• The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) is a high energy particle detector designed to study origin and nature of cosmic rays up to a few TV from space. It was installed on the International Space Station (ISS) on May 19, 2011. During the first two years of operation AMS-02 performed precise measurements of the proton flux. In the low rigidity range, from 1 GV to 20 GV, the proton flux was daily measured with a statistical error less than 1%. In the same rigidity range a gradual decrease due to Solar modulation effect and transit variations due to Solar Flares and Coronal Mass Ejection were also observed. In the rigidity range from 20 GV up to 100 GV instead, AMS-02 data show no drastic variation and the results are consistent with other experiments. Above 100 GV, AMS-02 proton flux exhibits a single power low behavior with no fine structures nor brakes.
  • In the space environment, instruments onboard of spacecrafts can be affected by displacement damage due to radiation. The differential scattering cross section for screened nucleus--nucleus interactions - i.e., including the effects due to screened Coulomb nuclear fields -, nuclear stopping powers and non-ionization energy losses are treated from about 50 keV/nucleon up to relativistic energies.
  • We used a backtracing code to reconstruct particle trajectory inside the Earth Magnetosphere during the last solar active period (2011 and 2012) when very high Solar Wind pressure values were measured. We compared our results on AMS-02 proton and electron data with 2 different External Field models, namely Tsyganenko 1996 (T96) and 2005 (T05), both for quiet (defined as the periods when the solar wind pressure is below the average value, set at 2nPa) and active periods. Although T05 has been specifically designed for storm events, at high energy the particle trajectory is similar for the two models. For instance at rigidities larger than 50 GV, the RMS of angular difference between reconstructed asymptotic direction outside the Magnetosphere is of the order of the millirad, while it increases at intermediate energies. We also confirmed, as a function of the pointing direction, the well known East-West effect on the trajectory of primary particles and on the access solid angle on the AMS detector.
  • Energetic (suprathermal) solar particles, accelerated in the interplanetary medium, contribute to the solar wind pressure, in particular during high solar activity periods. We estimated the effect of the increase of solar wind pressure due to suprathermal particles on magnetospheric transmissivity of galactic cosmic rays in the case of one recent solar event.
  • We implemented a website to deal with main effects on Cosmic Ray access to the Earth, i.e. the Solar Modulation and the Geomagnetic Field effect. In helmod.org the end user can easily access a web interface to results catalog of the HelMod Monte Carlo Code. This Model uses a Monte Carlo Approach to solves the Parker Transport Equation, obtaining a modulated proton flux for a period (monthly average) between January 1990 and december 2007. geomagsphere.org is instead based on GeoMag Backtracing Code, that solves the Lorentz equation with a Runge-Kutta method of 6th order, and, reversing charge sign and velocity, reconstruct particle trajectories in the Earth Magnetosphere back in time. We use last models of internal (IGRF-11) and external (Tsyganenko 1996 -T96- and 2005 -T05-) field components valid up to 2015. Particles are backtraced to the outer (magnetopause) or inner boundary to separate Primary (allowed trajectory) from Secondary (forbidden) Cosmic Rays. This code has been used both for reproducing known effects as East-West effect and rigidity cutoff calculations. In geomagsphere.org the user can choose the external field model from Tsyganenko (T96 or T05) and obtain for a fixed position and date from 1st Jan. 1968 (T96) and 1st Jan. 1995 (T05) respectively till 31$^{st}$ Dec 2012, the vertical rigidity cutoff estimation obtained with the backtracing technique with a rigidity step of 0.1 GV. For a more precise calculation (0.01 GV), requiring more CPU time, results are sent to the user by email (mail model)
  • The cosmic rays differential intensity inside the heliosphere, for energy below 30 GeV/nuc, depends on solar activity and interplanetary magnetic field polarity. This variation, termed solar modulation, is described using a 2-D (radius and colatitude) Monte Carlo approach for solving the Parker transport equation that includes diffusion, convection, magnetic drift and adiabatic energy loss. Since the whole transport is strongly related to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) structure, a better understanding of his description is needed in order to reproduce the cosmic rays intensity at the Earth, as well as outside the ecliptic plane. In this work an interplanetary magnetic field model including the standard description on ecliptic region and a polar correction is presented. This treatment of the IMF, implemented in the HelMod Monte Carlo code (version 2.0), was used to determine the effects on the differential intensity of Proton at 1\,AU and allowed one to investigate how latitudinal gradients of proton intensities, observed in the inner heliosphere with the Ulysses spacecraft during 1995, can be affected by the modification of the IMF in the polar regions.
  • Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) represent a promising alternative to classical photomultipliers, for instance, for the detection of photons in high energy physics and medical physics. In the present work, electrical characterizations of test devices - manufactured by ST Microelectronics - are presented. SiPMs with an area of 3.5x3.5 micron^2 and a cell pitch of 54 micron were manufactured as arrays of 64x64 cells and exhibiting a fill factor of 31%. The capacitance of SiPMs was measured as a function of reverse bias voltage at frequencies ranging from from 20 Hz up to 1 MHz and temperatures from 300 K down to 85 K. While leakage currents were measured at temperatures from 400 K down to 85 K. Thus, the threshold voltage - i.e., voltage corresponding to that at which the multiplication regime for the leakage current begins - could be determined as a function of temperature. Finally, an electrical model suited to reproduce the dependence of the frequency dependence of capacitance is presented.
