• In order for the inflaton to decay into radiation at the end of inflation, it needs to couple to light matter fields. In this article we determine whether such couplings cause the inflaton to decay during inflation rather than after it. We calculate decay amplitudes during inflation, and determine to what extent such processes have an impact on the mean and variance of the inflaton, as well as on the expected energy density of its decay products. Although the exponential growth of the decay amplitudes with the number of e-folds appears to indicate the rapid decay of the inflaton, cancellations among different amplitudes and probabilities result in corrections to the different expectation values that only grow substantially when the number of e-folds is much larger than the inverse squared inflaton mass in units of the Hubble scale. Otherwise, for typical parameter choices, it is safe to assume that the inflaton does not decay during inflation.
  • Because the scale of inflation is conformal frame dependent, in order to fully characterize it one should quote its value in terms of all the independent equal-time dimensionless ratios in the theory. We argue that when couplings depend on the inflaton itself, one cannot calculate these ratios in terms of measurable quantities such as the tensor amplitude and the Planck mass at present. This uncertainty also becomes manifest when we try to express the (frame-dependent) inflationary scale in terms of masses that are measurable today. Although we can calculate inflationary scale in the Einstein frame in terms of today's Planck mass, we cannot do the same in the Jordan frame. There are thus grounds to claim that the tensor amplitude does not completely characterize the scale of inflation.
  • We study the growth of cosmic structure under the assumption that dark matter self-annihilates with an averaged cross section times relative velocity that grows with the scale factor, an increase known as Sommerfeld-enhancement. Such an evolution is expected in models in which a light force carrier in the dark sector enhances the annihilation cross section of dark matter particles, and has been invoked, for instance, to explain anomalies in cosmic ray spectra reported in the past. In order to make our results as general as possible, we assume that dark matter annihilates into a relativistic species that only interacts gravitationally with the standard model. This assumption also allows us to test whether the additional relativistic species mildly favored by cosmic-microwave background data could originate from dark matter annihilation. We do not find evidence for Sommerfeld-enhanced dark matter annihilation and derive the corresponding upper limits on the annihilation cross-section.
  • J.L. Hewett, H. Weerts, R. Brock, J.N. Butler, B.C.K. Casey, J. Collar, A. de Gouvea, R. Essig, Y. Grossman, W. Haxton, J.A. Jaros, C.K. Jung, Z.T. Lu, K. Pitts, Z. Ligeti, J.R. Patterson, M. Ramsey-Musolf, J.L. Ritchie, A. Roodman, K. Scholberg, C.E.M. Wagner, G.P. Zeller, S. Aefsky, A. Afanasev, K. Agashe, C. Albright, J. Alonso, C. Ankenbrandt, M. Aoki, C.A. Arguelles, N. Arkani-Hamed, J.R. Armendariz, C. Armendariz-Picon, E. Arrieta