• We present Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) observations of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1 during the early mission phase in 2017. With the high spectral sensitivity and low-energy X-ray passband of NICER, we are able to detect the Fe L line complex in addition to the signature broad, asymmetric Fe K line. We confirm the presence of these lines by comparing the NICER data to archival observations with XMM-Newton/RGS and NuSTAR. Both features originate close to the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO). When modeling the lines with the relativistic line model RELLINE, we find the Fe L blend requires an inner disk radius of $1.4_{-0.1}^{+0.2}$ $R_{\mathrm{ISCO}}$ and Fe K is at $1.03_{-0.03}^{+0.13}$ $R_{\mathrm{ISCO}}$ (errors quoted at 90%). This corresponds to a position of $17.3_{-1.2}^{+2.5}$ km and $12.7_{-0.4}^{+1.6}$ km for a canonical neutron star mass ($M_{\mathrm{NS}}=1.4\ M_{\odot}$) and dimensionless spin value of $a=0$. Additionally, we employ a new version of the RELXILL model tailored for neutron stars and determine that these features arise from a dense disk and supersolar Fe abundance.
  • Hot, Dust-Obscured Galaxies (Hot DOGs), selected from the WISE all sky infrared survey, host some of the most powerful Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) known, and might represent an important stage in the evolution of galaxies. Most known Hot DOGs are at $z> 1.5$, due in part to a strong bias against identifying them at lower redshift related to the selection criteria. We present a new selection method that identifies 153 Hot DOG candidates at $z\sim 1$, where they are significantly brighter and easier to study. We validate this approach by measuring a redshift $z=1.009$, and an SED similar to higher redshift Hot DOGs for one of these objects, WISE J1036+0449 ($L_{\rm\,Bol}\simeq 8\times 10^{46}\rm\,erg\,s^{-1}$), using data from Keck/LRIS and NIRSPEC, SDSS, and CSO. We find evidence of a broadened component in MgII, which, if due to the gravitational potential of the supermassive black hole, would imply a black hole mass of $M_{\rm\,BH}\simeq 2 \times 10^8 M_{\odot}$, and an Eddington ratio of $\lambda_{\rm\,Edd}\simeq 2.7$. WISE J1036+0449 is the first Hot DOG detected by NuSTAR, and the observations show that the source is heavily obscured, with a column density of $N_{\rm\,H}\simeq(2-15)\times10^{23}\rm\,cm^{-2}$. The source has an intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosity of $\sim 6\times 10^{44}\rm\,erg\,s^{-1}$, a value significantly lower than that expected from the mid-infrared/X-ray correlation. We also find that the other Hot DOGs observed by X-ray facilities show a similar deficiency of X-ray flux. We discuss the origin of the X-ray weakness and the absorption properties of Hot DOGs. Hot DOGs at $z\lesssim1$ could be excellent laboratories to probe the characteristics of the accretion flow and of the X-ray emitting plasma at extreme values of the Eddington ratio.
  • We present the results of five NuSTAR observations of the type 2 active galactic nucleus (AGN) in IC 751, three of which were performed simultaneously with XMM-Newton or Swift/XRT. We find that the nuclear X-ray source underwent a clear transition from a Compton-thick ($N_{\rm\,H}\simeq 2\times 10^{24}\rm\,cm^{-2}$) to a Compton-thin ($N_{\rm\,H}\simeq 4\times 10^{23}\rm\,cm^{-2}$) state on timescales of $\lesssim 3$ months, which makes IC 751 the first changing-look AGN discovered by NuSTAR. Changes of the line-of-sight column density at a $\sim2\sigma$ level are also found on a time-scale of $\sim 48$ hours ($\Delta N_{\rm\,H}\sim 10^{23}\rm\,cm^{-2}$). From the lack of spectral variability on timescales of $\sim 100$ ks we infer that the varying absorber is located beyond the emission-weighted average radius of the broad-line region, and could therefore be related either to the external part of the broad-line region or a clumpy molecular torus. By adopting a physical torus X-ray spectral model, we are able to disentangle the column density of the non-varying absorber ($N_{\rm\,H}\sim 3.8\times 10^{23}\rm\,cm^{-2}$) from that of the varying clouds [$N_{\rm\,H}\sim(1-150)\times10^{22}\rm\,cm^{-2}$], and to constrain that of the material responsible for the reprocessed X-ray radiation ($N_{\rm\,H} \sim 6 \times 10^{24}\rm\,cm^{-2}$). We find evidence of significant intrinsic X-ray variability, with the flux varying by a factor of five on timescales of a few months in the 2-10 and 10-50 keV band.
