• This paper presents the mass assembly time scales of nearby galaxies observed by CALIFA at the 3.5m telescope in Calar Alto. We apply the fossil record method of the stellar populations to the complete sample of the 3rd CALIFA data release, with a total of 661 galaxies, covering stellar masses from 10$^{8.4}$ to 10$^{12}$ M$_{\odot}$ and a wide range of Hubble types. We apply spectral synthesis techniques to the datacubes and process the results to produce the mass growth time scales and mass weighted ages, from which we obtain temporal and spatially resolved information in seven bins of galaxy morphology and six bins of stellar mass (M$_{\star}$) and stellar mass surface density ($\Sigma_{\star}$). We use three different tracers of the spatially resolved star formation history (mass assembly curves, ratio of half mass to half light radii, and mass-weighted age gradients) to test if galaxies grow inside-out, and its dependence with galaxy stellar mass, $\Sigma_{\star}$, and morphology. Our main results are as follows: (a) The innermost regions of galaxies assemble their mass at an earlier time than regions located in the outer parts; this happens at any given M$_{\star}$, $\Sigma_{\star}$, or Hubble type, including the lowest mass systems. (b) Galaxies present a significant diversity in their characteristic formation epochs for lower-mass systems. This diversity shows a strong dependence of the mass assembly time scales on $\Sigma_{\star}$ and Hubble type in the lower-mass range (10$^{8.4}$ to 10$^{10.4}$), but a very mild dependence in higher-mass bins. (c) All galaxies show negative $\langle$log age$\rangle_{M}$ gradients in the inner 1 HLR. The profile flattens with increasing values of $\Sigma_{\star}$. There is no significant dependence on M$_{\star}$ within a particular $\Sigma_{\star}$ bin, except for the lowest bin, where the gradients becomes steeper.
  • The Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey, a pioneer in integral field spectroscopy legacy projects, has fostered many studies exploring the information encoded on the spatially resolved data on gaseous and stellar features in the optical range of galaxies. We describe a value-added catalogue of stellar population properties for CALIFA galaxies analysed with the spectral synthesis code STARLIGHT and processed with the PyCASSO platform. Our public data base (http://pycasso.ufsc.br/, mirror at http://pycasso.iaa.es/) comprises 445 galaxies from the CALIFA Data Release 3 with COMBO data. The catalogue provides maps for the stellar mass surface density, mean stellar ages and metallicities, stellar dust attenuation, star formation rates, and kinematics. Example applications both for individual galaxies and for statistical studies are presented to illustrate the power of this data set. We revisit and update a few of our own results on mass density radial profiles and on the local mass-metallicity relation. We also show how to employ the catalogue for new investigations, and show a pseudo Schmidt-Kennicutt relation entirely made with information extracted from the stellar continuum. Combinations to other databases are also illustrated. Among other results, we find a very good agreement between star formation rate surface densities derived from the stellar continuum and the $\mathrm{H}\alpha$ emission. This public catalogue joins the scientific community's effort towards transparency and reproducibility, and will be useful for researchers focusing on (or complementing their studies with) stellar properties of CALIFA galaxies.
  • This paper presents the spatially resolved star formation history (2D-SFH) of a small sample of four local mergers: the early-stage mergers IC1623, NGC6090, and the Mice, and the more advanced merger NGC2623, by analyzing IFS data from the CALIFA survey and PMAS in LArr mode. Full spectral fitting techniques are applied to the datacubes to obtain the spatially resolved mass growth histories, the time evolution of the star formation rate intensity ($\Sigma_{SFR}$), and the local specific star formation rate, over three different timescales (30 Myr, 300 Myr, and 1 Gyr). The results are compared with non-interacting Sbc--Sc galaxies, to quantify if there is an enhancement of the star formation and to trace its time scale and spatial extent. Our results for the three LIRGs (IC1623W, NGC6090, and NGC2623) show that a major phase of star formation is occurring in time scales of 10$^{7}$ yr to few 10$^{8}$ yr, with global SFR enhancements of $\sim$2--6 with respect to main-sequence star forming (MSSF) galaxies. In the two early-stage mergers IC1623W and NGC6090, which are between first pericenter passage and coalescence, the most remarkable increase of the SFR with respect to non-interacting spirals occurred in the last 30 Myr, and it is spatially extended, with enhancements of factors 2--7 both in the centres ($r <$ 0.5 half light radius, HLR), and in the disks ($r >$ 1 HLR). In the more advanced merger NGC 2623 an extended phase of star formation occurred on a longer time-scale of $\sim$1 Gyr, with a SFR enhancement of a factor $\sim$2--3 larger than the one in Sbc--Sc MSSF galaxies over the same period, probably relic of the first pericenter passage epoch. A SFR enhancement in the last 30 Myr is also present, but only in NGC2623 centre, by a factor 3. In general, the spatially resolved SFHs of the LIRG-mergers are consistent with the predictions from high spatial resolution simulations.
