• We study the properties of 66 galaxies with kinematically misaligned gas and stars from MaNGA survey. The fraction of kinematically misaligned galaxies varies with galaxy physical parameters, i.e. M*, SFR and sSFR. According to their sSFR, we further classify these 66 galaxies into three categories, 10 star-forming, 26 "Green Valley" and 30 quiescent ones. The properties of different types of kinematically misaligned galaxies are different in that the star-forming ones have positive gradient in D4000 and higher gas-phase metallicity, while the green valley/quiescent ones have negative D4000 gradients and lower gas-phase metallicity on average. There is evidence that all types of the kinematically misaligned galaxies tend to live in more isolated environment. Based on all these observational results, we propose a scenario for the formation of star forming galaxies with kinematically misaligned gas and stars - the progenitor accretes misaligned gas from a gas-rich dwarf or cosmic web, the cancellation of angular momentum from gas-gas collisions between the pre-existing gas and the accreted gas largely accelerates gas inflow, leading to fast centrally-concentrated star-formation. The higher metallicity is due to enrichment from this star formation. For the kinematically misaligned green valley and quiescent galaxies, they might be formed through gas-poor progenitors accreting kinematically misaligned gas from satellites which are smaller in mass.
  • Recent observations have revealed that starburst galaxies can drive molecular gas outflows through stellar radiation pressure. Molecular gas is the phase of the interstellar medium from which stars form, so these outflows curtail stellar mass growth in galaxies. Previously known outflows, however, involve small fractions of the total molecular gas content and are restricted to sub-kiloparsec scales. It is also apparent that input from active galactic nuclei is in at least some cases dynamically important, so pure stellar feedback has been considered incapable of aggressively terminating star formation on galactic scales. Extraplanar molecular gas has been detected in the archetype starburst galaxy M82, but so far there has been no evidence that starbursts can propel significant quantities of cold molecular gas to the same galactocentric radius (~10 kpc) as the warmer gas traced by metal absorbers. Here we report observations of molecular gas in a compact (effective radius 100 pc) massive starburst galaxy at z=0.7, which is known to drive a fast outflow of ionized gas. We find that 35 per cent of the total molecular gas is spatially extended on a scale of approximately 10 kpc, and one third of this has a velocity of up to 1000 km/s. The kinetic energy associated with this high-velocity component is consistent with the momentum flux available from stellar radiation pressure. This result demonstrates that nuclear bursts of star formation are capable of ejecting large amounts of cold gas from the central regions of galaxies, thereby strongly affecting their evolution.
  • We investigate the process of rapid star formation quenching in a sample of 12 massive galaxies at intermediate redshift (z~0.6) that host high-velocity ionized gas outflows (v>1000 km/s). We conclude that these fast outflows are most likely driven by feedback from star formation rather than active galactic nuclei (AGN). We use multiwavelength survey and targeted observations of the galaxies to assess their star formation, AGN activity, and morphology. Common attributes include diffuse tidal features indicative of recent mergers accompanied by bright, unresolved cores with effective radii less than a few hundred parsecs. The galaxies are extraordinarily compact for their stellar mass, even when compared with galaxies at z~2-3. For 9/12 galaxies, we rule out an AGN contribution to the nuclear light and hypothesize that the unresolved core comes from a compact central starburst triggered by the dissipative collapse of very gas-rich progenitor merging disks. We find evidence of AGN activity in half the sample but we argue that it accounts for only a small fraction (<10%) of the total bolometric luminosity. We find no correlation between AGN activity and outflow velocity and we conclude that the fast outflows in our galaxies are not powered by on-going AGN activity, but rather by recent, extremely compact starbursts.
  • We report observations of the CO(2-1) emission of SDSSJ1506+54, a compact (r_e~135pc) starburst galaxy at z=0.6. SDSSJ1506+54 appears to be forming stars close to the limit allowed by stellar radiation pressure feedback models: the measured L_IR/L'_CO 1500 is one of the highest measured for any galaxy. With its compact optical morphology but extended low surface brightness envelope, post-starburst spectral features, high infrared luminosity (L_IR>10^12.5 L_Sun), low gas fraction (M_H2/M_stars~15%), and short gas depletion time (tens of Myr), we speculate that this is a feedback- limited central starburst episode at the conclusion of a major merger. Taken as such, SDSSJ1504+54 epitomizes the brief closing stage of a classic model of galaxy growth: we are witnessing a key component of spheroid formation during what we term a 'redline' starburst.