  • We present X-ray spectral analyses for three Seyfert 2 active galactic nuclei, NGC 424, NGC 1320, and IC 2560, observed by NuSTAR in the 3-79 keV band. The high quality hard X-ray spectra allow detailed modeling of the Compton reflection component for the first time in these sources. Using quasi-simultaneous NuSTAR and Swift/XRT data, as well as archival XMM-Newton data, we find that all three nuclei are obscured by Compton-thick material with column densities in excess of ~5 x $10^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$, and that their X-ray spectra above 3 keV are dominated by reflection of the intrinsic continuum on Compton-thick material. Due to the very high obscuration, absorbed intrinsic continuum components are not formally required by the data in any of the sources. We constrain the intrinsic photon indices and the column density of the reflecting medium through the shape of the reflection spectra. Using archival multi-wavelength data we recover the intrinsic X-ray luminosities consistent with the broadband spectral energy distributions. Our results are consistent with the reflecting medium being an edge-on clumpy torus with a relatively large global covering factor and overall reflection efficiency of the order of 1%. Given the unambiguous confirmation of the Compton-thick nature of the sources, we investigate whether similar sources are likely to be missed by commonly used selection criteria for Compton-thick AGN, and explore the possibility of finding their high-redshift counterparts.
  • We present the X-ray timing and spectral evolution of the Galactic Center magnetar SGR J1745-2900 for the first ~4 months post-discovery using data obtained with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR)} and Swift observatories. Our timing analysis reveals a large increase in the magnetar spin-down rate by a factor of 2.60 +/- 0.07 over our data span. We further show that the change in spin evolution was likely coincident with a bright X-ray burst observed in 2013 June by Swift, and if so, there was no accompanying discontinuity in the frequency. We find that the source 3-10 keV flux has declined monotonically by a factor of ~2 over an 80-day period post-outburst accompanied by a ~20% decrease in the source's blackbody temperature, although there is evidence for both flux and kT having levelled off. We argue that the torque variations are likely to be magnetospheric in nature and will dominate over any dynamical signatures of orbital motion around Sgr A*.
  • We present the catalog of sources detected in 70 months of observations of the BAT hard X-ray detector on the Swift gamma-ray burst observatory. The Swift-BAT 70 month survey has detected 1171 hard X-ray sources (more than twice as many sources as the previous 22 month survey) in the 14-195 keV band down to a significance level of 4.8 sigma, associated with 1210 counterparts. The 70 month Swift-BAT survey is the most sensitive and uniform hard X-ray all-sky survey and reaches a flux level of 1.03e-11 ergs/sec/cm2 over 50% of the sky and 1.34e-11 ergs/sec/cm2 over 90% of the sky. The majority of new sources in the 70 month survey continue to be AGN, with over 700 in the 70 month survey catalog. As part of this new edition of the Swift-BAT catalog, we also make available 8-channel spectra and monthly-sampled lightcurves for each object detected in the survey at the Swift-BAT 70 month website.
