• We report on the discovery of a z=1.58 mature cluster around the high-redshift radio galaxy 7C1753+6311, first identified in the Clusters Around Radio-Loud AGN survey. Two-thirds of the excess galaxies within the central 1Mpc lie on a red sequence with a colour that is consistent with an average formation redshift of zf~3. We show that 80+/-6% of the red sequence galaxies in the cluster core are quiescent, while the remaining 20% are red due to dusty star formation. We demonstrate that the cluster has an enhanced quiescent galaxy fraction that is three times that of the control field. We also show that this enhancement is mass dependent: 91+/-9% of the M* >10^{10.5}Msun cluster galaxies are quiescent, compared to only 36+/-2% of field galaxies, whereas the fraction of quiescent galaxies with lower masses is the same in the cluster and field environments. The presence of a dense core and a well-formed, quiescent red sequence suggest that this is a mature cluster. This means that distant radio galaxies do not solely reside in young, uncollapsed protoclusters, rather they can be found in clusters in a wide range of evolutionary states.
  • Observed at z = 4.601 and with L_bol = 3.5 x 10^14 Lsun, W2246-0526 is the most luminous galaxy known in the Universe, and hosts a deeply-buried active galactic nucleus (AGN)/super-massive black hole (SMBH). Discovered using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), W2246-0526 is classified as a Hot Dust Obscured Galaxy (Hot DOG), based on its luminosity and dust temperature. Here we present spatially resolved ALMA [CII]157.7um observations of W2246-0526, providing unique insight into the kinematics of its interstellar medium (ISM). The measured [CII]-to-far-infrared ratio is ~2 x 10^-4, implying ISM conditions that compare only with the most obscured, compact starbursts and AGN in the local Universe today. The spatially resolved [CII] line is strikingly uniform and very broad, 500-600 km/s wide, extending throughout the entire galaxy over about 2.5 kpc, with modest shear. Such a large, homogeneous velocity dispersion indicates a highly turbulent medium. W2246-0526 is unstable in terms of the energy and momentum that are being injected into the ISM, strongly suggesting that the gas is being blown away from the system isotropically, likely reflecting a cathartic state on its road to becoming an un-obscured quasar. W2246-0526 provides an extraordinary laboratory to study and model the properties and kinematics of gas in an extreme environment under strong feedback, at a time when the Universe was 1/10 of its current age: a system pushing the limits that can be reached during galaxy formation.
  • We describe the search for Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) near the sub-millimeter bright starburst galaxy HFLS3 at $z$$=$6.34 and a study on the environment of this massive galaxy during the end of reionization.We performed two independent selections of LBGs on images obtained with the \textit{Gran Telescopio Canarias} (GTC) and the \textit{Hubble Space Telescope} (HST) by combining non-detections in bands blueward of the Lyman-break and color selection. A total of 10 objects fulfilling the LBG selection criteria at $z$$>$5.5 were selected over the 4.54 and 55.5 arcmin$^2$ covered by our HST and GTC images, respectively. The photometric redshift, UV luminosity, and the star-formation rate of these sources were estimated with models of their spectral energy distribution. These $z$$\sim$6 candidates have physical properties and number densities in agreement with previous results. The UV luminosity function at $z$$\sim$6 and a Voronoi tessellation analysis of this field shows no strong evidence for an overdensity of relatively bright objects (m$_{F105W}$$<$25.9) associated with \textit{HFLS3}. However, the over-density parameter deduced from this field and the surface density of objects can not excluded definitively the LBG over-density hypothesis. Moreover we identified three faint objects at less than three arcseconds from \textit{HFLS3} with color consistent with those expected for $z$$\sim$6 galaxies. Deeper data are needed to confirm their redshifts and to study their association with \textit{HFLS3} and the galaxy merger that may be responsible for the massive starburst.
