• We consider energy budgets and radiative history of 8 fading AGN, identified from mismatch between the ionizion of very extended (>10 kpc) ionized clouds and the luminosity of the nucleus viewed directly. All show significant fading on ~50,000-year timescales. We explore the use of minimum ionizing luminosity Q derived from photoionization balance in the brightest pixels in H-alpha at each projected radius. Tests using PG QSOs, and one target with detailed photoionization modeling, suggest that we can derive useful histories of individual AGN; the minimum ionizing luminosity is always an underestimate and subject to fine structure in the ionized material. These tests suggest that the underestimation from the upper envelope of Q values is roughly constant for a given object. These AGN show rapid drops and standstills; the common feature is a rapid drop in the last 20,000 years before our view of the nucleus. E-folding timescales are mostly thousands of years, with a few episodes as short as 400. In the limit of largely obscured AGN, we find additional evidence for fading, comparing lower limits from recombination balance and the maximum luminosities derived from from infrared fluxes. We compare these long-term light curves to simulations of AGN accretion; the strongest variations on these timespans are seen in models with strong and local feedback. Gemini integral-field optical spectroscopy shows a very limited role for outflows in these structures. While rings and loops of emission are common, their kinematic structure shows some to be in regular rotation. UGC 7342 exhibits local signatures of outflows <300 km/s, largely associated with very diffuse emission. Only in the Teacup AGN do we see outflow signatures of order 1000 km/s. Clouds around these fading AGN consist largely of tidal debris being externally illuminated but not displaced by AGN outflows. (Abridged)
  • The Type~Ia supernova (SN~Ia) 2016coj in NGC 4125 (redshift $z=0.004523$) was discovered by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search 4.9 days after the fitted first-light time (FFLT; 11.1 days before $B$-band maximum). Our first detection (pre-discovery) is merely $0.6\pm0.5$ day after the FFLT, making SN 2016coj one of the earliest known detections of a SN Ia. A spectrum was taken only 3.7 hr after discovery (5.0 days after the FFLT) and classified as a normal SN Ia. We performed high-quality photometry, low- and high-resolution spectroscopy, and spectropolarimetry, finding that SN 2016coj is a spectroscopically normal SN Ia, but with a high velocity of \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda$6355 ($\sim 12,600$\,\kms\ around peak brightness). The \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda$6355 velocity evolution can be well fit by a broken-power-law function for up to a month after the FFLT. SN 2016coj has a normal peak luminosity ($M_B \approx -18.9 \pm 0.2$ mag), and it reaches a $B$-band maximum \about16.0~d after the FFLT. We estimate there to be low host-galaxy extinction based on the absence of Na~I~D absorption lines in our low- and high-resolution spectra. The spectropolarimetric data exhibit weak polarization in the continuum, but the \ion{Si}{2} line polarization is quite strong ($\sim 0.9\% \pm 0.1\%$) at peak brightness.
  • A sample of 102 local (0.02 < z < 0.1) Seyfert galaxies with black hole masses MBH > 10^7 M_sun was selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and observed using the Keck 10-m telescope to study the scaling relations between MBH and host galaxy properties. We study profile changes of the broad Hbeta emission line within the ~3-9 year time-frame between the two sets of spectra. The variability of the broad Hbeta emission line is of particular interest, not only since it is used to estimate MBH, but also since its strength and width is used to classify Seyfert galaxies into different types. At least some form of broad-line variability (in either width or flux) is observed in the majority (~66%) of the objects, resulting in a Seyfert-type change for ~38% of the objects, likely driven by variable accretion and/or obscuration. The broad Hbeta line virtually disappears in 3/102 (~3%) extreme cases. We discuss potential causes for these changing-look AGNs. While similar dramatic transitions have previously been reported in the literature, either on a case-by-case basis or in larger samples focusing on quasars at higher redshifts, our study provides statistical information on the frequency of H$\beta$ line variability in a sample of low-redshift Seyfert galaxies.
  • We present narrow- and medium-band HST imaging, with additional supporting ground-based data, for 8 galaxies identified as hosting fading AGN. These have AGN-ionized gas projected >10 kpc from the nucleus, and significant shortfall of ionizing radiation between the distant gas and the AGN, indicating fading AGN on ~50,000-year timescales. Every system shows evidence of ongoing or past interactions; a similar sample of obscured AGN with extended ionized clouds shares this incidence of disturbances. Several systems show multiple dust lanes in different orientations, broadly fit by differentially precessing disks of accreted material ~1.5 Gyr after initial arrival. The gas has lower metallicity than the nuclei; three systems have abundances uniformly well below solar, consistent with an origin in tidally disrupted low-luminosity galaxies, while some systems have more nearly solar abundances (accompanied by such signatures as multiple Doppler components), which may suggest redistribution of gas by outflows within the host galaxies themselves. These aspects are consistent with a tidal origin for the extended gas in most systems, although the ionized gas and stellar tidal features do not always match closely. In contrast to clouds near radio-loud AGN, these are dominated by rotation, in some cases in warped disks. Outflows are important only in localized regions near some of the AGN. In UGC 7342 and UGC 11185, luminous star clusters are seen within projected ionization cones, potentially triggered by outflows. As in the discovery example Hanny's Voorwerp/IC 2497, some clouds lack a strong correlation between H-alpha surface brightness and ionization parameter, indicating unresolved fine structure. Together with thin coherent filaments spanning several kpc, persistence of these structures over their orbital lifetimes may require a role for magnetic confinement. (Abridged)