  • We present the second Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalog of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which contains 476 bursts detected by the BAT between 2004 December 19 and 2009 December 21. This catalog (hereafter the BAT2 catalog) presents burst trigger time, location, 90% error radius, duration, fluence, peak flux, time-averaged spectral parameters and time-resolved spectral parameters measured by the BAT. In the correlation study of various observed parameters extracted from the BAT prompt emission data, we distinguish among long-duration GRBs (L-GRBs), short-duration GRBs (S-GRBs), and short-duration GRBs with extended emission (S-GRBs with E.E.) to investigate differences in the prompt emission properties. The fraction of L-GRBs, S-GRBs and S-GRBs with E.E. in the catalog are 89%, 8% and 2% respectively. We compare the BAT prompt emission properties with the BATSE, BeppoSAX and HETE-2 GRB samples. We also correlate the observed prompt emission properties with the redshifts for the GRBs with known redshift. The BAT T90 and T50 durations peak at 70 s and 30 s, respectively. We confirm that the spectra of the BAT S-GRBs are generally harder than those of the L-GRBs. The time-averaged spectra of the BAT S-GRBs with E.E. are similar to those of the L-GRBs. Whereas, the spectra of the initial short spikes of the S-GRBs with E.E. are similar to those of the S-GRBs. We show that the BAT GRB samples are significantly softer than the BATSE bright GRBs, and that the time-averaged Epeak of the BAT GRBs peaks at 80 keV which is significantly lower energy than those of the BATSE sample which peak at 320 keV. The time-averaged spectral properties of the BAT GRB sample are similar to those of the HETE-2 GRB samples. By time-resolved spectral analysis, we find that only 10% of the BAT observed photon indices are outside the allowed region of the synchrotron shock model.
  • We report on the discovery by the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer of the black hole candidate Swift J1539.2-6227 and the subsequent course of an outburst beginning in November 2008 and lasting at least seven months. The source was discovered during normal observations with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on 2008 November 25. An extended observing campaign with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and Swift provided near-daily coverage over 176 days, giving us a good opportunity to track the evolution of spectral and timing parameters with fine temporal resolution through a series of spectral states. The source was first detected in a hard state during which strong low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) were detected. The QPOs persisted for about 35 days and a signature of the transition from the hard to soft intermediate states was seen in the timing data. The source entered a short-lived thermal state about 40 days after the start of the outburst. There were variations in spectral hardness as the source flux declined and returned to a hard state at the end of the outburst. The progression of spectral states and the nature of the timing features provide strong evidence that Swift J1539.2-6227 is a candidate black hole in a low-mass X-ray binary system.
  • We present results from Swift, XMM-Newton, and deep INTEGRAL monitoring in the region of GRB 050925. This short Swift burst is a candidate for a newly discovered soft gamma-ray repeater (SGR) with the following observational burst properties: 1) galactic plane (b=-0.1 deg) localization, 2) 150 msec duration, and 3) a blackbody rather than a simple power-law spectral shape (with a significance level of 97%). We found two possible X-ray counterparts of GRB 050925 by comparing the X-ray images from Swift XRT and XMM-Newton. Both X-ray sources show the transient behavior with a power-law decay index shallower than -1. We found no hard X-ray emission nor any additional burst from the location of GRB 050925 in ~5 Ms of INTEGRAL data. We discuss about the three BATSE short bursts which might be associated with GRB 050925, based on their location and the duration. Assuming GRB 050925 is associated with the H II regions (W 58) at the galactic longitude of l=70 deg, we also discuss the source frame properties of GRB 050925.
  • We report the discovery of burst oscillations at the spin frequency in ten thermonuclear bursts from the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar (AMXP) IGR J17511-3057. The burst oscillation properties are, like those from the persistent AMXPs SAX J1808.4-3658 and XTE J1814-338, anomalous compared to burst oscillations from intermittent pulsars or non-pulsing LMXBs. Like SAX J1808.4-3658 they show frequency drifts in the rising phase rather than the tail. There is also evidence for harmonic content. Where IGR J17511-3057 is unusual compared to the other two persistent pulsars is that oscillations are not detected throughout all bursts. As accretion rate drops the bursts get brighter and their rise/decay time scales become shorter, while the oscillation amplitude falls below the detection threshold: first in the burst peak and then also in the rise. None of the bursts from IGR J17511-3057 show evidence for photospheric radius expansion (which might be expected to suppress oscillation amplitude) which allow us to set an upper limit to the distance of 6.9 kpc. We discuss the implications of our results for models of the burst oscillation mechanism.
