium silicate dust in spectra of the radiatively shocked ejecta. We do not detect silicon line emission from any of the radiatively shocked ejecta in the southeast of the SNR, possibly because that the reverse shock has not yet penetrated most of the Si-rich ejecta in that region. This may indicate that G292.0+1.8 is less evolved in the southeast than the rest of the SNR, and may be further evidence in favor of an asymmetric SN explosion as proposed in recent X-ray studies of G292.0+1.8.
  • The interstellar medium of the Milky Way is multi-phase, magnetized and turbulent. Turbulence in the interstellar medium produces a global cascade of random gas motions, spanning scales ranging from 100 parsecs to 1000 kilometres. Fundamental parameters of interstellar turbulence such as the sonic Mach number (the speed of sound) have been difficult to determine because observations have lacked the sensitivity and resolution to directly image the small-scale structure associated with turbulent motion. Observations of linear polarization and Faraday rotation in radio emission from the Milky Way have identified unusual polarized structures that often have no counterparts in the total radiation intensity or at other wavelengths, and whose physical significance has been unclear. Here we report that the gradient of the Stokes vector (Q,U), where Q and U are parameters describing the polarization state of radiation, provides an image of magnetized turbulence in diffuse ionized gas, manifested as a complex filamentary web of discontinuities in gas density and magnetic field. Through comparison with simulations, we demonstrate that turbulence in the warm ionized medium has a relatively low sonic Mach number, M_s <~ 2. The development of statistical tools for the analysis of polarization gradients will allow accurate determinations of the Mach number, Reynolds number and magnetic field strength in interstellar turbulence over a wide range of conditions.
  • We present a study of the line-of-sight magnetic fields in five large-diameter Galactic HII regions. Using the Faraday rotation of background polarized radio sources, as well as dust-corrected H-alpha surface brightness as a probe of electron density, we estimated the strength and orientation of the magnetic field along 93 individual sight-lines through the HII regions. Each of the HII regions displayed a coherent magnetic field. The magnetic field strength (line-of-sight component) in the regions ranges from 2 to 6 microgauss, which is similar to the typical magnetic field strength in the diffuse interstellar medium. We investigated the relationship between magnetic field strength and electron density in the 5 HII regions. The slope of magnetic field vs. density in the low-density regime (0.8 < n_e < 30 per cubic cm) is very slightly above zero. We also calculated the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure, beta_th, for each data point, which fell in the range 1.01 < beta_th < 25. Finally, we studied the orientation of the magnetic field in the solar neighborhood (d < 1.1 kpc) using our data from 5 HII regions along with existing measurements of the line-of-sight magnetic field strength from polarized pulsars whose distances have been determined from their annual parallax. We identify a net direction for the magnetic field in the solar neighborhood, but find no evidence for a preferred vertical direction of the magnetic field above or below the Galactic plane.
  • We describe the process of stacking radio interferometry visibilities to form a deep composite image and its application to the observation of transient phenomena. We apply "visibility stacking" to 46 archival Very Large Array observations of nearby type Ia supernovae (SNeIa). This new approach provides an upper limit on the SNIa ensemble peak radio luminosity of 1.2x10^{25}erg/s/Hz at 5GHz, which is 5-10 times lower than previously measured. This luminosity implies an upper limit on the average companion stellar wind mass loss rate of 1.3x10^{-7}M_o/yr. This mass loss rate is consistent with the double degenerate scenario for SNeIa and rules out intermediate and high mass companions in the single degenerate scenario. In the era of time domain astronomy, techniques such as visibility stacking will be important in extracting the maximum amount of information from observations of populations of short lived events.