  • This paper presents the spatially resolved star formation history (SFH) of nearby galaxies with the aim of furthering our understanding of the different processes involved in the formation and evolution of galaxies. To this end, we apply the fossil record method of stellar population synthesis to a rich and diverse data set of 436 galaxies observed with integral field spectroscopy in the CALIFA survey. The sample covers a wide range of Hubble types, with stellar masses ranging from $M_\star \sim 10^9$ to $7 \times 10^{11} M_\odot$. Spectral synthesis techniques are applied to the datacubes to retrieve the spatially resolved time evolution of the star formation rate (SFR), its intensity ($\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$), and other descriptors of the 2D-SFH in seven bins of galaxy morphology (E, S0, Sa, Sb, Sbc, Sc, and Sd), and five bins of stellar mass. Our main results are: a) Galaxies form very fast independently of their current stellar mass, with the peak of star formation at high redshift ($z > 2$). Subsequent star formation is driven by $M_\star$ and morphology, with less massive and later type spirals showing more prolonged periods of star formation. b) At any epoch in the past the SFR is proportional to $M_\star$, with most massive galaxies having the highest absolute (but lowest specific) SFRs. c) While nowadays $\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ is similar for all spirals, and significantly lower in early type galaxies (ETG), in the past $\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ scales well with morphology. The central regions of today's ETGs are where $\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ reached the highest values ($> 10^3 \,M_\odot\,$Gyr$^{-1}\,$pc$^{-2}$), similar to those measured in high redshift star forming galaxies. d) The evolution of $\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ in Sbc systems matches that of models for Milky-Way-like galaxies, suggesting that the formation of a thick disk may be a common phase in spirals at early epochs.
  • We report on a detailed study of the stellar populations and ionized gas properties in the merger LIRG NGC 2623, analysing optical Integral Field Spectroscopy from the CALIFA survey and PMAS LArr, multiwavelength HST imaging, and OSIRIS narrow band H$\alpha$ and [NII]$\lambda$6584 imaging. The spectra were processed with the STARLIGHT full spectral fitting code, and the results compared with those for two early-stage merger LIRGs (IC 1623 W and NGC 6090), together with CALIFA Sbc/Sc galaxies. We find that NGC 2623 went through two periods of increased star formation (SF), a first and widespread episode, traced by intermediate-age stellar populations ISP (140 Myr-1.4 Gyr), and a second one, traced by young stellar populations YSP ($<$140 Myr), which is concentrated in the central regions ($<$1.4 kpc). Our results are in agreement with the epochs of the first peri-center passage ($\sim$200 Myr ago) and coalescence ($<$100 Myr ago) predicted by dynamical models, and with high resolution merger simulations in the literature, consistent with NGC 2623 representing an evolved version of the early-stage mergers. Most ionized gas is concentrated within $<$2.8 kpc, where LINER-like ionization and high velocity dispersion ($\sim$220 km/s) are found, consistent with the previously reported outflow. As revealed by the highest resolution OSIRIS and HST data, a collection of HII regions is also present in the plane of the galaxy, which explains the mixture of ionization mechanisms in this system. It is unlikely that the outflow in NGC 2623 will escape from the galaxy, given the low SFR intensity ($\sim$0.5 M$_{\odot}$yr$^{-1}$kpc$^{-2}$), the fact that the outflow rate is 3 times lower than the current SFR, and the escape velocity in the central areas higher than the outflow velocity.
