• We present a deep survey of the SuperCLASS super-cluster - a region of sky known to contain five Abell clusters at redshift $z\sim0.2$ - performed using the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI) Large Array (LA) at 15.5$~$GHz. Our survey covers an area of approximately 0.9 square degrees. We achieve a nominal sensitivity of $32.0~\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ toward the field centre, finding 80 sources above a $5\sigma$ threshold. We derive the radio colour-colour distribution for sources common to three surveys that cover the field and identify three sources with strongly curved spectra - a high-frequency-peaked source and two GHz-peaked-spectrum sources. The differential source count (i) agrees well with previous deep radio source count, (ii) exhibits no evidence of an emerging population of star-forming galaxies, down to a limit of 0.24$~$mJy, and (iii) disagrees with some models of the 15$~$GHz source population. However, our source count is in agreement with recent work that provides an analytical correction to the source count from the SKADS Simulated Sky, supporting the suggestion that this discrepancy is caused by an abundance of flat-spectrum galaxy cores as-yet not included in source population models.
  • We present the results of 325 MHz GMRT observations of a super-cluster field, known to contain five Abell clusters at redshift $z \sim 0.2$. We achieve a nominal sensitivity of $34\,\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ toward the phase centre. We compile a catalogue of 3257 sources with flux densities in the range $183\,\mu\rm{Jy}\,-\,1.5\,\rm{Jy}$ within the entire $\sim 6.5$ square degree field of view. Subsequently, we use available survey data at other frequencies to derive the spectral index distribution for a sub-sample of these sources, recovering two distinct populations -- a dominant population which exhibit spectral index trends typical of steep-spectrum synchrotron emission, and a smaller population of sources with typically flat or rising spectra. We identify a number of sources with ultra-steep spectra or rising spectra for further analysis, finding two candidate high-redshift radio galaxies and three gigahertz-peaked-spectrum radio sources. Finally, we derive the Euclidean-normalised differential source counts using the catalogue compiled in this work, for sources with flux densities in excess of $223 \, \mu$Jy. Our differential source counts are consistent with both previous observations at this frequency and models of the low-frequency source population. These represent the deepest source counts yet derived at 325 MHz. Our source counts exhibit the well-known flattening at mJy flux densities, consistent with an emerging population of star-forming galaxies; we also find marginal evidence of a downturn at flux densities below $308 \, \mu$Jy, a feature so far only seen at 1.4 GHz.
  • We outline the prospects for performing pioneering radio weak gravitational lensing analyses using observations from a potential forthcoming JVLA Sky Survey program. A large-scale survey with the JVLA can offer interesting and unique opportunities for performing weak lensing studies in the radio band, a field which has until now been the preserve of optical telescopes. In particular, the JVLA has the capacity for large, deep radio surveys with relatively high angular resolution, which are the key characteristics required for a successful weak lensing study. We highlight the potential advantages and unique aspects of performing weak lensing in the radio band. In particular, the inclusion of continuum polarisation information can greatly reduce noise in weak lensing reconstructions and can also remove the effects of intrinsic galaxy alignments, the key astrophysical systematic effect that limits weak lensing at all wavelengths. We identify a VLASS "deep fields" program (total area ~10-20 square degs), to be conducted at L-band and with high-resolution (A-array configuration), as the optimal survey strategy from the point of view of weak lensing science. Such a survey will build on the unique strengths of the JVLA and will remain unsurpassed in terms of its combination of resolution and sensitivity until the advent of the Square Kilometre Array. We identify the best fields on the JVLA-accessible sky from the point of view of overlapping with existing deep optical and near infra-red data which will provide crucial redshift information and facilitate a host of additional compelling multi-wavelength science.