• The nearby and young M star AU Mic is surrounded by a debris disk in which we previously identified a series of large-scale arch-like structures that have never been seen before in any other debris disk and that move outward at high velocities. We initiated a monitoring program with the following objectives: 1) track the location of the structures and better constrain their projected speeds, 2) search for new features emerging closer in, and ultimately 3) understand the mechanism responsible for the motion and production of the disk features. AU Mic was observed at 11 different epochs between August 2014 and October 2017 with the IR camera and spectrograph of SPHERE. These high-contrast imaging data were processed with a variety of angular, spectral, and polarimetric differential imaging techniques to reveal the faintest structures in the disk. We measured the projected separations of the features in a systematic way for all epochs. We also applied the very same measurements to older observations from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) with the visible cameras STIS and ACS. The main outcomes of this work are 1) the recovery of the five southeastern broad arch-like structures we identified in our first study, and confirmation of their fast motion (projected speed in the range 4-12 km/s); 2) the confirmation that the very first structures observed in 2004 with ACS are indeed connected to those observed later with STIS and now SPHERE; 3) the discovery of two new very compact structures at the northwest side of the disk (at 0.40" and 0.55" in May 2015) that move to the southeast at low speed; and 4) the identification of a new arch-like structure that might be emerging at the southeast side at about 0.4" from the star (as of May 2016). Abridged.
  • We report the discovery of a bright, brown dwarf companion to the star HIP 64892, imaged with VLT/SPHERE during the SHINE exoplanet survey. The host is a B9.5V member of the Lower-Centaurus-Crux subgroup of the Scorpius Centaurus OB association. The measured angular separation of the companion ($1.2705\pm0.0023$") corresponds to a projected distance of $159\pm12$ AU. We observed the target with the dual-band imaging and long-slit spectroscopy modes of the IRDIS imager to obtain its SED and astrometry. In addition, we reprocessed archival NACO L-band data, from which we also recover the companion. Its SED is consistent with a young (<30 Myr), low surface gravity object with a spectral type of M9$_{\gamma}\pm1$. From comparison with the BT-Settl atmospheric models we estimate an effective temperature of $T_{\textrm{eff}}=2600 \pm 100$ K, and comparison of the companion photometry to the COND evolutionary models yields a mass of $\sim29-37$ M$_{\text{J}}$ at the estimated age of $16^{+15}_{-7}$ Myr for the system. HIP 64892 is a rare example of an extreme-mass ratio system ($q\sim0.01$) and will be useful for testing models relating to the formation and evolution of such low-mass objects.
  • Transition disks are considered sites of ongoing planet formation, and their dust and gas distributions could be signposts of embedded planets. The transition disk around the T Tauri star RY Lup has an inner dust cavity and displays a strong silicate emission feature. Using high-resolution imaging we study the disk geometry, including non-axisymmetric features, and its surface dust grain, to gain a better understanding of the disk evolutionary process. Moreover, we search for companion candidates, possibly connected to the disk. We obtained high-contrast and high angular resolution data in the near-infrared with the VLT/SPHERE extreme adaptive optics instrument whose goal is to study the planet formation by detecting and characterizing these planets and their formation environments through direct imaging. We performed polarimetric imaging of the RY~Lup disk with IRDIS (at 1.6 microns), and obtained intensity images with the IRDIS dual-band imaging camera simultaneously with the IFS spectro-imager (0.9-1.3 microns). We resolved for the first time the scattered light from the nearly edge-on circumstellar disk around RY~Lup, at projected separations in the 100 \,au range. The shape of the disk and its sharp features are clearly detectable at wavelengths ranging from 0.9 to 1.6 microns. We show that the observed morphology can be interpreted as spiral arms in the disk. This interpretation is supported by in-depth numerical simulations. We also demonstrate that these features can be produced by one planet interacting with the disk. We also detect several point sources which are classified as probable background objects.