  • The role of major mergers in galaxy evolution is investigated through a detailed characterization of the stellar populations, ionized gas properties, and star formation rates (SFR) in the early-stage merger LIRGs IC 1623 W and NGC 6090, by analysing optical Integral Field Spectroscopy (IFS) and high resolution HST imaging. The spectra were processed with the Starlight full spectral fitting code, and the emission lines measured in the residual spectra. The results are compared with control non-interacting spiral galaxies from the CALIFA survey. Merger-induced star formation is extended and recent, as revealed by the young ages (50-80 Myr) and high contributions to light of young stellar populations (50-90$\%$), in agreement with merger simulations in the literature. These early-stage mergers have positive central gradients of the stellar metallicity, with an average $\sim$0.6 Z$_{\odot}$. Compared to non-interacting spirals, they have lower central nebular metallicity, and flatter profiles, in agreement with the gas inflow scenario. We find that they are dominated by star formation, although shock excitation cannot be discarded in some regions, where high velocity dispersion is found (170-200 km s$^{-1}$). The average SFR in these early-stage mergers ($\sim$23-32 M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$) is enhanced with respect to main-sequence Sbc galaxies by factors of 6-9, slightly above the predictions from classical merger simulations, but still possible in about 15$\%$ of major galaxy mergers, where U/LIRGs belong.
  • The aim of this paper is to characterize the radial structure of the star formation rate (SFR) in galaxies in the nearby Universe as represented by the CALIFA survey. The sample under study contains 416 galaxies observed with IFS, covering a wide range of Hubble types and stellar masses. Spectral synthesis techniques are applied to obtain radial profiles of the intensity of the star formation rate in the recent past, and the local sSFR. To emphasize the behavior of these properties for galaxies that are on and off the main sequence of star formation (MSSF) we stack the individual radial profiles in bins of galaxy morphology and stellar masses. Our main results are: a) The intensity of SFR shows declining profiles that exhibit very little differences between spirals. The dispersion between the profiles is significantly smaller in late type spirals. This confirms that the MSSF is a sequence of galaxies with nearly constant intensity of SFR b) sSFR values scale with Hubble type and increase radially outwards, with a steeper slope in the inner 1 HLR. This behavior suggests that galaxies are quenched inside-out, and that this process is faster in the central, bulge-dominated part than in the disks. c) As a whole, and at all radii, E and S0 are off the MSSF. d) Applying the volume-corrections for the CALIFA sample, we obtain a density of star formation in the local Universe of 0.0105 Msun/yr/Mpc^{-3}. Most of the star formation is occurring in the disks of spirals. e) The volume averaged birthrate parameter, b'=0.39, suggests that the present day Universe is forming stars at 1/3 of its past average rate. E, S0, and the bulge of early type spirals contribute little to the recent SFR of the Universe, which is dominated by the disks of later spirals. f) There is a tight relation between the intensity of the SFR and stellar mass, defining a local MSSF relation with a logarithmic slope of 0.8.
  • We present an extended version of the spectral synthesis code STARLIGHT designed to incorporate both $\lambda$-by-$\lambda$ spectra and photometric fluxes in the estimation of stellar population properties of galaxies. The code is tested with simulations and data for 260 galaxies culled from the CALIFA survey, spatially matching the 3700--7000 \AA\ optical datacubes to GALEX near and far UV images. The sample spans E--Sd galaxies with masses from $10^9$ to $10^{12} M_\odot$ and stellar populations all the way from star-forming to old, passive systems. Comparing results derived from purely optical fits with those which also consider the NUV and FUV data we find that: (1) The new code is capable of matching the input UV data within the errors while keeping the quality of the optical fit essentially unchanged. (2) Despite being unreliable predictors of the UV fluxes, purely optical fits yield stellar population properties which agree well with those obtained in optical+UV fits for nearly 90% of our sample. (3) The addition of UV constraints has little impact on properties such as stellar mass and dust optical depth. Mean stellar ages and metallicities also remain nearly the same for most galaxies, the exception being low-mass, late-type galaxies, which become older and less enriched due to rearrangements of their youngest populations. (4) The revised ages are better correlated with observables such as the 4000 \AA\ break index, and the $NUV - r$ and $u - r$ colours, an empirical indication that the addition of UV constraints helps mitigating the effects of age-metallicity-extinction degeneracies.