  • We discuss the restframe UV emission from the starbursting galaxy HFLS3 at z=6.34, discovered in Herschel/SPIRE data due to its red color in the submm wavelengths from 250-500 um. The apparent inst. SFR of HFLS3 inferred from the total FIR luminosity measured with over 15 photometric data points between 100 to 1000 um is 2900 Msun/yr. Keck/NIRC2 Ks band adaptive optics imaging data showed two potential NIR counterparts near HFLS3. Previously, the northern galaxy was taken to be in the foreground at z=2.1 while the southern galaxy was assumed to HFLS3's NIR counterpart. New HST/WFC3 and ACS imaging data show both optically bright galaxies are in the foreground at z<6. A new lensing model based on HST data and mm-wave continuum emission yields a magnification of 2.2+/-0.3. The lack of multiple imaging constrains the lensing magnification to be lower than either 2.7 or 3.5 at the 95% confidence level for the two scenarios, which attribute one or two components to HFLS3 in the source plane. Correcting for gravitational lensing, the inst. SFR is 1320 Msun/yr with the 95% confidence lower limit around 830 Msun/yr. Using models for the restframe UV to FIR SED, the ave. SFR over the last 100 Myr is around 660 Msun/yr. The dust and stellar masses of HFLS3 from the same SED models are 3x10^8 Msun and ~5x10^10 Msun, respectively, with large systematic uncertainties on assumptions related to the SED model. With HST/WFC3 images we also find diffuse NIR emission about 0.5" (~3 kpc) SW of HFLS3 that remains undetected in the ACS data. The emission has a photometric redshift consistent with either z~6 or a dusty galaxy template at z~2. If at the same redshift as HFLS3 the detected diffuse emission could be part of the complex merger system that could be triggering the starburst. Alternatively, it could be part of the foreground structure at z~2.1 that is responsible for lensing of HFLS3.
  • We study the far-infrared properties of 498 Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs) at z=2.8, 3.1 and 4.5 in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South, using 250, 350 and 500 micron data from the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) and 870 micron data from the LABOCA ECDFS Submillimeter Survey (LESS). None of the 126, 280 or 92 LAEs at z=2.8, 3.1 and 4.5, respectively, are individually detected in the far-infrared data. We use stacking to probe the average emission to deeper flux limits, reaching $1\sigma$ depths of ~0.1 to 0.4 mJy. The LAEs are also undetected at $\ge3\sigma$ in the stacks, although a $2.5\sigma$ signal is observed at 870 micron for the z=2.8 sources. We consider a wide range of far-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs), including a M82 and an Sd galaxy template, to determine upper limits on the far-infrared luminosities and far-infrared-derived star-formation rates of the LAEs. These star-formation rates are then combined with those inferred from the Ly$\alpha$ and UV emission to determine lower limits on the LAEs Ly$\alpha$ escape fraction ($f_{\rm esc}($Ly$\alpha$)). For the Sd SED template, the inferred LAEs $f_{\rm esc}($Ly$\alpha$) are $\gtrsim30%$ ($1\sigma$) at z=2.8, 3.1 and 4.5, which are all significantly higher than the global $f_{\rm esc}($Ly$\alpha$) at these redshifts. Thus, if the LAEs $f_{\rm esc}($Ly$\alpha$) follows the global evolution then they have warmer far-infrared SEDs than the Sd galaxy template. The average and M82 SEDs produce lower limits on the LAE $f_{\rm esc}($Ly$\alpha$) of ~10 to 20% ($1\sigma$), all of which are slightly higher than the global evolution of $f_{\rm esc}($Ly$\alpha$) but consistent with it at the 2 to 3$\sigma$ level.
  • We present the first set of maps and band-merged catalog from the Herschel Stripe 82 Survey (HerS). Observations at 250, 350, and 500 micron were taken with the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) instrument aboard the Herschel Space Observatory. HerS covers 79 deg$^2$ along the SDSS Stripe 82 to a depth of 13.0, 12.9, and 14.8 mJy beam$^{-1}$ (including confusion) at 250, 350, and 500 micron, respectively. HerS was designed to measure correlations with external tracers of the dark matter density field --- either point-like (i.e., galaxies selected from radio to X-ray) or extended (i.e., clusters and gravitational lensing) --- in order to measure the bias and redshift distribution of intensities of infrared-emitting dusty star-forming galaxies and AGN. By locating HeRS in Stripe 82, we maximize the overlap with available and upcoming cosmological surveys. The band-merged catalog contains 3.3x10$^4$ sources detected at a significance of >3 $\sigma$ (including confusion noise). The maps and catalog are available at http://www.astro.caltech.edu/hers/
  • We present a method for selecting $z>4$ dusty, star forming galaxies (DSFGs) using Herschel/SPIRE 250/350/500 $\mu m$ flux densities to search for red sources. We apply this method to 21 deg$^2$ of data from the HerMES survey to produce a catalog of 38 high-$z$ candidates. Follow-up of the first 5 of these sources confirms that this method is efficient at selecting high-$z$ DSFGs, with 4/5 at $z=4.3$ to $6.3$ (and the remaining source at $z=3.4$), and that they are some of the most luminous dusty sources known. Comparison with previous DSFG samples, mostly selected at longer wavelengths (e.g., 850 $\mu m$) and in single-band surveys, shows that our method is much more efficient at selecting high-$z$ DSFGs, in the sense that a much larger fraction are at $z>3$. Correcting for the selection completeness and purity, we find that the number of bright ($S_{500\,\mu m} \ge 30$ mJy), red Herschel sources is $3.3 \pm 0.8$ deg$^{-2}$. This is much higher than the number predicted by current models, suggesting that the DSFG population extends to higher redshifts than previously believed. If the shape of the luminosity function for high-$z$ DSFGs is similar to that at $z\sim2$, rest-frame UV based studies may be missing a significant component of the star formation density at $z=4$ to $6$, even after correction for extinction.