Diaz, J. Asaadi, D.M. Asner, K.S. Babu, K. Bailey, O. Baker, B. Balantekin, B. Baller, M. Bass, B. Batell, J. Beacham, J. Behr, N. Berger, M. Bergevin, E. Berman, R. Bernstein, A.J. Bevan, M. Bishai, M. Blanke, S. Blessing, A. Blondel, T. Blum, G. Bock, A. Bodek, G. Bonvicini, F. Bossi, J. Boyce, R. Breedon, M. Breidenbach, S.J. Brice, R.A. Briere, S. Brodsky, C. Bromberg, A. Bross, T.E. Browder, D.A. Bryman, M. Buckley, R. Burnstein, E. Caden, P. Campana, R. Carlini, G. Carosi, C. Castromonte, R. Cenci, I. Chakaberia, M.C. Chen, C.H. Cheng, B. Choudhary, N.H. Christ, E. Christensen, M.E. Christy, T.E. Chupp, E. Church, D.B. Cline, T.E. Coan, P. Coloma, J. Comfort, L. Coney, J. Cooper, R.J. Cooper, R. Cowan, D.F. Cowen, D. Cronin-Hennessy, A. Datta, G.S. Davies, M. Demarteau, D.P. DeMille, A. Denig, R. Dermisek, A. Deshpande, M.S. Dewey, R. Dharmapalan, J. Dhooghe, M.R. Dietrich, M. Diwan, Z. Djurcic, S. Dobbs, M. Duraisamy, B. Dutta, H. Duyang, D.A. Dwyer, M. Eads, B. Echenard, S.R. Elliott, C. Escobar, J. Fajans, S. Farooq, C. Faroughy, J.E. Fast, B. Feinberg, J. Felde, G. Feldman, P. Fierlinger, P. Fileviez Perez, B. Filippone, P. Fisher, B.T. Flemming, K.T. Flood, R. Forty, M.J. Frank, A. Freyberger, A. Friedland, R. Gandhi, K.S. Ganezer, A. Garcia, F.G. Garcia, S. Gardner, L. Garrison, A. Gasparian, S. Geer, V.M. Gehman, T. Gershon, M. Gilchriese, C. Ginsberg, I.Gogoladze, M. Gonderinger, M. Goodman, H. Gould, M. Graham, P.W. Graham, R. Gran, J. Grange, G. Gratta, J.P. Green, H. Greenlee, R.C. Group, E. Guardincerri, V. Gudkov, R. Guenette, A. Haas, A. Hahn, T. Han, T. Handler, J.C. Hardy, R. Harnik, D.A. Harris, F.A. Harris, P.G. Harris, J. Hartnett, B. He, B.R. Heckel, K.M. Heeger, S. Henderson, D. Hertzog, R. Hill, E.A Hinds, D.G. Hitlin, R.J. Holt, N. Holtkamp, G. Horton-Smith, P. Huber, W. Huelsnitz, J. Imber, I. Irastorza, J. Jaeckel, I. Jaegle, C. James, A. Jawahery, D. Jensen, C.P. Jessop, B. Jones, H. Jostlein, T. Junk, A.L. Kagan, M. Kalita, Y. Kamyshkov, D.M. Kaplan, G. Karagiorgi, A. Karle, T. Katori, B. Kayser, R. Kephart, S. Kettell, Y.K. Kim, M. Kirby, K. Kirch, J. Klein, J. Kneller, A. Kobach, M. Kohl, J. Kopp, M. Kordosky, W. Korsch, I. Kourbanis, A.D. Krisch, P. Krizan, A.S. Kronfeld, S. Kulkarni, K.S. Kumar, Y. Kuno, T. Kutter, T. Lachenmaier, M. Lamm, J. Lancaster, M. Lancaster, C. Lane, K. Lang, P. Langacker, S. Lazarevic, T. Le, K. Lee, K.T. Lesko, Y. Li, M. Lindgren, A. Lindner, J. Link, D. Lissauer, L.S. Littenberg, B. Littlejohn, C.Y. Liu, W. Loinaz, W. Lorenzon, W.C. Louis, J. Lozier, L. Ludovici, L. Lueking, C. Lunardini, D.B. MacFarlane, P.A.N. Machado, P.B. Mackenzie, J. Maloney, W.J. Marciano, W. Marsh, M. Marshak, J.W. Martin, C. Mauger, K.S. McFarland, C. McGrew, G. McLaughlin, D. McKeen, R. McKeown, B.T. Meadows, R. Mehdiyev, D. Melconian, H. Merkel, M. Messier, J.P. Miller, G. Mills, U.K. Minamisono, S.R. Mishra, I. Mocioiu, S. Moed Sher, R.N. Mohapatra, B. Monreal, C.D. Moore, J.G. Morfin, J. Mousseau, L.A. Moustakas, G. Mueller, P. Mueller, M. Muether, H.P. Mumm, C. Munger, H. Murayama, P. Nath, O. Naviliat-Cuncin, J.K. Nelson, D. Neuffer, J.S. Nico, A. Norman, D. Nygren, Y. Obayashi, T.P. O'Connor, Y. Okada, J. Olsen, L. Orozco, J.L. Orrell, J. Osta, B. Pahlka, J. Paley, V. Papadimitriou, M. Papucci, S. Parke, R.H. Parker, Z. Parsa, K. Partyka, A. Patch, J.C. Pati, R.B. Patterson, Z. Pavlovic, G. Paz, G.N. Perdue, D. Perevalov, G. Perez, R. Petti, W. Pettus, A. Piepke, M. Pivovaroff, R. Plunkett, C.C. Polly, M. Pospelov, R. Povey, A. Prakesh, M.V. Purohit, S. Raby, J.L. Raaf, R. Rajendran, S. Rajendran, G. Rameika, R. Ramsey, A. Rashed, B.N. Ratcliff, B. Rebel, J. Redondo, P. Reimer, D. Reitzner, F. Ringer, A. Ringwald, S. Riordan, B.L. Roberts, D.A. Roberts, R. Robertson, F. Robicheaux, M. Rominsky, R. Roser, J.L. Rosner, C. Rott, P. Rubin, N. Saito, M. Sanchez, S. Sarkar, H. Schellman, B. Schmidt, M. Schmitt, D.W. Schmitz, J. Schneps, A. Schopper, P. Schuster, A.J. Schwartz, M. Schwarz, J. Seeman, Y.K. Semertzidis, K.K. Seth, Q. Shafi, P. Shanahan, R. Sharma, S.R. Sharpe, M. Shiozawa, V. Shiltsev, K. Sigurdson, P. Sikivie, J. Singh, D. Sivers, T. Skwarnicki, N. Smith, J. Sobczyk, H. Sobel, M. Soderberg, Y.H. Song, A. Soni, P. Souder, A. Sousa, J. Spitz, M. Stancari, G.C. Stavenga, J.H. Steffen, S. Stepanyan, D. Stoeckinger, S. Stone, J. Strait, M. Strassler, I.A. Sulai, R. Sundrum, R. Svoboda, B. Szczerbinska, A. Szelc, T. Takeuchi, P. Tanedo, S. Taneja, J. Tang, D.B. Tanner, R. Tayloe, I. Taylor, J. Thomas, C. Thorn, X. Tian, B.G. Tice, M. Tobar, N. Tolich, N. Toro, I.S. Towner, Y. Tsai, R. Tschirhart, C.D. Tunnell, M. Tzanov, A. Upadhye, J. Urheim, S. Vahsen, A. Vainshtein, E. Valencia, R.G. Van de Water, R.S. Van de Water, M. Velasco, J. Vogel, P. Vogel, W. Vogelsang, Y.W. Wah, D. Walker, N. Weiner, A. Weltman, R. Wendell, W. Wester, M. Wetstein, C. White, L. Whitehead, J. Whitmore, E. Widmann, G. Wiedemann, J. Wilkerson, G. Wilkinson, P. Wilson, R.J. Wilson, W. Winter, M.B. Wise, J. Wodin, S. Wojcicki, B. Wojtsekhowski, T. Wongjirad, E. Worcester, J. Wurtele, T. Xin, J. Xu, T. Yamanaka, Y. Yamazaki, I. Yavin, J. Yeck, M. Yeh, M. Yokoyama, J. Yoo, A. Young, E. Zimmerman, K. Zioutas, M. Zisman, J. Zupan, R. Zwaska
    May 11, 2012 hep-ph, hep-ex
    The Proceedings of the 2011 workshop on Fundamental Physics at the Intensity Frontier. Science opportunities at the intensity frontier are identified and described in the areas of heavy quarks, charged leptons, neutrinos, proton decay, new light weakly-coupled particles, and nucleons, nuclei, and atoms.
  • A central assumption in our analysis of cosmic structure is that cosmological perturbations have zero ensemble mean. This property is one of the consequences of statistically homogeneity, the invariance of correlation functions under spatial translations. In this article we explore whether cosmological perturbations indeed have zero mean, and thus test one aspect of statistical homogeneity. We carry out a classical test of the zero mean hypothesis against a class of alternatives in which perturbations have non-vanishing means, but homogeneous and isotropic covariances. Apart from Gaussianity, our test does not make any additional assumptions about the nature of the perturbations and is thus rather generic and model-independent. The test statistic we employ is essentially Student's t statistic, applied to appropriately masked, foreground-cleaned cosmic microwave background anisotropy maps produced by the WMAP mission. We find evidence for a non-zero mean in a particular range of multipoles, but the evidence against the zero mean hypothesis goes away when we correct for multiple testing. We also place constraints on the mean of the temperature multipoles as a function of angular scale. On angular scales smaller than four degrees, a non-zero mean has to be at least an order of magnitude smaller than the standard deviation of the temperature anisotropies.
