• This note presents a method to tune the resonant frequency $f_{0}$ of a rectangular microwave cavity. This is achieved using a liquid metal, GaInSn, to decrease the volume of the cavity. It is possible to shift $f_{0}$ by filling the cavity with this alloy, in order to reduce the relative distance between the internal walls. The resulting modes have resonant frequencies in the range $7\div8\,$GHz. The capability of the system of producing an Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) measurement has been tested by placing a 1 mm diameter Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) sphere inside the cavity, and producing a strong coupling between the cavity resonance and Kittel mode. This work shows the possibility to tune a resonant system in the GHz range, which can be useful for several applications.
  • The current status of the QUAX R\&D program is presented. QUAX is a feasibility study for a detection of axion as dark matter based on the coupling to the electrons. The relevant signal is a magnetization change of a magnetic material placed inside a resonant microwave cavity and polarized with a static magnetic field.
  • We present a more stringent upper limit on long-range axion-mediated forces obtained by the QUAX-g$_p$g$_s$ experiment, located at the INFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro. We investigate the possible coupling between the electron spins of a paramagnetic GSO crystal and unpolarized nucleons of lead disks by measuring variations of GSO magnetization with a dc-SQUID magnetometer. Such an induced magnetization can be interpreted as the effect of a long-range spin dependent interaction mediated by axions or Axion Like Particles (ALPs). The corresponding coupling strength is proportional to the CP violating term $g_p^eg_s^N$, i.e. the product of the pseudoscalar and scalar coupling constants of electron and nucleon, respectively. Previous upper limits are improved by one order of magnitude, namely $g_p^eg_s^N/(\hbar c) \le 4.3\times10^{-30}$ at 95% confidence level, in the interaction range $10^{-3}$ m $<\lambda_a<0.2$ m. We eventually discuss our plans to improve the QUAX-g$_p$g$_s$ sensitivity by a few orders of magnitude, which will allow us to investigate the $\vartheta\simeq 10^{-10}$ range of CP-violating parameter and test some QCD axion models.
  • We present a detection scheme to search for QCD axion dark matter, that is based on a direct interaction between axions and electrons explicitly predicted by DFSZ axion models. The local axion dark matter field shall drive transitions between Zeeman-split atomic levels separated by the axion rest mass energy $m_a c^2$. Axion-related excitations are then detected with an upconversion scheme involving a pump laser that converts the absorbed axion energy ($\sim $ hundreds of $\mu$eV) to visible or infrared photons, where single photon detection is an established technique. The proposed scheme involves rare-earth ions doped into solid-state crystalline materials, and the optical transitions take place between energy levels of $4f^N$ electron configuration. Beyond discussing theoretical aspects and requirements to achieve a cosmologically relevant sensitivity, especially in terms of spectroscopic material properties, we experimentally investigate backgrounds due to the pump laser at temperatures in the range $1.9-4.2$ K. Our results rule out excitation of the upper Zeeman component of the ground state by laser-related heating effects, and are of some help in optimizing activated material parameters to suppress the multiphonon-assisted Stokes fluorescence.
  • We have studied the cathodo- and radioluminescence of Nd:YAG and of Tm:YAG single crystals in an extended wavelength range up to $\approx 5\,\mu$m in view of developing a new kind of detector for low-energy, low-rate energy deposition events. Whereas the light yield in the visible range is as large as $\approx 10^{4}\,$photons/MeV, in good agreement with literature results, in the infrared range we have found a light yield $\approx 5\times 10^{4}\,$photons/MeV, thereby proving that ionizing radiation is particularly efficient in populating the low lying levels of rare earth doped crystals.
  • We present a proposal to search for QCD axions with mass in the 200 $\mu$eV range, assuming that they make a dominant component of dark matter. Due to the axion-electron spin coupling, their effect is equivalent to the application of an oscillating rf field with frequency and amplitude fixed by the axion mass and coupling respectively. This equivalent magnetic field would produce spin flips in a magnetic sample placed inside a static magnetic field, which determines the resonant interaction at the Larmor frequency. Spin flips would subsequently emit radio frequency photons that can be detected by a suitable quantum counter in an ultra-cryogenic environment. This new detection technique is crucial to keep under control the thermal photon background which would otherwise produce a too large noise.