  • We quantify the fraction of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) that originates from galaxies identified in the UV/optical/near-infrared by stacking 81,250 (~35.7 arcmin^2) K-selected sources (K_AB < 24.0), split according to their rest-frame U - V vs. V - J colors into 72,216 star-forming and 9,034 quiescent galaxies, on maps from Spitzer/MIPS (24um), Herschel/SPIRE (250, 350, 500um), Herschel/PACS (100, 160um), and AzTEC (1100um). The fraction of the CIB resolved by our catalog is (69 $\pm$ 15)% at 24um, (78 $\pm$ 17)% at 70um, (58 $\pm$ 13)% at 100um, (78 $\pm$ 18)% at 160um, (80 $\pm$ 17)% at 250um, (69 $\pm$ 14)% at 350um, (65 $\pm$ 12)% at 500um, and (45 $\pm$ 8)% at 1100um. Of that total, about 95% originates from star-forming galaxies, while the remaining 5% is from apparently quiescent galaxies. The CIB at $\lambda$ < 200um is sourced predominantly from galaxies at z < 1, while at $\lambda$ > 200um the bulk originates from 1 < z < 2. Galaxies with stellar masses log(M/ M_sun)=9.5-11 are responsible for the majority of the CIB, with those in the log(M/ M_sun)=9.5-10 contributing mostly at $\lambda$ < 250um, and those in the log(M/ M_sun)=10.5-11 bin dominating at $\lambda$ > 350um. The contribution from galaxies in the log(M/ M_sun)=9.0-9.5 and log(M/ M_sun)=11.0-12.0 stellar mass bins contribute the least, both of order 5%, although the highest stellar-mass bin is a significant contributor to the luminosity density at z > 2. The luminosities of the galaxies responsible for the CIB shifts from a combination of "normal" and luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) at $\lambda$ < 160um, to LIRGs at 160um < $\lambda$ < 500um, to finally LIRGs and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at $\lambda$ > 500um. Stacking analyses were performed with SIMSTACK (available at http://www.astro.caltech.edu/~viero/viero_homepage/toolbox.html) which accounts for possible biases due to clustering.
  • We combine Hubble Space Telescope (HST) G102 & G141 NIR grism spectroscopy with HST/WFC3-UVIS, HST/WFC3-IR and Spitzer/IRAC[3.6\mu m] photometry to assemble a sample of massive (log(M_star/M_sun) ~ 11) and quenched galaxies at z~1.5. Our sample of 41 galaxies is the largest with G102+G141 NIR spectroscopy for quenched sources at these redshifts. In contrast to the local Universe, z~1.5 quenched galaxies in the high-mass range have a wide range of stellar population properties. We find their SEDs are well fitted with exponentially decreasing SFHs, and short star-formation time-scales (\tau<100Myr). Quenched galaxies also show a wide distribution in ages, between 1-4Gyr. In the (u-r)_0-versus-mass space quenched galaxies have a large spread in rest-frame color at a given mass. Most quenched galaxies populate the z~1.5 red-sequence (RS), but an important fraction of them (32%) have substantially bluer colors. Although with a large spread, we find that the quenched galaxies ON the RS have older median ages (3.1Gyr) than the quenched galaxies OFF the RS (1.5Gyr). We also show that a rejuvenated SED cannot reproduce the observed stacked spectra of (the bluer) quenched galaxies OFF the RS. We derive the upper limit on the fraction of massive galaxies ON the RS at z~1.5 to be <43%. We speculate that the young quenched galaxies OFF the RS are in a transition phase between vigorous star formation at z>2 and the z~1.5 RS. According to their estimated ages, the time required for quenched galaxies OFF the RS to join their counterparts ON the z~1.5 RS is of the order of ~1Gyr.