  • This paper characterizes the radial structure of stellar population properties of galaxies in the nearby universe, based on 300 galaxies from the CALIFA survey. The sample covers a wide range of Hubble types, and galaxy stellar mass. We apply the spectral synthesis techniques to recover the stellar mass surface density, stellar extinction, light and mass-weighted ages, and mass-weighted metallicity, for each spatial resolution element in our target galaxies. To study mean trends with overall galaxy properties, the individual radial profiles are stacked in seven bins of galaxy morphology. We confirm that more massive galaxies are more compact, older, more metal rich, and less reddened by dust. Additionally, we find that these trends are preserved spatially with the radial distance to the nucleus. Deviations from these relations appear correlated with Hubble type: earlier types are more compact, older, and more metal rich for a given mass, which evidences that quenching is related to morphology, but not driven by mass. Negative gradients of ages are consistent with an inside-out growth of galaxies, with the largest ages gradients in Sb-Sbc galaxies. Further, the mean stellar ages of disks and bulges are correlated, with disks covering a wider range of ages, and late type spirals hosting younger disks. The gradients in stellar mass surface density depend mostly on stellar mass, in the sense that more massive galaxies are more centrally concentrated. There is a secondary correlation in the sense that at the same mass early type galaxies have steeper gradients. We find mildly negative metallicity gradients, shallower than predicted from models of galaxy evolution in isolation. The largest gradients occur in Sb galaxies. Overall we conclude that quenching processes act in manners that are independent of mass, while metallicity and galaxy structure are influenced by mass-dependent processes.
  • We present spatially resolved stellar and/or ionized gas kinematic properties for a sample of 103 interacting galaxies, tracing all merger stages: close companions, pairs with morphological signatures of interaction, and coalesced merger remnants. We compare our sample with 80 non-interacting galaxies. We measure for the stellar and the ionized gas components the major (projected) kinematic position angles (PA$_{\mathrm{kin}}$, approaching and receding) directly from the velocity fields with no assumptions on the internal motions. This method allow us to derive the deviations of the kinematic PAs from a straight line ($\delta$PA$_{\mathrm{kin}}$). Around half of the interacting objects show morpho-kinematic PA misalignments that cannot be found in the control sample. Those misalignments are present mostly in galaxies with morphological signatures of interaction. Alignment between the kinematic sides for both samples is similar, with most of the galaxies displaying small misalignments. Radial deviations of the kinematic PA from a straight line in the stellar component measured by $\delta$PA$_{\mathrm{kin}}$ are large for both samples. However, for a large fraction of interacting galaxies the ionized gas $\delta$PA$_{\mathrm{kin}}$ is larger than typical values derived from isolated galaxies (48%), making this parameter a good indicator to trace the impact of interaction and mergers in the internal motions of galaxies. By comparing the stellar and ionized gas kinematic PA, we find that 42% (28/66) of the interacting galaxies have misalignments larger than 16 degrees, compared to 10% from the control sample. Our results show the impact of interactions in the internal structure of galaxies as well as the wide variety of their velocity distributions. This study also provides a local Universe benchmark for kinematic studies in merging galaxies at high redshift.
  • We characterize in detail the radial structure of the stellar population properties of 300 galaxies in the nearby universe, observed with integral field spectroscopy in the CALIFA survey. The sample covers a wide range of Hubble types, from spheroidal to spiral galaxies, ranging in stellar masses from $M_\star \sim 10^9$ to $7 \times 10^{11}$ $M_\odot$. We derive the stellar mass surface density ($\mu_\star$), light-weighted and mass-weighted ages ($\langle {\rm log}\,age\rangle _L$, $\langle {\rm log}\,age\rangle _M$), and mass-weighted metallicity ($\langle {\rm log}\,Z_\star\rangle _M$), applying the spectral synthesis technique. We study the mean trends with galaxy stellar mass, $M_\star$, and morphology (E, S0, Sa, Sb, Sbc, Sc and Sd). We confirm that more massive galaxies are more compact, older, more metal rich, and less reddened by dust. Additionally, we find that these trends are preserved spatially with the radial distance to the nucleus. Deviations from these relations appear correlated with Hubble type: earlier types are more compact, older, and more metal rich for a given M$_\star$, which evidences that quenching is related to morphology, but not driven by mass.