  • We report the discovery of X-ray eclipses in the recently discovered accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar Swift J1749.4-2807. This is the first detection of X-ray eclipses in a system of this type and should enable a precise neutron star mass measurement once the companion star is identified and studied. We present a combined pulse and eclipse timing solution that enables tight constraints on the orbital parameters and inclination and shows that the companion mass is in the range 0.6-0.8 M_sun for a likely range of neutron star masses, and that it is larger than a main sequence star of the same mass. We observed two individual eclipse egresses and a single ingress. Our timing model shows that the eclipse features are symmetric about the time of 90 deg longitude from the ascending node, as expected. Our eclipse timing solution gives an eclipse duration (from the mid-points of ingress to egress) of 2172 +/- 13 s. This represents 6.85% of the 8.82 hr orbital period. This system also presents a potential measurement of "Shapiro" delay due to General Relativity; through this technique alone, we set an upper limit to the companion mass of 2.2 M_sun.
  • We have identified a new transient luminous low-mass X-ray binary, NGC 6440 X-2, with Chandra/ACIS, RXTE/PCA, and Swift/XRT observations of the globular cluster NGC 6440. The discovery outburst (July 28-31, 2009) peaked at L_X~1.5*10^36 ergs/s, and lasted for <4 days above L_X=10^35 ergs/s. Four other outbursts (May 29-June 4, Aug. 29-Sept. 1, Oct. 1-3, and Oct. 28-31 2009) have been observed with RXTE/PCA (identifying millisecond pulsations, Altamirano et al. 2009a) and Swift/XRT (confirming a positional association with NGC 6440 X-2), with similar peak luminosities and decay times. Optical and infrared imaging did not detect a clear counterpart, with best limits of V>21, B>22 in quiescence from archival HST imaging, g'>22 during the August outburst from Gemini-South GMOS imaging, and J>~18.5$ and K>~17 during the July outburst from CTIO 4-m ISPI imaging. Archival Chandra X-ray images of the core do not detect the quiescent counterpart, and place a bolometric luminosity limit of L_{NS}< 6*10^31 ergs/s (one of the lowest measured) for a hydrogen atmosphere neutron star. A short Chandra observation 10 days into quiescence found two photons at NGC 6440 X-2's position, suggesting enhanced quiescent emission at L_X~6*10^31 ergs/s . NGC 6440 X-2 currently shows the shortest recurrence time (~31 days) of any known X-ray transient, although regular outbursts were not visible in the bulge scans before early 2009. Fast, low-luminosity transients like NGC 6440 X-2 may be easily missed by current X-ray monitoring.
  • We present the catalog of sources detected in the first 22 months of data from the hard X-ray survey (14--195 keV) conducted with the BAT coded mask imager on the \swift satellite. The catalog contains 461 sources detected above the 4.8 sigma level with BAT. High angular resolution X-ray data for every source from Swift XRT or archival data have allowed associations to be made with known counterparts in other wavelength bands for over 97% of the detections, including the discovery of ~30 galaxies previously unknown as AGN and several new Galactic sources. A total of 266 of the sources are associated with Seyfert galaxies (median redshift z ~ 0.03) or blazars, with the majority of the remaining sources associated with X-ray binaries in our Galaxy. This ongoing survey is the first uniform all sky hard X-ray survey since HEAO-1 in 1977. Since the publication of the 9-month BAT survey we have increased the number of energy channels from 4 to 8 and have substantially increased the number of sources with accurate average spectra. The BAT 22-month catalog is the product of the most sensitive all-sky survey in the hard X-ray band, with a detection sensitivity (4.8 sigma) of 2.2e-11 erg/cm2/s (1 mCrab) over most of the sky in the 14--195 keV band.