  • It is often assumed that primordial perturbations are statistically isotropic, which implies, among other properties, that their power spectrum is invariant under rotations. In this article, we test this assumption by placing model-independent bounds on deviations from rotational invariance of the primordial spectrum. Using five-year WMAP cosmic microwave anisotropy maps, we set limits on the overall norm and the amplitude of individual components of the primordial spectrum quadrupole. We find that there is no significant evidence for primordial isotropy breaking, and that an eventually non-vanishing quadrupole has to be subdominant.
  • In almost all structure formation models, primordial perturbations are created within a homogeneous and isotropic universe, like the one we observe. Because their ensemble averages inherit the symmetries of the spacetime in which they are seeded, cosmological perturbations then happen to be statistically isotropic and homogeneous. Certain anomalies in the cosmic microwave background on the other hand suggest that perturbations do not satisfy these statistical properties, thereby challenging perhaps our understanding of structure formation. In this article we relax this tension. We show that if the universe contains an appropriate triad of scalar fields with spatially constant but non-zero gradients, it is possible to generate statistically anisotropic and inhomogeneous primordial perturbations, even though the energy momentum tensor of the triad itself is invariant under translations and rotations.
  • In order to calculate the power spectrum generated during a stage of inflation, we have to specify the quantum state of the inflaton perturbations, which is conventionally assumed to be the Bunch-Davies vacuum. We argue that this choice is justified only if the interactions of cosmological perturbations are strong enough to drive excited states toward the vacuum. We quantify this efficiency by calculating the decay probabilities of excited states to leading order in the slow-roll expansion in canonical single-field inflationary models. These probabilities are suppressed by a slow-roll parameter and the squared Planck mass, and enhanced by ultraviolet and infrared cut-offs. For natural choices of these scales decays are unlikely, and, hence, the choice of the Bunch-Davies vacuum as the state of the primordial perturbations does not appear to be warranted.
  • We describe a novel mechanism to seed a nearly scale invariant spectrum of adiabatic perturbations during a non-inflationary stage. It relies on a modified dispersion relation that contains higher powers of the spatial momentum of matter perturbations. We implement this idea in the context of a massless scalar field in an otherwise perfectly homogeneous universe. The couplings of the field to background scalars and tensors give rise to the required modification of its dispersion relation, and the couplings of the scalar to matter result in an adiabatic primordial spectrum. This work is meant to explicitly illustrate that it is possible to seed nearly scale invariant primordial spectra without inflation, within a conventional expansion history.
  • We propose and develop a formalism to describe and constrain statistically anisotropic primordial perturbations. Starting from a decomposition of the primordial power spectrum in spherical harmonics, we find how the temperature fluctuations observed in the CMB sky are directly related to the coefficients in this harmonic expansion. Although the angular power spectrum does not discriminate between statistically isotropic and anisotropic perturbations, it is possible to define analogous quadratic estimators that are direct measures of statistical anisotropy. As a simple illustration of our formalism we test for the existence of a preferred direction in the primordial perturbations using full-sky CMB maps. We do not find significant evidence supporting the existence of a dipole component in the primordial spectrum.
  • We study gravitationally bound static and spherically symmetric configurations of k-essence fields. In particular, we investigate whether these configurations can reproduce the properties of dark matter haloes. The classes of Lagrangians we consider lead to non-isotropic fluids with barotropic and polytropic equations of state. The latter include microscopic realizations of the often-considered Chaplygin gases, which we find can cluster into dark matter halo-like objects with flat rotation curves, while exhibiting a dark energy-like negative pressure on cosmological scales. We complement our studies with a series of formal general results about the stability and initial value formulation of non-canonical scalar field theories, and we also discuss a new class of de Sitter solutions with spacelike field gradients.