  • We carry out a direct search for bar-like non-circular flows in intermediate-inclination, gas-rich disk galaxies with a range of morphological types and photometric bar classifications from the first data release (DR1) of the CALIFA survey. We use the DiskFit algorithm to apply rotation only and bisymmetric flow models to H$\alpha$ velocity fields for 49/100 CALIFA DR1 systems that meet our selection criteria. We find satisfactory fits for a final sample of 37 systems. DiskFit is sensitive to the radial or tangential components of a bar-like flow with amplitudes greater than $15\,$km$\,$s$^{-1}$ across at least two independent radial bins in the fit, or ~2.25 kpc at the characteristic final sample distance of ~75 Mpc. The velocity fields of 25/37 $(67.6^{+6.6}_{-8.5}\%)$ galaxies are best characterized by pure rotation, although only 17/25 $(68.0^{+7.7}_{-10.4}\%)$ of them have sufficient H$\alpha$ emission near the galaxy centre to afford a search for non-circular flows. We detect non-circular flows in the remaining 12/37 $(32.4^{+8.5}_{-6.6}\%)$ galaxies. We conclude that the non-circular flows detected in 11/12 $(91.7^{+2.8}_{-14.9}\%)$ systems stem from bars. Galaxies with intermediate (AB) bars are largely undetected, and our detection thresholds therefore represent upper limits to the amplitude of the non-circular flows therein. We find 2/23 $(8.7^{+9.6}_{-2.9}\%)$ galaxies that show non-circular motions consistent with a bar-like flow, yet no photometric bar is evident. This suggests that in ~10% of galaxies either the existence of a bar may be missed completely in photometry or other processes may drive bar-like flows and thus secular galaxy evolution.
  • The bar pattern speed ($\Omega_{\rm b}$) is defined as the rotational frequency of the bar, and it determines the bar dynamics. Several methods have been proposed for measuring $\Omega_{\rm b}$. The non-parametric method proposed by Tremaine \& Weinberg (1984; TW) and based on stellar kinematics is the most accurate. This method has been applied so far to 17 galaxies, most of them SB0 and SBa types. We have applied the TW method to a new sample of 15 strong and bright barred galaxies, spanning a wide range of morphological types from SB0 to SBbc. Combining our analysis with previous studies, we investigate 32 barred galaxies with their pattern speed measured by the TW method. The resulting total sample of barred galaxies allows us to study the dependence of $\Omega_{\rm b}$ on galaxy properties, such as the Hubble type. We measured $\Omega_{\rm b}$ using the TW method on the stellar velocity maps provided by the integral-field spectroscopy data from the CALIFA survey. Integral-field data solve the problems that long-slit data present when applying the TW method, resulting in the determination of more accurate $\Omega_{\rm b}$. In addition, we have also derived the ratio $\cal{R}$ of the corotation radius to the bar length of the galaxies. According to this parameter, bars can be classified as fast ($\cal{R}$ $< 1.4$) and slow ($\cal{R}$>1.4). For all the galaxies, $\cal{R}$ is compatible within the errors with fast bars. We cannot rule out (at 95$\%$ level) the fast bar solution for any galaxy. We have not observed any significant trend between $\cal{R}$ and the galaxy morphological type. Our results indicate that independent of the Hubble type, bars have been formed and then evolve as fast rotators. This observational result will constrain the scenarios of formation and evolution of bars proposed by numerical simulations.