  • The differential intensities of Cosmic Rays at Earth were calculated using a 2D stochastic Montecarlo diffusion code and compared with observation data. We evaluated the effect of stretched and compressed heliospheres on the Cosmic Ray intensities at the Earth. This was studied introducing a dependence of the diffusion parameter on the heliospherical size. Then, we found that the optimum value of the heliospherical radius better accounting for experimental data. We also found that the obtained values depends on solar activity. Our results are compatible with Voyager observations and with models of heliospherical size modulation.
  • The treatment of the electron-nucleus interaction based on the Mott differential cross section was extended to account for effects due to screened Coulomb potentials, finite sizes and finite rest masses of nuclei for electrons above 200 keV and up to ultra high energies. This treatment allows one to determine both the total and differential cross sections, thus, subsequently to calculate the resulting nuclear and non-ionizing stopping powers. Above a few hundreds of MeV, neglecting the effect due to finite rest masses of recoil nuclei the stopping power and NIEL result to be largely underestimated; while, above a few tens of MeV the finite size of the nuclear target prevents a further large increase of stopping powers which approach almost constant values.
  • A propagation model of galactic cosmic protons through the Heliosphere was implemented using a 2-D Monte Carlo approach to determine the differential intensities of protons during the solar cycle 23. The model includes the effects due to the variation of solar activity during the propagation of cosmic rays from the boundary of the heliopause down to Earth's position. Drift effects are also accounted for. The simulated spectra were found in agreement with those obtained with experimental observations carried out by BESS, AMS and PAMELA collaborations. In addition, the modulated spectrum determined with the present code for the year 1995 exhibits the latitudinal gradient and equatorial southward offset minimum found by Ulysses fast scan in 1995.
  • Spectra of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) measured at the Earth are the combination of several processes: sources production and acceleration, propagation in the interstellar medium and propagation in the heliosphere. Inside the solar cavity the flux of GCRs is reduced due to the solar modulation, the interaction which they have with the interplanetary medium. We realized a 2D stochastic simulation of solar modulation to reproduce CR spectra at the Earth, and evaluated the importance in our results of the Local Interstellar Spectrum (LIS) model and its agreement with data at high energy. We show a good agreement between our model and the data taken by AMS-01 and BESS experiments during periods with different solar activity conditions. Furthermore we made a prediction for the flux which will be measured by AMS-02 experiment.
  • We implemented a quasi time-dependent 2D stochastic model of solar modulation describing the transport of cosmic rays (CR) in the heliosphere. Our code can modulate the Local Interstellar Spectrum (LIS) of a generic charged particle (light cosmic ions and electrons), calculating the spectrum at 1AU. Several measurements of CR antiparticles have been performed. Here we focused our attention on the CR antiproton component and the antiproton over proton ratio. We show that our model, using the same heliospheric parameters for both particles, fit the observed anti-p/p ratio. We show a good agreement with BESS-97 and PAMELA data and make a prediction for the AMS-02 experiment.
  • Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) are mainly protons confined in the galactic magnetic field to form an isotropic flux inside the galaxy. Before reaching the Earth orbit they enter the Heliosphere and undergo diffusion, convection, magnetic drift and adiabatic energy loss. The result is a reduction of particles flux at low energy (below 10 GeV), called solar modulation. We realized a quasi time-dependent 2D Stochastic Simulation of Solar Modulation that is able to reproduce CR spectra once known the Local Interstellar Spectrum (LIS). We were able to estimate the different behaviors associated to the polarity dependence of the Heliospheric modulation for particles as well as for antiparticles. We show a good agreement with the antiproton/proton ratio measured by AMS-01, Pamela, BESS, Heat and Caprice and we performed a prediction for the AMS-02 Experiment.
  • The solar modulation, a combination of diffusion, convection, magnetic drift and energy loss inside the heliosphere is usually seen as a depletion in the Galactic cosmic ray (CR) flux at low energy (less than 10 GeV/nuc). Antiparticles such as antiprotons or positrons undergo the same processes of respective particles but with a different magnitude depending on the Solar magnetic field polarity. For electrons and positrons, due to the small mass, energy loss mechanisms as inverse compton, synchrotron, bremsstrahlung and ionization have to be taken into account, together with the typical adiabatic losses considered in the heliosphere. We developed a Monte Carlo stochastic simulation with the aim to compare the solar modulation of particles and antiparticles in the same observation period. We are able to estimate the different behaviours associated to the charge sign dependent processes of the heliospheric modulation. We compared the simulated positron fraction with measurements performed by AMS-01 and PAMELA. We also present the prediction for the AMS-02 experiment.