  • In this paper I explore whether a vector field can be the origin of the present stage of cosmic acceleration. In order to avoid violations of isotropy, the vector has be part of a ``cosmic triad'', that is, a set of three identical vectors pointing in mutually orthogonal spatial directions. A triad is indeed able to drive a stage of late accelerated expansion in the universe, and there exist tracking attractors that render cosmic evolution insensitive to initial conditions. However, as in most other models, the onset of cosmic acceleration is determined by a parameter that has to be tuned to reproduce current observations. The triad equation of state can be sufficiently close to minus one today, and for tachyonic models it might be even less than that. I briefly analyze linear cosmological perturbation theory in the presence of a triad. It turns out that the existence of non-vanishing spatial vectors invalidates the decomposition theorem, i.e. scalar, vector and tensor perturbations do not decouple from each other. In a simplified case it is possible to analytically study the stability of the triad along the different cosmological attractors. The triad is classically stable during inflation, radiation and matter domination, but it is unstable during (late-time) cosmic acceleration. I argue that this instability is not likely to have a significant impact at present.
  • If the inflaton decays into several components during reheating, and if the corresponding decay rates are functions of spacetime-dependent quantities, it is possible to generate entropy perturbations after a stage of single-field inflation. In this paper, I present a simple toy example that illustrates this possibility. In the example, the decay rates of the inflaton into ``matter'' and ``radiation'' are different functions of the total energy density. In particular cases, one can exactly solve the equations of motion both for background and perturbations in the long-wavelength limit, and show that entropy perturbations do indeed arise. Beyond these specific examples, I attempt to identify what are the essential ingredients responsible for the generation of entropy perturbations after single-field inflation, and to what extent these elements are expected to be present in realistic models.
  • I discuss a mechanism that renders the spectral index of the primordial spectrum and the inflationary stage independent of each other. If a scalar field acquires an appropriate time-dependent mass, it is possible to generate an adiabatic, Gaussian scale invariant spectrum of density perturbations during any stage of inflation. As an illustration, I present a simple model where the time-dependent mass arises from the coupling of the inflaton to a second scalar. The mechanism I propose might help to implement a successful inflationary scenario in particle physics theories that do not yield slow-roll potentials.
  • We propose a new alternative mechanism to seed a scale invariant spectrum of primordial density perturbations that does not rely on inflation. In our scenario, a perfect fluid dominates the early stages of an expanding, non-inflating universe. Because the speed of sound of the fluid decays, perturbations are left frozen behind the sound horizon, with a spectral index that depends on the fluid equation of state. We explore here a toy model that realizes this idea. Although the model can explain an adiabatic, Gaussian, scale invariant spectrum of primordial perturbations, it turns out that in its simplest form it cannot account for the observed amplitude of the primordial density perturbations.
  • In the context of (4+d)-dimensional general relativity, we propose an inflationary scenario wherein 3 spatial dimensions grow large, while d extra dimensions remain small. Our model requires that a self-interacting d-form acquire a vacuum expectation value along the extra dimensions. This causes 3 spatial dimensions to inflate, whilst keeping the size of the extra dimensions nearly constant. We do not require an additional stabilization mechanism for the radion, as stable solutions exist for flat, and for negatively curved compact extra dimensions. From a four-dimensional perspective, the radion does not couple to the inflaton; and, the small amplitude of the CMB temperature anisotropies arises from an exponential suppression of fluctuations, due to the higher-dimensional origin of the inflaton. The mechanism triggering the end of inflation is responsible, both, for heating the universe, and for avoiding violations of the equivalence principle due to coupling between the radion and matter.
  • In the presence of a short-distance cutoff, the choice of a vacuum state in an inflating, non-de Sitter universe is unavoidably ambiguous. The ambiguity is related to the time at which initial conditions for the mode functions are specified and to the way the expansion of the universe affects those initial conditions. In this paper we study the imprint of these uncertainties on the predictions of inflation. We parametrize the most general set of possible vacuum initial conditions by two phenomenological variables. We find that the generated power spectrum receives oscillatory corrections whose amplitude is proportional to the Hubble parameter over the cutoff scale. In order to further constrain the phenomenological parameters that characterize the vacuum definition, we study gravitational particle production during different cosmological epochs.