  • We analyze the spatially resolved star formation history of 300 nearby galaxies from the CALIFA integral field spectroscopic survey to investigate the radial structure and gradients of the present day stellar populations properties as a function of Hubble type and galaxy stellar mass. A fossil record method based on spectral synthesis techniques is used to recover spatially and temporally resolved maps of stellar population properties of spheroidal and spiral galaxies with masses $10^9$ to $7 \times 10^{11}$ M$_\odot$. The results show that galaxy-wide spatially averaged stellar population properties (stellar mass, mass surface density, age, metallicity, and extinction) match those obtained from the integrated spectrum, and that these spatially averaged properties match those at $R = 1$ HLR (half light radius), proving that the effective radii are really effective. Further, the individual radial profiles of the stellar mass surface density ($\mu_\star$), luminosity weighted ages ($< {\rm log}\,age>_L$), and mass weighted metallicity ($< \log Z_\star >_M$) are stacked in bins of galaxy morphology (E, S0, Sa, Sb, Sbc, Sc and Sd). All these properties show negative gradients as a sign of the inside-out growth of massive galaxies. However, the gradients depend on the Hubble type in different ways. For the same galaxy mass, E and S0 galaxies show the largest inner gradients in $\mu_\star$; while MW-like galaxies (Sb with $M_\star \sim 10^{11} M_\odot$) show the largest inner age and metallicity gradients. The age and metallicity gradients suggest that major mergers have a relevant role in growing the center (within 3 HLR) of massive early type galaxies; and radial mixing may play a role flattening the radial metallicity gradient in MW-like disks.
  • We resolve spatially the star formation history of 300 nearby galaxies from the CALIFA integral field survey to investigate: a) the radial structure and gradients of the present stellar populations properties as a function of the Hubble type; and b) the role that plays the galaxy stellar mass and stellar mass surface density in governing the star formation history and metallicity enrichment of spheroids and the disks of galaxies. We apply the fossil record method based on spectral synthesis techniques to recover spatially and temporally resolved maps of stellar population properties of spheroids and spirals with galaxy mass from 10$^9$ to 7$\times$10$^{11}$ M$_{\odot}$. The individual radial profiles of the stellar mass surface density ($\mu_{*}$), stellar extinction (A$_{V}$), luminosity weighted ages ($\langle$ log age $\rangle_{L}$), and mass weighted metallicity ($\langle$ log Z/Z$_{\odot}$$\rangle_{M}$) are stacked in seven bins of galaxy morphology (E, S0, Sa, Sb, Sbc, Sc and Sd). All these properties show negative gradients as a sight of the inside-out growth of massive galaxies. However, the gradients depend on the Hubble type in different ways. For the same galaxy mass, E and S0 galaxies show the largest inner gradients in $\mu_{*}$; and Andromeda-like galaxies (Sb with log M$_{*}$(M$_{\odot}$) $\sim$ 11) show the largest inner age and metallicity gradients. In average, spiral galaxies have a stellar metallicity gradient $\sim$ -0.1 dex per half-light radius, in agreement with the value estimated for the ionized gas oxygen abundance gradient by CALIFA. A global (M$_{*}$-driven) and local ($\mu_{*}$- driven) stellar metallicity relation are derived. We find that in disks, the stellar mass surface density regulates the stellar metallicity; in spheroids, the galaxy stellar mass dominates the physics of star formation and chemical enrichment.
  • Methods to recover the fossil record of galaxy evolution encoded in their optical spectra have been instrumental in processing the avalanche of data from mega-surveys along the last decade, effectively transforming observed spectra onto a long and rich list of physical properties: from stellar masses and mean ages to full star formation histories. This promoted progress in our understanding of galaxies as a whole. Yet, the lack of spatial resolution introduces undesirable aperture effects, and hampers advances on the internal physics of galaxies. This is now changing with 3D surveys. The mapping of stellar populations in data-cubes allows us to figure what comes from where, unscrambling information previously available only in integrated form. This contribution uses our starlight-based analysis of 300 CALIFA galaxies to illustrate the power of spectral synthesis applied to data-cubes. The selected results highlighted here include: (a) The evolution of the mass-metallicity and mass-density-metallicity relations, as traced by the mean stellar metallicity. (b) A comparison of star formation rates obtained from H{\alpha} to those derived from full spectral fits. (c) The relation between star formation rate and dust optical depth within galaxies, which turns out to mimic the Schmidt-Kennicutt law. (d) PCA tomography experiments.