  • Context. Multi-wavelength observations are indispensable in studying disk geometry and dust evolution processes in protoplanetary disks. Aims. We aimed to construct a 3-dimensional model of HD 163296 capable of reproducing simultaneously new observations of the disk surface in scattered light with the SPHERE instrument and thermal emission continuum observations of the disk midplane with ALMA. We want to determine why the SED of HD 163296 is intermediary between the otherwise well-separated group I and group II Herbig stars. Methods. The disk was modelled using the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code MCMax3D. The radial dust surface density profile was modelled after the ALMA observations, while the polarized scattered light observations were used to constrain the inclination of the inner disk component and turbulence and grain growth in the outer disk. Results. While three rings are observed in the disk midplane in millimeter thermal emission at $\sim$80, 124 and 200 AU, only the innermost of these is observed in polarized scattered light, indicating a lack of small dust grains on the surface of the outer disk. We provide two models capable of explaining this difference. The first model uses increased settling in the outer disk as a mechanism to bring the small dust grains on the surface of the disk closer to the midplane, and into the shadow cast by the first ring. The second model uses depletion of the smallest dust grains in the outer disk as a mechanism for decreasing the optical depth at optical and NIR wavelengths. In the region outside the fragmentation-dominated regime, such depletion is expected from state-of-the-art dust evolution models. We studied the effect of creating an artificial inner cavity in our models, and conclude that HD 163296 might be a precursor to typical group I sources.
  • Sub-Neptune planets are very common in our galaxy and show a large diversity in their mass-radius relation. In sub-Neptunes most of the planet mass is in the rocky part (hereafter core) which is surrounded by a modest hydrogen-helium envelope. As a result, the total initial heat content of such a planet is dominated by that of the core. Nonetheless, most studies contend that the core cooling will only have a minor effect on the radius evolution of the gaseous envelope, because the core's cooling is in sync with the envelope, i.e., most of the initial heat is released early on timescales of about 10-100 Myr. In this Letter we examine the importance of the core cooling rate for the thermal evolution of the envelope. Thus, we relax the early core cooling assumption and present a model where the core is characterized by two parameters: the initial temperature and the cooling time. We find that core cooling can significantly enhance the radius of the planet when it operates on a timescale similar to the observed age, i.e. several Gyr. Consequently, the interpretation of sub-Neptunes' mass-radius observations depends on the assumed core thermal properties and the uncertainty therein. The degeneracy of composition and core thermal properties can be reduced by obtaining better estimates of the planet ages (in addition to their radii and masses) as envisioned by future observations.
  • HD$\,$169142 is an excellent target to investigate signs of planet-disk interaction due to the previous evidence of gap structures. We performed J-band (~1.2{\mu}m) polarized intensity imaging of HD169142 with VLT/SPHERE. We observe polarized scattered light down to 0.16" (~19 au) and find an inner gap with a significantly reduced scattered light flux. We confirm the previously detected double ring structure peaking at 0.18" (~21 au) and 0.56" (~66 au), and marginally detect a faint third gap at 0.70"-0.73" (~82-85 au). We explore dust evolution models in a disk perturbed by two giant planets, as well as models with a parameterized dust size distribution. The dust evolution model is able to reproduce the ring locations and gap widths in polarized intensity, but fails to reproduce their depths. It, however, gives a good match with the ALMA dust continuum image at 1.3 mm. Models with a parameterized dust size distribution better reproduce the gap depth in scattered light, suggesting that dust filtration at the outer edges of the gaps is less effective. The pile-up of millimeter grains in a dust trap and the continuous distribution of small grains throughout the gap likely require a more efficient dust fragmentation and dust diffusion in the dust trap. Alternatively, turbulence or charging effects might lead to a reservoir of small grains at the surface layer that is not affected by the dust growth and fragmentation cycle dominating the dense disk midplane. The exploration of models shows that extracting planet properties such as mass from observed gap profiles is highly degenerate.