  • We consider toy cosmological models in which a classical, homogeneous, spinor field provides a dominant or sub-dominant contribution to the energy-momentum tensor of a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe. We find that, if such a field were to exist, appropriate choices of the spinor self-interaction would generate a rich variety of behaviors, quite different from their widely studied scalar field counterparts. We first discuss solutions that incorporate a stage of cosmic inflation and estimate the primordial spectrum of density perturbations seeded during such a stage. Inflation driven by a spinor field turns out to be unappealing as it leads to a blue spectrum of perturbations and requires considerable fine-tuning of parameters. We next find that, for simple, quartic spinor self-interactions, non-singular cyclic cosmologies exist with reasonable parameter choices. These solutions might eventually be incorporated into a successful past- and future-eternal cosmological model free of singularities. In an Appendix, we discuss the classical treatment of spinors and argue that certain quantum systems might be approximated in terms of such fields.
  • We consider a toy universe containing conventional matter and an additional real scalar field, and discuss how the requirements of gauge and diffeomorphism invariance essentially single out a particular set of theories which might describe such a world at low energies. In these theories, fermion masses and g-factors, as well as the electromagnetic coupling turn to be scalar field dependent; fermion charges and the gravitational coupling might be assumed to be constant. We then proceed to study the impact of a time variation of the scalar field on measurements of atomic spectra at high redshifts. Light propagation is not affected by a sufficiently slow change of the fine structure constant, but changes of the latter as well as variations of fermion masses and g-factors do affect the observed atomic spectra. Finally, we prove the independence of these predictions on the chosen conformal frame, in a further attempt to address differing views about the subject expressed in the literature.
  • It is known that Lorentzian wormholes must be threaded by matter that violates the null energy condition. We phenomenologically characterize such exotic matter by a general class of microscopic scalar field Lagrangians and formulate the necessary conditions that the existence of Lorentzian wormholes imposes on them. Under rather general assumptions, these conditions turn out to be strongly restrictive. The most simple Lagrangian that satisfies all of them describes a minimally coupled massless scalar field with a reversed sign kinetic term. Exact, non-singular, spherically symmetric solutions of Einstein's equations sourced by such a field indeed describe traversable wormhole geometries. These wormholes are characterized by two parameters: their mass and charge. Among them, the zero mass ones are particularly simple, allowing us to analytically prove their stability under arbitrary space-time dependent perturbations. We extend our arguments to non-zero mass solutions and conclude that at least a non-zero measure set of these solutions is stable.
  • Quintessence, a time-varying energy component that may account for the accelerated expansion of the universe, can be characterized by its equation of state and sound speed. In this paper, we show that if the quintessence density is at least one percent of the critical density at the surface of last scattering the cosmic microwave background anisotropy can distinguish between models whose sound speed is near the speed of light versus near zero, which could be useful in distinguishing competing candidates for dark energy.
  • We recently introduced the concept of "k-essence" as a dynamical solution for explaining naturally why the universe has entered an epoch of accelerated expansion at a late stage of its evolution. The solution avoids fine-tuning of parameters and anthropic arguments. Instead, k-essence is based on the idea of a dynamical attractor solution which causes it to act as a cosmological constant only at the onset of matter-domination. Consequently, k-essence overtakes the matter density and induces cosmic acceleration at about the present epoch. In this paper, we present the basic theory of k-essence and dynamical attractors based on evolving scalar fields with non-linear kinetic energy terms in the action. We present guidelines for constructing concrete examples and show that there are two classes of solutions, one in which cosmic acceleration continues forever and one in which the acceleration has finite duration.
  • Increasing evidence suggests that most of the energy density of the universe consists of a dark energy component with negative pressure, a ``cosmological constant" that causes the cosmic expansion to accelerate. In this paper, we address the puzzle of why this component comes to dominate the universe only recently rather than at some much earlier epoch. We present a class of theories based on an evolving scalar field where the explanation is based entirely on internal dynamical properties of the solutions. In the theories we consider, the dynamics causes the scalar field to lock automatically into a negative pressure state at the onset of matter-domination such that the present epoch is the earliest possible time, consistent with nucleosynthesis restrictions, when it can start to dominate.
  • It is shown that a large class of higher-order (i.e. non-quadratic) scalar kinetic terms can, without the help of potential terms, drive an inflationary evolution starting from rather generic initial conditions. In many models, this kinetically driven inflation (or "k-inflation" for short) rolls slowly from a high-curvature initial phase, down to a low-curvature phase and can exit inflation to end up being radiation-dominated, in a naturally graceful manner. We hope that this novel inflation mechanism might be useful in suggesting new ways of reconciling the string dilaton with inflation.