  • This work provides an overall characterization of the kinematic behavior of the ionized gas of the galaxies included in the Calar Alto Legacy Integral field Area (CALIFA), offering kinematic clues to potential users of this survey for including kinematical criteria for specific studies. From the first 200 galaxies observed by CALIFA, we present the 2D kinematic view of the 177 galaxies satisfying a gas detection threshold. After removing the stellar contribution, we used the cross-correlation technique to obtain the radial velocity of the dominant gaseous component. The main kinematic parameters were directly derived from the radial velocities with no assumptions on the internal motions. Evidence of the presence of several gaseous components with different kinematics were detected by using [OIII] profiles. Most objects in the sample show regular velocity fields, although the ionized-gas kinematics are rarely consistent with simple coplanar circular motions. 35% of the objects present evidence of a displacement between the photometric and kinematic centers larger than the original spaxel radii. Only 17% of the objects in the sample exhibit kinematic lopsidedness when comparing receding and approaching sides of the velocity fields, but most of them are interacting galaxies exhibiting nuclear activity. Early-type galaxies in the sample present clear photometric-kinematic misaligments. There is evidence of asymmetries in the emission line profiles suggesting the presence of kinematically distinct gaseous components at different distances from the nucleus. This work constitutes the first determination of the ionized gas kinematics of the galaxies observed in the CALIFA survey. The derived velocity fields, the reported kinematic peculiarities and the identification of the presence of several gaseous components might be used as additional criteria for selecting galaxies for specific studies.
  • We use spatially and temporally resolved maps of stellar population properties of 300 galaxies from the CALIFA integral field survey to investigate how the stellar metallicity (Z*) relates to the total stellar mass (M*) and the local mass surface density ($\mu$*) in both spheroidal and disk dominated galaxies. The galaxies are shown to follow a clear stellar mass-metallicity relation (MZR) over the whole 10$^9$ to 10$^{12}$ M$_{\odot}$ range. This relation is steeper than the one derived from nebular abundances, which is similar to the flatter stellar MZR derived when we consider only young stars. We also find a strong relation between the local values of $\mu$* and Z* (the $\mu$ZR), betraying the influence of local factors in determining Z*. This shows that both local ($\mu$*-driven) and global (M*-driven) processes are important in determining the metallicity in galaxies. We find that the overall balance between local and global effects varies with the location within a galaxy. In disks, $\mu$* regulates Z*, producing a strong $\mu$ZR whose amplitude is modulated by M*. In spheroids it is M* who dominates the physics of star formation and chemical enrichment, with $\mu$* playing a minor, secondary role. These findings agree with our previous analysis of the star formation histories of CALIFA galaxies, which showed that mean stellar ages are mainly governed by surface density in galaxy disks and by total mass in spheroids.
  • We present the largest and most homogeneous catalog of HII regions and associations compiled so far. The catalog comprises more than 7000 ionized regions, extracted from 306 galaxies observed by the CALIFA survey. We describe the procedures used to detect, select, and analyse the spectroscopic properties of these ionized regions. In the current study we focus on the characterization of the radial gradient of the oxygen abundance in the ionized gas, based on the study of the deprojected distribution of HII regions. We found that all galaxies without clear evidence of an interaction present a common gradient in the oxygen abundance, with a characteristic slope of alpha = -0.1 dex/re between 0.3 and 2 disk effective radii, and a scatter compatible with random fluctuations around this value, when the gradient is normalized to the disk effective radius. The slope is independent of morphology, incidence of bars, absolute magnitude or mass. Only those galaxies with evidence of interactions and/or clear merging systems present a significant shallower gradient, consistent with previous results. The majority of the 94 galaxies with H ii regions detected beyond 2 disk effective radii present a flattening in the oxygen abundance. The flattening is statistically significant. We cannot provide with a conclusive answer regarding the origin of this flattening. However, our results indicate that its origin is most probably related to the secular evolution of galaxies. Finally, we find a drop/truncation of the oxygen abundance in the inner regions for 26 of the galaxies. All of them are non-interacting, mostly unbarred, Sb/Sbc galaxies. This feature is associated with a central star-forming ring, which suggests that both features are produced by radial gas flows induced by resonance processes.