  • Stellar archeology shows that massive elliptical galaxies today formed rapidly about ten billion years ago with star formation rates above several hundreds solar masses per year (M_sun/yr). Their progenitors are likely the sub-millimeter-bright galaxies (SMGs) at redshifts (z) greater than 2. While SMGs' mean molecular gas mass of 5x10^10 M_sun can explain the formation of typical elliptical galaxies, it is inadequate to form ellipticals that already have stellar masses above 2x10^11 M_sun at z ~ 2. Here we report multi-wavelength high-resolution observations of a rare merger of two massive SMGs at z = 2.3. The system is currently forming stars at a tremendous rate of 2,000 M_sun/yr. With a star formation efficiency an order-of-magnitude greater than that of normal galaxies, it will quench the star formation by exhausting the gas reservoir in only ~200 million years. At a projected separation of 19 kiloparsecs, the two massive starbursts are about to merge and form a passive elliptical galaxy with a stellar mass of ~4x10^11 M_sun. Our observations show that gas-rich major galaxy mergers, concurrent with intense star formation, can form the most massive elliptical galaxies by z ~ 1.5.
  • Massive present-day early-type (elliptical and lenticular) galaxies probably gained the bulk of their stellar mass and heavy elements through intense, dust-enshrouded starbursts - that is, increased rates of star formation - in the most massive dark matter halos at early epochs. However, it remains unknown how soon after the Big Bang such massive starburst progenitors exist. The measured redshift distribution of dusty, massive starbursts has long been suspected to be biased low in redshift owing to selection effects, as confirmed by recent findings of systems out to redshift z~5. Here we report the identification of a massive starburst galaxy at redshift 6.34 through a submillimeter color-selection technique. We unambiguously determined the redshift from a suite of molecular and atomic fine structure cooling lines. These measurements reveal a hundred billion solar masses of highly excited, chemically evolved interstellar medium in this galaxy, which constitutes at least 40% of the baryonic mass. A "maximum starburst" converts the gas into stars at a rate more than 2,000 times that of the Milky Way, a rate among the highest observed at any epoch. Despite the overall downturn of cosmic star formation towards the highest redshifts, it seems that environments mature enough to form the most massive, intense starbursts existed at least as early as 880 million years after the Big Bang.
  • We present a list of 13 candidate gravitationally lensed submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) from 95 square degrees of the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey, a surface density of 0.14\pm0.04deg^{-2}. The selected sources have 500um flux densities (S_500) greater than 100mJy. Gravitational lensing is confirmed by follow-up observations in 9 of the 13 systems (70%), and the lensing status of the four remaining sources is undetermined. We also present a supplementary sample of 29 (0.31\pm0.06deg^{-2}) gravitationally lensed SMG candidates with S_500=80--100mJy, which are expected to contain a higher fraction of interlopers than the primary candidates. The number counts of the candidate lensed galaxies are consistent with a simple statistical model of the lensing rate, which uses a foreground matter distribution, the intrinsic SMG number counts, and an assumed SMG redshift distribution. The model predicts that 32--74% of our S_500>100mJy candidates are strongly gravitationally lensed (mu>2), with the brightest sources being the most robust; this is consistent with the observational data. Our statistical model also predicts that, on average, lensed galaxies with S_500=100mJy are magnified by factors of ~9, with apparently brighter galaxies having progressively higher average magnification, due to the shape of the intrinsic number counts. 65% of the sources are expected to have intrinsic 500micron flux densities less than 30mJy. Thus, samples of strongly gravitationally lensed SMGs, such as those presented here, probe below the nominal Herschel detection limit at 500 micron. They are good targets for the detailed study of the physical conditions in distant dusty, star-forming galaxies, due to the lensing magnification, which can lead to spatial resolutions of ~0.01" in the source plane.