  • We describe a 22-year survey for variable and transient radio sources, performed with archival images taken with the Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope (MOST). This survey covers $2775 \unit{deg^2}$ of the sky south of $\delta < -30\degree$ at an observing frequency of 843 MHz, an angular resolution of $45 \times 45 \csc | \delta| \unit{arcsec^2}$ and a sensitivity of $5 \sigma \geq 14 \unit{mJy beam^{-1}}$. We describe a technique to compensate for image gain error, along with statistical techniques to check and classify variability in a population of light curves, with applicability to any image-based radio variability survey. Among radio light curves for almost 30000 sources, we present 53 highly variable sources and 15 transient sources. Only 3 of the transient sources, and none of the variable sources have been previously identified as transient or variable. Many of our variable sources are suspected scintillating Active Galactic Nuclei. We have identified three variable sources and one transient source that are likely to be associated with star forming galaxies at $z \simeq 0.05$, but whose implied luminosity is higher than the most luminous known radio supernova (SN1979C) by an order of magnitude. We also find a class of variable and transient source with no optical counterparts.
  • SGR~0501+4516 was discovered with the Swift satellite on 2008 August 22, after it emitted a series of very energetic bursts. Since then, the source was extensively monitored with Swift, the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and observed with Chandra and XMM-Newton, providing a wealth of information about its outburst behavior and burst induced changes of its persistent X-ray emission. Here we report the most accurate location of SGR~0501+4516 (with an accuracy of 0.11'') derived with Chandra. Using the combined RXTE, Swift/X-ray Telescope, Chandra and XMM-Newton observations we construct a phase connected timing solution with the longest time baseline (~240 days) to date for the source. We find that the pulse profile of the source is energy dependent and exhibits remarkable variations associated with the SGR~0501+4516 bursting activity. We also find significant spectral evolution (hardening) of the source persistent emission associated with bursts. Finally, we discuss the consequences of the SGR~0501+4516 proximity to the supernova remnant, SNR G160.9+2.6 (HB9).
  • One of the five key science projects for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is "The Origin and Evolution of Cosmic Magnetism", in which radio polarimetry will be used to reveal what cosmic magnets look like and what role they have played in the evolving Universe. Many of the SKA prototypes now being built are also targeting magnetic fields and polarimetry as key science areas. Here I review the prospects for innovative new polarimetry and Faraday rotation experiments with forthcoming facilities such as ASKAP, LOFAR, the ATA, the EVLA, and ultimately the SKA. Sensitive wide-field polarisation surveys with these telescopes will provide a dramatic new view of magnetic fields in the Milky Way, in nearby galaxies and clusters, and in the high-redshift Universe.
  • While gravitation sustains the on-going evolution of the cosmos, it is magnetism that breaks gravity's symmetry and that provides the pathway to the non-thermal Universe. By enabling processes such as anisotropic pressure support, particle acceleration, and jet collimation, magnetism has for billions of years regulated the feedback vital for returning matter to the interstellar and intergalactic medium. After reviewing recent results that demonstrate the unique view of magnetic fields provided by radio astronomy, I explain how the Square Kilometre Array will provide data that will reveal what cosmic magnets look like, how they formed, and what role they have played in the evolving Universe.
  • Magnetic fields are a fundamental part of many astrophysical phenomena, but the evolution, structure and origin of magnetic fields are still unresolved problems in physics and astrophysics. When and how were the first fields generated? Are present-day magnetic fields the result of standard dynamo action, or do they represent rapid or recent field amplification through other processes? What role do magnetic fields play in turbulence, cosmic ray acceleration and structure formation? I explain how the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), a next-generation radio telescope, can deliver stunning new data-sets that will address these currently unanswered issues. The foundation for these experiments will be an all-sky survey of rotation measures, in which Faraday rotation toward >10^7 background sources will provide a dense grid for probing magnetism in the Milky Way, nearby galaxies, and in distant galaxies, clusters and protogalaxies. Using these data, we can map out the evolution of magnetized structures from redshifts z > 3 to the present, can distinguish between different origins for seed magnetic fields in galaxies, and can develop a detailed model of the magnetic field geometry of the intergalactic medium and of the overall Universe. In addition, the SKA will certainly discover new magnetic phenomena beyond what we can currently predict or imagine.