  • [abridged] We present multi-epoch high-resolution optical spectroscopy, UV/radio/X-ray imaging, and archival Hubble and Spitzer observations of an intermediate luminosity optical transient recently discovered in the nearby galaxy NGC300. We find that the transient (NGC300 OT2008-1) has a peak absolute magnitude of M_bol~-11.8 mag, intermediate between novae and supernovae, and similar to the recent events M85 OT2006-1 and SN2008S. Our high-resolution spectra, the first for this event, are dominated by intermediate velocity (~200-1000 km/s) hydrogen Balmer lines and CaII emission and absorption lines that point to a complex circumstellar environment, reminiscent of the yellow hypergiant IRC+10420. In particular, we detect broad CaII H&K absorption with an asymmetric red wing extending to ~1000 km/s, indicative of gas infall onto a massive and relatively compact star (blue supergiant or Wolf-Rayet star); an extended red supergiant progenitor is unlikely. The origin of the inflowing gas may be a previous ejection from the progenitor or the wind of a massive binary companion. The low luminosity, intermediate velocities, and overall similarity to a known eruptive star indicate that the event did not result in a complete disruption of the progenitor. We identify the progenitor in archival Spitzer observations, with deep upper limits from Hubble data. The spectral energy distribution points to a dust-enshrouded star with a luminosity of about 6x10^4 L_sun, indicative of a ~10-20 M_sun progenitor (or binary system). This conclusion is in good agreement with our interpretation of the outburst and circumstellar properties. The lack of significant extinction in the transient spectrum indicates that the dust surrounding the progenitor was cleared by the outburst.
  • We have cross-correlated X-ray catalogs derived from archival Chandra ACIS observations with a Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 2 (DR2) galaxy catalog to form a sample of 42 serendipitously X-ray detected galaxies over the redshift interval 0.03 < z < 0.25. This pilot study will help fill in the "redshift gap" between local X-ray-studied samples of normal galaxies and those in the deepest X-ray surveys. Our chief purpose is to compare optical spectroscopic diagnostics of activity (both star-formation and accretion) with X-ray properties of galaxies. Our work supports a normalization value of the X-ray-star-formation-rate (X-ray-SFR) correlation consistent with the lower values published in the literature. The difference is in the allocation of X-ray emission to high-mass X-ray binaries relative to other components such as hot gas, low-mass X-ray binaries, and/or AGN. We are able to quantify a few pitfalls in the use of lower-resolution, lower signal-to-noise optical spectroscopy to identify X-ray sources (as has necessarily been employed for many X-ray surveys). Notably, we find a few AGN that likely would have been misidentified as non-AGN sources in higher-redshift studies. However, we do not find any X-ray hard, highly X-ray-luminous galaxies lacking optical spectroscopic diagnostics of AGN activity. Such sources are members of the "X-ray Bright, Optically Normal Galaxy" (XBONG) class of AGN.
  • We utilize Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging and spectroscopy of ~53,000 star-forming galaxies at z~0.1 to study the relation between stellar mass and gas-phase metallicity. We derive gas-phase oxygen abundances and stellar masses using new techniques which make use of the latest stellar evolutionary synthesis and photoionization models. We find a tight (+/-0.1 dex) correlation between stellar mass and metallicity spanning over 3 orders of magnitude in stellar mass and a factor of 10 in metallicity. The relation is relatively steep from 10^{8.5} - 10^{10.5} M_sun, in good accord with known trends between luminosity and metallicity, but flattens above 10^{10.5} M_sun. We use indirect estimates of the gas mass based on the H-alpha luminosity to compare our data to predictions from simple closed box chemical evolution models. We show that metal loss is strongly anti-correlated with baryonic mass, with low mass dwarf galaxies being 5 times more metal-depleted than L* galaxies at z~0.1. Evidence for metal depletion is not confined to dwarf galaxies, but is found in galaxies with masses as high as 10^{10} M_sun. We interpret this as strong evidence both of the ubiquity of galactic winds and of their effectiveness in removing metals from galaxy potential wells.
  • We investigate the star formation history of both the bright star clusters and the diffuse `field star' population in the dwarf starburst galaxy NGC 5253 using STIS longslit ultraviolet spectroscopy. Our slit covers a physical area of 370 x 1.6 pc and includes 8 apparent clusters and several inter-cluster regions of diffuse light which we take to be the field. The diffuse light spectrum lacks the strong O-star wind features which are clearly visible in spectra of the brightest clusters. This discrepancy provides compelling evidence that the diffuse light is not reflected light from nearby clusters, but originates in a UV-bright field star population, and it raises the issue of whether the star formation process may be operating differently in the field than in clusters. We compare our spectra to STARBURST99 evolutionary synthesis models which incorporate a new low metallicity atlas of O-star spectra. We favor a scenario which accounts for the paucity of O-stars in the field without requiring the field to have a different IMF than the clusters: stellar clusters form continuously and then dissolve on ~10 Myr timescales and disperse their remaining stars into the field. We consider the probable contribution of an O-star deficient field population to the spatially unresolved spectra of high redshift galaxies. (Abridged)