  • In this paper we measure the merger fraction and rate, both minor and major, of massive early-type galaxies (M_star >= 10^11 M_Sun) in the COSMOS field, and study their role in mass and size evolution. We use the 30-band photometric catalogue in COSMOS, complemented with the spectroscopy of the zCOSMOS survey, to define close pairs with a separation 10h^-1 kpc <= r_p <= 30h-1 kpc and a relative velocity Delta v <= 500 km s^-1. We measure both major (stellar mass ratio mu = M_star,2/M_star,1 >= 1/4) and minor (1/10 <= mu < 1/4) merger fractions of massive galaxies, and study their dependence on redshift and on morphology. The merger fraction and rate of massive galaxies evolves as a power-law (1+z)^n, with major mergers increasing with redshift, n_MM = 1.4, and minor mergers showing little evolution, n_mm ~ 0. When split by their morphology, the minor merger fraction for early types is higher by a factor of three than that for spirals, and both are nearly constant with redshift. Our results show that massive early-type galaxies have undergone 0.89 mergers (0.43 major and 0.46 minor) since z ~ 1, leading to a mass growth of ~30%. We find that mu >= 1/10 mergers can explain ~55% of the observed size evolution of these galaxies since z ~ 1. Another ~20% is due to the progenitor bias (younger galaxies are more extended) and we estimate that very minor mergers (mu < 1/10) could contribute with an extra ~20%. The remaining ~5% should come from other processes (e.g., adiabatic expansion or observational effects). This picture also reproduces the mass growth and velocity dispersion evolution of these galaxies. We conclude from these results that merging is the main contributor to the size evolution of massive ETGs at z <= 1, accounting for ~50-75% of that evolution in the last 8 Gyr. Nearly half of the evolution due to mergers is related to minor (mu < 1/4) events.
  • The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the entire sky at mid-infrared wavelengths 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 microns. The mission was primarily designed to extract point sources, leaving resolved and extended sources unexplored. We have begun a dedicated WISE Enhanced Resolution Galaxy Atlas (WERGA) project to fully characterize large, nearby galaxies and produce a legacy image atlas and source catalogue. Here we demonstrate the first results of the project for a sample of 17 galaxies, chosen to be of large angular size, diverse morphology, color, stellar mass and star formation. It includes many well-studied galaxies, such as M51, M81, M83, M87, M101, IC342. Photometry and surface brightness decomposition is carried out after special super-resolution processing, achieving spatial fidelity similar to that of Spitzer-IRAC. We present WISE, Spitzer and GALEX photometric and characterization measurements, combining the measurements to study the global properties. We derive star formation rates using the PAH-sensitive 12 micron (W3) fluxes, warm-dust sensitive 22 micron (W4) fluxes, and young massive-star sensitive UV fluxes. Stellar masses are estimated using the 3.4 micron (W1) and 4.6 micron (W2) measurements that trace the dominant stellar mass content. We highlight and showcase the detailed results of M83, comparing the infrared results with the ATCA HI gas distribution and GALEX UV emission, tracing the evolution from gas to stars. In addition to the enhanced images, WISE all-sky coverage provides a tremendous advantage over Spitzer for building a complete nearby galaxy catalog, tracing both stellar mass and star formation histories. We discuss the construction of a complete mid-infrared catalog of galaxies and its complementary role to study the assembly and evolution of galaxies in the local universe.
  • We present Keck spectroscopic observations and redshifts for a sample of 767 Herschel-SPIRE selected galaxies (HSGs) at 250, 350, and 500um, taken with the Keck I Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS) and the Keck II DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph (DEIMOS). The redshift distribution of these SPIRE sources from the Herschel Multitiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) peaks at z=0.85, with 731 sources at z<2 and a tail of sources out to z~5. We measure more significant disagreement between photometric and spectroscopic redshifts (<delta_z>/(1+z)>=0.29) than is seen in non-infrared selected samples, likely due to enhanced star formation rates and dust obscuration in infrared-selected galaxies. We estimate that the vast majority (72-83%) of z<2 Herschel-selected galaxies would drop out of traditional submillimeter surveys at 0.85-1mm. We estimate the luminosity function and implied star-formation rate density contribution of HSGs at z<1.6 and find overall agreement with work based on 24um extrapolations of the LIRG, ULIRG and total infrared contributions. This work significantly increased the number of spectroscopically confirmed infrared-luminous galaxies at z>>0 and demonstrates the growing importance of dusty starbursts for galaxy evolution studies and the build-up of stellar mass throughout cosmic time. [abridged]
  • We present spectroscopic observations for a sample of 36 Herschel-SPIRE 250-500um selected galaxies (HSGs) at 2<z<5 from the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES). Redshifts are confirmed as part of a large redshift survey of Herschel-SPIRE-selected sources covering ~0.93deg^2 in six extragalactic legacy fields. Observations were taken with the Keck I Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS) and the Keck II DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph (DEIMOS). Precise astrometry, needed for spectroscopic follow-up, is determined by identification of counterparts at 24um or 1.4GHz using a cross-identification likelihood matching method. Individual source luminosities range from log(L_IR/Lsun)=12.5-13.6 (corresponding to star formation rates 500-9000Msun/yr, assuming a Salpeter IMF), constituting some of the most intrinsically luminous, distant infrared galaxies yet discovered. We present both individual and composite rest-frame ultraviolet spectra and infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The selection of these HSGs is reproducible and well characterized across large areas of sky in contrast to most z>2 HyLIRGs in the literature which are detected serendipitously or via tailored surveys searching only for high-z HyLIRGs; therefore, we can place lower limits on the contribution of HSGs to the cosmic star formation rate density at (7+-2)x10^(-3)Msun/yr h^3Mpc^(-3) at z~2.5, which is >10% of the estimated total star formation rate density (SFRD) of the Universe from optical surveys. The contribution at z~4 has a lower limit of 3x10^(-3)Msun/yr h^3 Mpc^(-3), ~>20% of the estimated total SFRD. This highlights the importance of extremely infrared-luminous galaxies with high star formation rates to the build-up of stellar mass, even at the earliest epochs.