  • Pulsars steadily dissipate their rotational energy via relativistic winds. Confinement of these outflows generates luminous pulsar wind nebulae, seen across the electromagnetic spectrum in synchrotron and inverse Compton emission, and in optical emission lines when they shock the surrounding medium. These sources act as important probes of relativistic shocks, particle acceleration and of interstellar gas. We review the many recent advances in the study of pulsar wind nebulae, with particular focus on the evolutionary stages through which these objects progress as they expand into their surroundings, and on morphological structures within these nebulae which directly trace the physical processes of particle acceleration and outflow. We conclude by considering some exciting new probes of pulsar wind nebulae, including the study of TeV gamma-ray emission from these sources, and observations of pulsar winds in close binary systems.
  • The Southern Galactic Plane Survey (SGPS) is a 1.4 GHz radio polarization and HI survey in a large part of the inner Galactic plane at a resolution of about an arcmin. Depolarization and Faraday rotation of polarized radiation from diffuse Galactic synchrotron emission, pulsars, and extragalactic sources can be used to infer information about the strength and structure of the Galactic magnetic field. Here, we discuss science results of the polarization data from the SGPS. We show from statistical analysis of rotation measures of polarized extragalactic sources that fluctuations in the magneto-ionized medium of the spiral arms are probably mainly caused by HII regions, while the rotation measure fluctuations in the interarm regions may be connected to the interstellar turbulent cascade. Furthermore, the variations of rotation measure with Galactic longitude enable modeling of the large-scale component of the Galactic magnetic field, including determination of the number and location of magnetic field reversals. Finally, the SGPS is an excellent way to study subparsec-scale structure in the ionized ISM by way of depolarization studies in HII regions.
  • We present a study of the Faraday rotation of extragalactic sources lying behind the Large Magellanic Cloud. These data represent the most detailed study yet of magnetic field structures in any external galaxy, and are a demonstration of how magnetic fields in galaxies will best be studied with future instruments.
  • Pulsar wind nebulae are now well established as important probes both of neutron stars' relativistic winds and of the surrounding interstellar medium. Amongst this diverse group of objects, pulsar bow shocks have long been regarded as an oddity, only seen around a handful of rapidly moving neutron stars. However, recent efforts at optical, radio and X-ray wavelengths have identified many new pulsar bow shocks, and these results have consequently motivated renewed theoretical efforts to model these systems. Here I review the new results and ideas which have emerged on these spectacular systems, and explain how bow shocks and "Crab-like" nebulae now form a consistent picture within our understanding of pulsar winds.
  • We present the results of a radio variability study of the gravitational lens PMN J1838-3427. Our motivation was to determine the Hubble constant by measuring the time delay between variations of the two quasar images. We monitored the system for 4 months (approximately 5 times longer than the expected delay) using the Australia Telescope Compact Array at 9 GHz. Although both images were variable on a time scale of a few days, no correlated intrinsic variability could be identified, and therefore no time delay could be measured. Notably, the fractional variation of the fainter image (8%) was greater than that of the brighter image (4%), whereas lensed images of a point source would have the same fractional variation. This effect can be explained, at least in part, as the refractive scintillation of both images due to the turbulent interstellar medium of the Galaxy.
  • A remarkable number of pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) are coincident with EGRET gamma-ray sources. X-ray and radio imaging studies of unidentified EGRET sources have resulted in the discovery of at least 6 new pulsar wind nebulae (PWN). Stationary PWN (SPWN) appear to be associated with steady EGRET sources with hard spectra, typical for gamma-ray pulsars. Their toroidal morphologies can help determine the geometry of the pulsar which is useful for constraining models of pulsed gamma-ray emission. Rapidly moving PWN (RPWN) with more cometary morphologies seem to be associated with variable EGRET sources in regions where the ambient medium is dense compared to what is typical for the ISM.