  • We study the radial structure of the stellar mass surface density ($\mu$) and stellar population age as a function of the total stellar mass and morphology for a sample of 107 galaxies from the CALIFA survey. We use the fossil record to recover the star formation history (SFH) in spheroidal and disk dominated galaxies with masses from 10$^9$ to 10$^{12}$ M$_\odot$. We derive the half mass radius, and we find that galaxies are on average 15% more compact in mass than in light. HMR/HLR decreases with increasing mass for disk galaxies, but is almost constant in spheroidal galaxies. We find that the galaxy-averaged stellar population age, stellar extinction, and $\mu$ are well represented by their values at 1 HLR. Negative radial gradients of the stellar population ages support an inside-out formation. The larger inner age gradients occur in the most massive disk galaxies that have the most prominent bulges; shallower age gradients are obtained in spheroids of similar mass. Disk and spheroidal galaxies show negative $\mu$ gradients that steepen with stellar mass. In spheroidal galaxies $\mu$ saturates at a critical value that is independent of the galaxy mass. Thus, all the massive spheroidal galaxies have similar local $\mu$ at the same radius (in HLR units). The SFH of the regions beyond 1 HLR are well correlated with their local $\mu$, and follow the same relation as the galaxy-averaged age and $\mu$; suggesting that local stellar mass surface density preserves the SFH of disks. The SFH of bulges are, however, more fundamentally related to the total stellar mass, since the radial structure of the stellar age changes with galaxy mass even though all the spheroid dominated galaxies have similar radial structure in $\mu$. Thus, galaxy mass is a more fundamental property in spheroidal systems while the local stellar mass surface density is more important in disks.
  • The growth of galaxies is one of the key problems in understanding the structure and evolution of the universe and its constituents. Galaxies can grow their stellar mass by accretion of halo or intergalactic gas clouds, or by merging with smaller or similar mass galaxies. The gas available translates into a rate of star formation, which controls the generation of metals in the universe. The spatially resolved history of their stellar mass assembly has not been obtained so far for any given galaxy beyond the Local Group. Here we demonstrate how massive galaxies grow their stellar mass inside-out. We report the results from the analysis of the first 105 galaxies of the largest to date three-dimensional spectroscopic survey of galaxies in the local universe (CALIFA). We apply the fossil record method of stellar population spectral synthesis to recover the spatially and time resolved star formation history of each galaxy. We show, for the first time, that the signal of downsizing is spatially preserved, with both inner and outer regions growing faster for more massive galaxies. Further, we show that the relative growth rate of the spheroidal component, nucleus and inner galaxy, that happened 5-7 Gyr ago, shows a maximum at a critical stellar mass ~10^10 Msun. We also find that galaxies less massive than ~10^10 Msun show a transition to outside-in growth, thus connecting with results from resolved studies of the growth of low mass galaxies.
  • We present here the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey, which has been designed to provide a first step in this direction.We summarize the survey goals and design, including sample selection and observational strategy.We also showcase the data taken during the first observing runs (June/July 2010) and outline the reduction pipeline, quality control schemes and general characteristics of the reduced data. This survey is obtaining spatially resolved spectroscopic information of a diameter selected sample of $\sim600$ galaxies in the Local Universe (0.005< z <0.03). CALIFA has been designed to allow the building of two-dimensional maps of the following quantities: (a) stellar populations: ages and metallicities; (b) ionized gas: distribution, excitation mechanism and chemical abundances; and (c) kinematic properties: both from stellar and ionized gas components. CALIFA uses the PPAK Integral Field Unit (IFU), with a hexagonal field-of-view of $\sim1.3\sq\arcmin'$, with a 100% covering factor by adopting a three-pointing dithering scheme. The optical wavelength range is covered from 3700 to 7000 {\AA}, using two overlapping setups (V500 and V1200), with different resolutions: R\sim850 and R\sim1650, respectively. CALIFA is a legacy survey, intended for the community. The reduced data will be released, once the quality has been guaranteed. The analyzed data fulfill the expectations of the original observing proposal, on the basis of a set of quality checks and exploratory analysis. We conclude from this first look at the data that CALIFA will be an important resource for archaeological studies of galaxies in the Local Universe.