  • The infrared (IR) emission of M_* galaxies (10^{10.4} < M_{star} < 10^{11.0} M_\sun) in galaxy pairs, derived using data obtained in Herschel (PEP/HerMES) and Spitzer (S-COSMOS) surveys, is compared to that of single disk galaxies in well matched control samples to study the cosmic evolution of the star-formation enhancement induced by galaxy-galaxy interaction. Both the mean IR SED and mean IR luminosity of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) in SFG+SFG (S+S) pairs in the redshift bin of 0.6 < z < 1 are consistent with no star-formation enhancement. SFGs in S+S pairs in a lower redshift bin of 0.2 < z < 0.6 show marginal evidence for a weak star-formation enhancement. Together with the significant and strong sSFR enhancement shown by SFGs in a local sample of S+S pairs (obtained using previously published Spitzer observations), our results reveal a trend for the star-formation enhancement in S+S pairs to decrease with increasing redshift. Between z=0 and z=1, this decline of interaction-induced star-formation enhancement occurs in parallel with the dramatic increase (by a factor of ~10) of the sSFR of single SFGs, both can be explained by the higher gas fraction in higher z disks. SFGs in mixed pairs (S+E pairs) do not show any significant star-formation enhancement at any redshift. The difference between SFGs in S+S pairs and in S+E pairs suggests a modulation of the sSFR by the inter-galactic medium IGM in the dark matter halos (DMH) hosting these pairs.
  • After eight months of continuous observations, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the entire sky at 3.4 {\mu}m, 4.6 {\mu}m, 12 {\mu}m and 22 {\mu}m. We have begun a dedicated WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas (WHRGA) project to fully characterize large, nearby galaxies and produce a legacy image atlas and source catalogue. Here we summarize the deconvolution technique used to significantly improve the spatial resolution of WISE imaging, specifically designed to study the internal anatomy of nearby galaxies. As a case study, we present results for the galaxy NGC 1566, comparing the WISE super-resolution image processing to that of Spitzer, GALEX and ground-based imaging. The is the first paper in a two part series; results for a much larger sample of nearby galaxies is presented in the second paper.
  • The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Nearby Galaxies Legacy Survey (NGLS) comprises an HI-selected sample of 155 galaxies spanning all morphological types with distances less than 25 Mpc. We describe the scientific goals of the survey, the sample selection, and the observing strategy. We also present an atlas and analysis of the CO J=3-2 maps for the 47 galaxies in the NGLS which are also part of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey. We find a wide range of molecular gas mass fractions in the galaxies in this sample and explore the correlation of the far-infrared luminosity, which traces star formation, with the CO luminosity, which traces the molecular gas mass. By comparing the NGLS data with merging galaxies at low and high redshift which have also been observed in the CO J=3-2 line, we show that the correlation of far-infrared and CO luminosity shows a significant trend with luminosity. This trend is consistent with a molecular gas depletion time which is more than an order of magnitude faster in the merger galaxies than in nearby normal galaxies. We also find a strong correlation of the L(FIR)/L(CO3-2) ratio with the atomic to molecular gas mass ratio. This correlation suggests that some of the far-infrared emission originates from dust associated with atomic gas and that its contribution is particularly important in galaxies where most of the gas is in the atomic phase.