  • We propose a new technique to measure the infrared scintillation light yield of rare earth (RE) doped crystals by comparing it to near UV-visible scintillation of a calibrated Pr:(Lu$_{0.75}$Y$_{0.25}$)$_{3}$Al$_5$O$_{12}$ sample. As an example, we apply this technique to provide the light yield in visible and infrared range up to \SI{1700}{nm} of this crystal.
  • We demonstrate an all-optical method for manipulating the magnetization in a 1-mm YIG (yttrium-iron-garnet) sphere placed in a $\sim0.17\,$T uniform magnetic field. An harmonic of the frequency comb delivered by a multi-GHz infrared laser source is tuned to the Larmor frequency of the YIG sphere to drive magnetization oscillations, which in turn give rise to a radiation field used to thoroughly investigate the phenomenon. The radiation damping issue that occurs at high frequency and in the presence of highly magnetizated materials, has been overcome by exploiting magnon-photon strong coupling regime in microwave cavities. Our findings demonstrate an effective technique for ultrafast control of the magnetization vector in optomagnetic materials via polarization rotation and intensity modulation of an incident laser beam. We eventually get a second-order susceptibility value of $\sim10^{-7}$ cm$^2$/MW for single crystal YIG.
  • We report on the experimental investigation of the efficiency of some nonlinear crystals to generate microwave (RF) radiation as a result of optical rectification (OR) when irradiated with intense pulse trains delivered by a mode-locked laser at $1064\,$nm. We have investigated lithium triborate (LBO), lithium niobate (LiNbO$_3$), zinc selenide (ZnSe), and also potassium titanyl orthophosphate (KTP) for comparison with previous measurements. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions based on the form of the second-order nonlinear susceptibility tensor. For some crystals we investigated also the second harmonic generation (SHG) to cross check the theoretical model. We confirm the theoretical prediction that OR leads to the production of higher order RF harmonics that are overtones of the laser repetition rate.
  • We report about a novel scheme for particle detection based on the infrared quantum counter concept. Its operation consists of a two-step excitation process of a four level system, that can be realized in rare earth-doped crystals when a cw pump laser is tuned to the transition from the second to the fourth level. The incident particle raises the atoms of the active material into a low lying, metastable energy state, triggering the absorption of the pump laser to a higher level. Following a rapid non-radiative decay to a fluorescent level, an optical signal is observed with a conventional detectors. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of such a scheme, we have investigated the emission from the fluorescent level $^4$S$_{3/2}$ (540 nm band) in an Er$^{3+}$-doped YAG crystal pumped by a tunable titanium sapphire laser when it is irradiated with 60 keV electrons delivered by an electron gun. We have obtained a clear signature this excitation increases the $^{4}I_{13/2}$ metastable level population that can efficiently be exploited to generate a detectable optical signal.
  • We report on a novel electro-optic device for the diagnostics of high repetition rate laser systems. It is composed of a microwave receiver and of a second order nonlinear crystal, whose irradiation with a train of short laser pulses produces a time-dependent polarization in the crystal itself as a consequence of optical rectification. This process gives rise to the emission of microwave radiation that is detected by a receiver and is analyzed to infer the repetition rate and intensity of the pulses. We believe that this new method may overcome some of the limitations of photodetection techniques.
  • We report measurements of microwave (RF) generation in the centimeter band accomplished by irradiating a nonlinear KTiOPO$_4$ (KTP) crystal with a home-made, infrared laser at $1064\,$nm as a result of optical rectification (OR). The laser delivers pulse trains of duration up to $1\,\mu$s. Each train consists of several high-intensity pulses at an adjustable repetition rate of approximately $ 4.6\,$GHz. The duration of the generated RF pulses is determined by that of the pulse trains. We have investigated both microwave- and second harmonic (SHG) generation as a function of the laser intensity and of the orientation of the laser polarization with respect to the crystallographic axes of KTP.
  • The Casimir effect is a well-known macroscopic consequence of quantum vacuum fluctuations, but whereas the static effect (Casimir force) has long been observed experimentally, the dynamic Casimir effect is up to now undetected. From an experimental viewpoint a possible detection would imply the vibration of a mirror at gigahertz frequencies. Mechanical motions at such frequencies turn out to be technically unfeasible. Here we present a different experimental scheme where mechanical motions are avoided, and the results of laboratory tests showing that the scheme is practically feasible. We think that at present this approach gives the only possibility of detecting this phenomenon.