  • The Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer has observed five outbursts from the transient 2.5 ms accretion-powered pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658 during 1998-2008. We present a pulse timing study of the most recent outburst and compare it with the previous timing solutions. The spin frequency of the source continues to decrease at a rate of (-5.5+/-1.2)x10^-18 Hz/s, which is consistent with the previously determined spin derivative. The spin-down occurs mostly during quiescence, and it is most likely due to the magnetic dipole torque from a B = 1.5x10^8 G dipolar field at the neutron star surface. We also find that the 2 hr binary orbital period is increasing at a rate of (3.80+/-0.06)x10^-12 s/s, also consistent with previous measurements. It remains uncertain whether this orbital change reflects secular evolution or short-term variability.
  • The X-ray emission from most accreting white dwarfs (WDs) in symbiotic binary stars is quite soft. Several symbiotic WDs, however, produce strong X-ray emission at energies greater than ~20 keV. The Swift BAT instrument has detected hard X-ray emission from 4 such accreting WDs in symbiotic stars: RT Cru, T CrB, CD -57 3057, and CH Cyg. In one case (RT Cru), Swift detected X-rays out to greater than 50 keV at a > 5 sigma confidence level. Combining data from the XRT and BAT detectors, we find that the 0.3-150 keV spectra of RT Cru, T CrB, and CD -57 3057 are well described by emission from a single-temperature, optically thin thermal plasma, plus an unresolved 6.4-6.9 keV Fe line complex. The X-ray spectrum of CH Cyg contains an additional bright soft component. For all 4 systems, the spectra suffer high levels of absorption from material that both fully and partially covers the source of hard X-rays. The XRT data did not show any of the rapid, periodic variations that one would expect if the X-ray emission were due to accretion onto a rotating, highly magnetized WD. The X-rays were thus more likely from the accretion-disk boundary layer around a massive, non-magnetic WD in each binary. The X-ray emission from RT Cru varied on timescales of a few days. This variability is consistent with being due to changes in the absorber that partially covers the source, suggesting localized absorption from a clumpy medium moving into the line of sight. The X-ray emission from CD -57 3057 and T CrB also varied during the 9 months of Swift observations, in a manner that was also consistent with variable absorption.
  • We present the results of our study of the variability time scales of a sample of 27 long Swift Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) with known redshifts. The variability time scale can help our understanding of fundamental GRB parameters such as the initial bulk Lorentz factor and the characteristic size associated with the emission region. Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) techniques were used to extract a noise threshold crossing frequency, which we associate with a variability time scale. The threshold frequency appears to show a correlation with the peak isotropic luminosity of GRBs.
  • We report a correlation based on a spectral simulation study of the prompt emission spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). The correlation is between the Epeak energy, which is the peak energy in the \nu F_\nu spectrum, and the photon index (\Gamma) derived from a simple power-law model. The Epeak - \Gamma relation, assuming the typical smoothly broken power-law spectrum of GRBs, is \log Epeak = 3.258 - 0.829\Gamma (1.3 < \Gamma < 2.3). We take into account not only a range of Epeak energies and fluences, but also distributions for both the low-energy photon index and the high-energy photon index in the smoothly broken power-law model. The distribution of burst durations in the BAT GRB sample is also included in the simulation. Our correlation is consistent with the index observed by BAT and Epeak measured by the BAT, and by other GRB instruments. Since about 85% of GRBs observed by the BAT are acceptably fit with the simple power-law model because of the relatively narrow energy range of the BAT, this relationship can be used to estimate Epeak when it is located within the BAT energy range.
  • We use Swift/BAT Earth occultation data at different geomagnetic latitudes to derive a sensitive measurement of the Cosmic X-ray background (CXB) and of the Earth albedo emission in the 15--200 keV band. We compare our CXB spectrum with recent (INTEGRAL, BeppoSAX) and past results (HEAO-1) and find good agreement. Using an independent measurement of the CXB spectrum we are able to confirm our results. This study shows that the BAT CXB spectrum has a normalization ~8(+/-3)% larger than the HEAO-1 measurement. The BAT accurate Earth albedo spectrum can be used to predict the level of photon background for satellites in low Earth and mid inclination orbits.