  • The WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallel Survey (WISP) uses the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) infrared grism capabilities to obtain slitless spectra of thousands of galaxies over a wide redshift range including the peak of star formation history of the Universe. We select a population of very strong emission-line galaxies with rest-frame equivalent widths higher than 200 A. A total of 176 objects are found over the redshift range 0.35 < z < 2.3 in the 180 arcmin^2 area we analyzed so far. After estimating the AGN fraction in the sample, we show that this population consists of young and low-mass starbursts with higher specific star formation rates than normal star-forming galaxies at any redshift. After spectroscopic follow-up of one of these galaxies with Keck/LRIS, we report the detection at z = 0.7 of an extremely metal-poor galaxy with 12+Log(O/H)= 7.47 +- 0.11. The nebular emission-lines can substantially affect the broadband flux density with a median brightening of 0.3 mag, with examples producing brightening of up to 1 mag. The presence of strong emission lines in low-z galaxies can mimic the color-selection criteria used in the z ~ 8 dropout surveys. In order to effectively remove low redshift interlopers, deep optical imaging is needed, at least 1 mag deeper than the bands in which the objects are detected. Finally, we empirically demonstrate that strong nebular lines can lead to an overestimation of the mass and the age of galaxies derived from fitting of their SED. Without removing emission lines, the age and the stellar mass estimates are overestimated by a factor of 2 on average and up to a factor of 10 for the high-EW galaxies. Therefore the contribution of emission lines should be systematically taken into account in SED fitting of star-forming galaxies at all redshifts.
  • We report the discovery of a bright ($f(250\mum) > 400$ mJy), multiply-lensed submillimeter galaxy \obj\ in {\it Herschel}/SPIRE Science Demonstration Phase data from the HerMES project. Interferometric 880\mum\ Submillimeter Array observations resolve at least four images with a large separation of $\sim 9\arcsec$. A high-resolution adaptive optics $K_p$ image with Keck/NIRC2 clearly shows strong lensing arcs. Follow-up spectroscopy gives a redshift of $z=2.9575$, and the lensing model gives a total magnification of $\mu \sim 11 \pm 1$. The large image separation allows us to study the multi-wavelength spectral energy distribution (SED) of the lensed source unobscured by the central lensing mass. The far-IR/millimeter-wave SED is well described by a modified blackbody fit with an unusually warm dust temperature, $88 \pm 3$ K. We derive a lensing-corrected total IR luminosity of $(1.43 \pm 0.09) \times 10^{13}\, \mathrm{L}_{\odot}$, implying a star formation rate of $\sim 2500\, \mathrm{M}_{\odot}\, \mathrm{yr}^{-1}$. However, models primarily developed from brighter galaxies selected at longer wavelengths are a poor fit to the full optical-to-millimeter SED. A number of other strongly lensed systems have already been discovered in early {\it Herschel} data, and many more are expected as additional data are collected.
  • We present the results of a gravitational lensing analysis of the bright $\zs=2.957$ sub-millimeter galaxy (SMG), HERMES J105751.1+573027 found in {\it Herschel}/SPIRE Science Demonstration Phase data from the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) project. The high resolution imaging available in optical and Near-IR channels, along with CO emission obtained with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer, allow us to precisely estimate the intrinsic source extension and hence estimate the total lensing magnification to be $\mu=10.9\pm 0.7$. We measure the half-light radius $R_{\rm eff}$ of the source in the rest-frame Near-UV and $V$ bands that characterize the unobscured light coming from stars and find $R_{\rm eff,*}= [2.0 \pm 0.1]$ kpc, in good agreement with recent studies on the Submillimeter Galaxy population. This lens model is also used to estimate the size of the gas distribution ($R_{\rm eff,gas}= [1.1\pm0.5]$) kpc by mapping back in the source plane the CO (J=5-4) transition line emission. The lens modeling yields a relatively large Einstein radius $R_{\rm Ein}= 4\farcs10 \pm 0\farcs02$, corresponding to a deflector velocity dispersion of [$483\pm 16] \,\kms$. This shows that HERMES J105751.1+573027 is lensed by a {\it galaxy group-size} dark matter halo at redshift $\zl\sim 0.6$. The projected dark matter contribution largely dominates the mass budget within the Einstein radius with $f_{\rm dm}(<R_{\rm Ein})\sim 80%$. This fraction reduces to $f_{\rm dm}(<R_{\rm eff,G1}\simeq 4.5\kpc)\sim 47%$ within the effective radius of the main deflecting galaxy of stellar mass $M_{\rm *,G1}=[8.5\pm 1.6] \times 10^{11}\msun$. At this smaller scale the dark matter fraction is consistent with results already found for massive lensing ellipticals at $z\sim0.2$ from the SLACS survey.
