• We present near--infrared (NIR) imaging of FBQS J164442.5+261913, one of the few $\gamma$--ray emitting Narrow Line Seyfert 1 ($\gamma-$NLSy1) galaxies detected at high significance level by $Fermi$--LAT. This study is the first morphological analysis performed of this source and the third performed of this class of objects. Conducting a detailed two--dimensional modeling of its surface brightness distribution and analysing its $J-K_s$ colour gradients, we find that FBQS J164442.5+261913 is statistically most likely hosted by a barred lenticular galaxy (SB0). We find evidence that the bulge in the host galaxy of FBQS J164442.5+261913 is not classical but pseudo, against the paradigm of powerful relativistic jets exclusively launched by giant ellipticals. Our analysis, also reveal the presence of a ring with diameter equalling the bar length ($r_{bar} = 8.13\ \textrm{kpc}\pm 0.25$), whose origin might be a combination of bar--driven gas rearrangement and minor mergers, as revealed by the apparent merger remnant in the $J$--band image. In general, our results suggest that the prominent bar in the host galaxy of FBQS J164442.5+261913 has mostly contributed to its overall morphology driving a strong secular evolution, which plays a crucial role in the onset of the nuclear activity and the growth of the massive bulge. Minor mergers, in conjunction, are likely to provide the necessary fresh supply of gas to the central regions of the host galaxy.
  • Supermassive black holes launching plasma jets at close to speed of light, producing gamma-rays, have ubiquitously been found to be hosted by massive elliptical galaxies. Since elliptical galaxies are generally believed to be built through galaxy mergers, active galactic nuclei (AGN) launching relativistic jets are associated to the latest stages of galaxy evolution. We have discovered a pseudo-bulge morphology in the host galaxy of the gamma-ray AGN PKS 2004-447. This is the first gamma-ray emitter radio loud AGN found to be launched from a system where both black hole and host galaxy have been actively growing via secular processes. This is evidence for an alternative black hole-galaxy co-evolutionary path to develop powerful relativistic jets that is not merger-driven.
  • We present deep Near-infrared (NIR) images of a sample of 19 intermediate-redshift ($0.3<z<1.0$) radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) with powerful relativistic jets ($L_{1.4GHz} >10^{27}$ WHz$^{-1}$), previously classified as flat-spectrum radio quasars. We also compile host galaxy and nuclear magnitudes for blazars from literature. The combined sample (this work and compilation) contains 100 radio-loud AGN with host galaxy detections and a broad range of radio luminosities $L_{1.4GHz} \sim 10^{23.7} - 10^{28.3}$~WHz$^{-1}$, allowing us to divide our sample into high-luminosity blazars (HLBs) and low-luminosity blazars (LLBs). The host galaxies of our sample are bright and seem to follow the $\mu_{e}$-$R_{eff}$ relation for ellipticals and bulges. The two populations of blazars show different behaviours in the \mnuc - \mbulge plane, where a statistically significant correlation is observed for HLBs. Although it may be affected by selection effects, this correlation suggests a close coupling between the accretion mode of the central supermassive black hole and its host galaxy, that could be interpreted in terms of AGN feedback. Our findings are consistent with semi--analytical models where low--luminosity AGN emit the bulk of their energy in the form of radio jets, producing a strong feedback mechanism, and high--luminosity AGN are affected by galaxy mergers and interactions, which provide a common supply of cold gas to feed both nuclear activity and star formation episodes.
  • We explore the connection between the black hole mass and its relativistic jet for a sample of radio-loud AGN (z < 1), in which the relativistic jet parameters are well estimated by means of long term monitoring with the 14m Mets\"ahovi millimeter wave telescope and the Very Long Base-line Array (VLBA). NIR host galaxy images taken with the NOTCam on the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) and retrieved from the 2MASS all-sky survey allowed us to perform a detailed surface brightness decomposition of the host galaxies in our sample and to estimate reliable black hole masses via their bulge luminosities. We present early results on the correlations between black hole mass and the relativistic jet parameters. Our preliminary results suggest that the more massive the black hole is, the faster and the more luminous jet it produces.
  • We have found that the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in Abell~85, Holm 15A, displays the largest core so far known. Its cusp radius, $r_{\gamma} = 4.57 \pm 0.06$ kpc ($4.26^{\prime\prime}\pm 0.06^{\prime\prime}$), is more than 18 times larger than the mean for BCGs, and $\geq1$ kpc larger than A2261-BCG, hitherto the largest-cored BCG (Postman, Lauer, Donahue, et al. 2012) Holm 15A hosts the luminous amorphous radio source 0039-095B and has the optical signature of a LINER. Scaling laws indicate that this core could host a supermassive black hole (SMBH) of mass $M_{\bullet}\thicksim (10^{9}-10^{11})\,M_{\odot}$. We suggest that cores this large represent a relatively short phase in the evolution of BCGs, whereas the masses of their associated SBMH might be set by initial conditions.
  • We present optical and near infrared (NIR) imaging data of the radio-loud Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H 0323+342, which shows intense and variable gamma-ray activity discovered by the Fermi satellite with the Large Area Telescope. NIR and optical images are used to investigate the structural properties of the host galaxy of 1H 0323+342; this together with optical spectroscopy allowed us to examine its black hole mass. Based on the 2D multiwavelength surface brightness modeling, we find that, statistically, the best model fit is a combination of a nuclear component and a S\'ersic profile (n~2.8). However, the presence of a disc component (with a small bulge n~1.2) remains also a possibility and cannot be ruled out with the present data. Although at first glance a spiral-arm like structure is revealed in our images, a 2D Fourier analysis of the imagery suggests that such structure corresponds to an asymmetric ring, likely associated to a recent violent dynamical interaction. We discuss our results on the context of relativistic jets production and galaxy evolution.