  • We present the results of the analysis of the first 9 months of data of the Swift BAT survey of AGN in the 14-195 keV band. Using archival X-ray data or follow-up Swift XRT observations, we have identified 129 (103 AGN) of 130 objects detected at |b|> 15 deg and with significance >4.8 sigma. One source remains unidentified. These same X-ray data have allowed measurement of the X-ray properties of the objects. We fit a power law to the log N - log S distribution, and find the slope to be 1.42+/-0.14. Characterizing the differential luminosity function data as a broken power law, we find a break luminosity log L_*(erg/s) = 43.85+/-0.26, a low luminosity power law slope a=0.84^{+0.16}_{-0.22}, and a high luminosity power law slope b=2.55^{+0.43}_{-0.30}, similar to the values that have been reported based on INTEGRAL data. We obtain a mean photon index 1.98 in the 14-195 keV band, with an rms spread of 0.27. Integration of our luminosity function gives a local volume density of AGN above 10^{41} erg/s of 2.4x10^{-3}/Mpc^3, which is about 10% of the total luminous local galaxy density above M_*=-19.75. We have obtained X-ray spectra from the literature and from Swift XRT follow-up observations. These show that the distribution of log n_H is essentially flat from n_H=10^{20}/cm^{2} to 10^{24}/cm^2, with 50% of the objects having column densities of less than 10^{22}/cm^{2}. BAT Seyfert galaxies have a median redshift of 0.03, a maximum log luminosity of 45.1, and approximately half have log n_H > 22.
  • We describe and discuss the spectral and temporal characteristics of the prompt emission and X-ray afterglow emission of X-ray flashes (XRFs) and X-ray-rich gamma-ray bursts (XRRs) detected and observed by Swift between December 2004 and September 2006. We compare these characteristics to a sample of conventional classical gamma-ray bursts (C-GRBs) observed during the same period. We confirm the correlation between Epeak_obs and fluence noted by others and find further evidence that XRFs, XRRs and C-GRBs form a continuum. We also confirm that our known redshift sample is consistent with the correlation between the peak energy in the GRB rest frame (Epeak_src) and the isotropic radiated energy (Eiso), so called the Epeak_src-Eiso relation. The spectral properties of X-ray afterglows of XRFs and C-GRBs are similar, but the temporal properties of XRFs and C-GRBs are quite different. We found that the light curves of C-GRB afterglows show a break to steeper indices (shallow-to-steep break) at much earlier times than do XRF afterglows. Moreover, the overall luminosity of XRF X-ray afterglows is systematically smaller by a factor of two or more compared to that of C-GRBs. These distinct differences between the X-ray afterglows of XRFs and C-GRBs may be the key to understanding not only the mysterious shallow-to-steep break in X-ray afterglow light curves, but also the unique nature of XRFs.
  • GRB 070610 is a typical high-energy event with a duration of 5s.Yet within the burst localization we detect a highly unusual X-ray and optical transient, SwiftJ195509.6+261406. We see high amplitude X-ray and optical variability on very short time scales even at late times. Using near-infrared imaging assisted by a laser guide star and adaptive optics, we identified the counterpart of SwiftJ195509.6+261406. Late-time optical and near-infrared imaging constrain the spectral type of the counterpart to be fainter than a K-dwarf assuming it is of Galactic origin. It is possible that GRB 070610 and Swift J195509.6+261406 are unrelated sources. However, the absence of a typical X-ray afterglow from GRB 070610 in conjunction with the spatial and temporal coincidence of the two motivate us to suggest that the sources are related. The closest (imperfect) analog to Swift J195509.6+261406 is V4641 Sgr, an unusual black hole binary. We suggest that Swift J195509.6+261406 along with V4641 Sgr define a sub-class of stellar black hole binaries -- the fast X-ray novae. We further suggest that fast X-ray novae are associated with bursts of gamma-rays. If so, GRB 070610 defines a new class of celestial gamma-ray bursts and these bursts dominate the long-duration GRB demographics