  • We present 3.6 and 4.5 micron Spitzer IRAC imaging over 0.77 square degrees at the Virgo cluster core for the purpose of understanding the formation mechanisms of the low surface brightness intracluster light features. Instrumental and astrophysical backgrounds that are hundreds of times higher than the signal were carefully characterized and removed. We examine both intracluster light plumes as well as the outer halo of the giant elliptical M87. For two intracluster light plumes, we use optical colors to constrain their ages to be greater than 3 & 5 Gyr, respectively. Upper limits on the IRAC fluxes constrain the upper limits to the masses, and optical detections constrain the lower limits to the masses. In this first measurement of mass of intracluster light plumes we find masses in the range of 5.5 x 10^8 - 4.5 x 10^9 and 2.1 x 10^8 - 1.5 x 10^9 solar masses for the two plumes for which we have coverage. Given their expected short lifetimes, and a constant production rate for these types of streams, integrated over Virgo's lifetime, they can account for the total ICL content of the cluster implying that we do not need to invoke ICL formation mechanisms other than gravitational mechanisms leading to bright plumes. We also examined the outer halo of the giant elliptical M87. The color profile from the inner to outer halo of M87 (160 Kpc) is consistent with either a flat or optically blue gradient, where a blue gradient could be due to younger or lower metallicity stars at larger radii. The similarity of the age predicted by both the infrared and optical colors (> few Gyr) indicates that the optical measurements are not strongly affected by dust extinction.
  • We present the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallel (WISP) Survey. WISP is obtaining slitless, near-infrared grism spectroscopy of ~ 90 independent, high-latitude fields by observing in the pure parallel mode with Wide Field Camera-3 on the Hubble Space Telescope for a total of ~ 250 orbits. Spectra are obtained with the G102 (lambda=0.8-1.17 microns, R ~ 210) and G141 grisms (lambda=1.11-1.67 microns, R ~ 130), together with direct imaging in the J- and H-bands (F110W and F140W, respectively). In the present paper, we present the first results from 19 WISP fields, covering approximately 63 square arc minutes. For typical exposure times (~ 6400 sec in G102 and ~ 2700 sec in G141), we reach 5-sigma detection limits for emission lines of 5 x 10^(-17) ergs s^(-1) cm^(-2) for compact objects. Typical direct imaging 5sigma-limits are 26.8 and 25.0 magnitudes (AB) in F110W and F140W, respectively. Restricting ourselves to the lines measured with highest confidence, we present a list of 328 emission lines, in 229 objects, in a redshift range 0.3 < z < 3. The single-line emitters are likely to be a mix of Halpha and [OIII]5007,4959 A, with Halpha predominating. The overall surface density of high-confidence emission-line objects in our sample is approximately 4 per arcmin^(2).These first fields show high equivalent width sources, AGN, and post starburst galaxies. The median observed star formation rate of our Halpha selected sample is 4 Msol/year. At intermediate redshifts, we detect emission lines in galaxies as faint as H_140 ~ 25, or M_R < -19, and are sensitive to star formation rates down to less than 1 Msol/year. The slitless grisms on WFC3 provide a unique opportunity to study the spectral properties of galaxies much fainter than L* at the peak of the galaxy assembly epoch.
  • We present a study of an extended Lyman-alpha (Lya) nebula located in a known overdensity at z~2.38. The data include multiwavelength photometry covering the rest-frame spectral range from 0.1 to 250um, and deep optical spectra of the sources associated with the extended emission. Two galaxies are associated with the Lya nebula. One of them is a dust enshrouded AGN, while the other is a powerful starburst, forming stars at >~600 Msol/yr. We detect the HeII emission line at 1640A in the spectrum of the obscured AGN, but detect no emission from other highly ionized metals (CIV or NV) as is expected from an AGN. One scenario that simultaneously reproduces the width of the detected emission lines, the lack of CIV emission, and the geometry of the emitting gas, is that the HeII and the Lya emission are the result of cooling gas that is being accreted on the dark matter halo of the two galaxies, Ly1 and Ly2. Given the complexity of the environment associated with our Lya nebula it is possible that various mechanisms of excitation are at work simultaneously.