  • In this concluding part of the series of three papers dedicated to the Swift/BAT hard X-ray survey (BXS), we focus on the X-ray spectral analysis and statistical properties of the source sample. Using a dedicated method to extract time-averaged spectra of BAT sources we show that Galactic sources have, generally, softer spectra than extragalactic objects and that Seyfert 2 galaxies are harder than Seyfert 1s. The averaged spectrum of all Seyfert galaxies is consistent with a power-law with photon index of 2.00 (+/-0.07). The cumulative flux-number relation for the extragalactic sources in the 14-170 keV band is best described by a power-law with a slope alpha=1.55 (+/-0.20) and a normalization of 9.6$\pm1.9 \times 10^{-3}$ AGN deg$^{-2}$ (or 396(+/-80) AGN all-sky) above a flux level of 2$\times 10^{-11}$erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ (~0.85 mCrab). The integration of the cumulative flux per unit area indicates that BAT resolves 1-2% of the X-ray background emission in the 14-170 keV band. A sub-sample of 24 extragalactic sources above the 4.5 sigma detection limit is used to study the statistical properties of AGN. This sample comprises local Seyfert galaxies (z=0.026, median value) and ~10% blazars. We find that 55% of the Seyfert galaxies are absorbed by column densities of Log(N_H)>22, but that none is a bona fide Compton-thick. This study shows the capabilities of BAT to probe the hard X-ray sky to the mCrab level.
  • We report on the discovery by the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer of the eighth known transient accretion-powered millisecond pulsar, SWIFT J1756.9-2508, as part of routine observations with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope hard X-ray transient monitor. The pulsar was subsequently observed by both the X-Ray Telescope on Swift and the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array. It has a spin frequency of 182 Hz (5.5 ms) and an orbital period of 54.7 minutes. The minimum companion mass is between 0.0067 and 0.0086 solar masses, depending on the mass of the neutron star, and the upper limit on the mass is 0.030 solar masses (95% confidence level). Such a low mass is inconsistent with brown dwarf models, and comparison with white dwarf models suggests that the companion is a He-dominated donor whose thermal cooling has been at least modestly slowed by irradiation from the accretion flux. No X-ray bursts, dips, eclipses or quasi-periodic oscillations were detected. The current outburst lasted approximately 13 days and no earlier outbursts were found in archival data.
  • We present the first Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalog of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which contains bursts detected by the BAT between 2004 December 19 and 2007 June 16. This catalog (hereafter BAT1 catalog) contains burst trigger time, location, 90% error radius, duration, fluence, peak flux, and time averaged spectral parameters for each of 237 GRBs, as measured by the BAT. The BAT-determined position reported here is within 1.75' of the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT)-determined position for 90% of these GRBs. The BAT T_90 and T_50 durations peak at 80 and 20 seconds, respectively. From the fluence-fluence correlation, we conclude that about 60% of the observed peak energies, Epeak, of BAT GRBs could be less than 100 keV. We confirm that GRB fluence to hardness and GRB peak flux to hardness are correlated for BAT bursts in analogous ways to previous missions' results. The correlation between the photon index in a simple power-law model and Epeak is also confirmed. We also report the current status for the on-orbit BAT calibrations based on observations of the Crab Nebula.
  • The MOJAVE sample is the first large radio-selected, VLBI-monitored AGN sample for which complete X-ray spectral information is being gathered. We report on the status of Swift survey observations which complement the available archival X-ray data at 0.3-10 keV and in the UV with its XRT and UVOT instruments. Many of these 133 radio-brightest AGN in the northern sky are now being observed for the first time at these energies. These and complementary other multi-wavelength observations provide a large statistical sample of radio-selected AGN whose spectral energy distributions are measured from radio to gamma-ray wavelengths, available at the beginning of GLAST operations in 2008. Here, we report the X-ray spectral characteristics of 36 of these previously unobserved MOJAVE sources. In addition, the number of MOJAVE sources detected by the BAT instrument in the hard X-ray band is growing: we report the detection of five new blazars with BAT.