  • We present observations of the known edge-on debris disk around HIP 79977 (HD 146897, F star in Upper Sco, 123 pc), taken with the ZIMPOL differential polarimeter of the SPHERE instrument in the Very Broad Band filter ($\lambda_c=735$ nm, $\Delta\lambda=290$ nm) with a spatial resolution of about 25 mas. We measure the polarization flux along and perpendicular to the disk spine of the highly inclined disk for projected separations between 0.2" (25 AU) and 1.6" (200 AU) and investigate the diagnostic potential of such data with model simulations. The polarized flux contrast ratio for the disk is $F_{pol}/F_\ast= (5.5 \pm 0.9) 10^{-4}$. The surface brightness reaches a maximum of 16.2 mag arcsec$^{-2}$ at a separation of $0.2"-0.5"$ along the disk spine with a maximum surface brightness contrast of 7.64 mag arcsec$^{-2}$. The polarized flux has a minimum near the star $<0.2"$ because no or only little polarization is produced by forward or backward scattering in the disk section lying in front of or behind the star. The data are modeled as a circular dust belt with an inclination $i=85(\pm 1.5)^\circ$ and a radius between $r_0$ = 60 AU and 90 AU. The radial density dependence is described by $(r/r_0)^{\alpha}$ with a steep power law index $\alpha=5$ inside $r_0$ and a more shallow index $\alpha=-2.5$ outside $r_0$. The scattering asymmetry factor lies between $g$ = 0.2 and 0.6 adopting a scattering angle-dependence for the fractional polarization as for Rayleigh scattering. Our data are qualitatively very similar to the case of AU Mic and they confirm that edge-on debris disks have a polarization minimum at a position near the star and a maximum near the projected separation of the main debris belt. The comparison of the polarized flux contrast ratio $F_{pol}/F_{\ast}$ with the fractional infrared excess provides strong constraints on the scattering albedo of the dust.
  • Shadows in transitional disks are generally interpreted as signs of a misaligned inner disk. This disk is usually beyond the reach of current day high contrast imaging facilities. However, the location and morphology of the shadow features allow us to reconstruct the inner disk geometry. We derive analytic equations of the locations of the shadow features as a function of the orientation of the inner and outer disk and the height of the outer disk wall. In contrast to previous claims in the literature, we show that the position angle of the line connecting the shadows cannot be directly related to the position angle of the inner disk. We show how the analytic framework derived here can be applied to transitional disks with shadow features. We use estimates of the outer disk height to put constraints on the inner disk orientation. In contrast with the results from Long et al. (2017), we derive that for the disk surrounding HD100453 the analytic estimates and interferometric observations result in a consistent picture of the orientation of the inner disk. The elegant consistency in our analytic framework between observation and theory strongly support both the interpretation of the shadow features as coming from a misaligned inner disk as well as the diagnostic value of near infrared interferometry for inner disk geometry.
  • The early stages of low-mass star formation are likely to be subject to intense ionization by protostellar energetic MeV particles. As a result, the surrounding gas is enriched in molecular ions, such as HCO$^{+}$ and N$_{2}$H$^{+}$. Nonetheless, this phenomenon remains poorly understood for Class 0 objects. Recently, based on Herschel observations taken as part of the key program Chemical HErschel Surveys of Star forming regions (CHESS), a very low HCO$^{+}$/N$_{2}$H$^{+}$ abundance ratio of about 3-4, has been reported toward the protocluster OMC-2 FIR4. This finding suggests a cosmic-ray ionization rate in excess of 10$^{-14}$ s$^{-1}$, much higher than the canonical value of $\zeta$ = 3$\times$10$^{-17}$ s$^{-1}$ (value expected in quiescent dense clouds). To assess the specificity of OMC-2 FIR4, we have extended this study to a sample of sources in low- and intermediate mass. More specifically, we seek to measure the HCO$^{+}$/N$_2$H$^{+}$ abundance ratio from high energy lines (J $\ge$ 6) toward this source sample in order to infer the flux of energetic particles in the warm and dense gas surrounding the protostars. We use observations performed with the Heterodyne Instrument for the FarInfrared spectrometer on board the Herschel Space Observatory toward a sample of 9 protostars. We report HCO$^{+}$/N$_2$H$^{+}$ abundance ratios in the range of 5 up to 73 toward our source sample. The large error bars do not allow us to conclude whether OMC-2~FIR4 is a peculiar source. Nonetheless, an important result is that the measured HCO$^{+}$/N$_2$H$^{+}$ ratio does not vary with the source luminosity. At the present time, OMC-2 FIR4 remains the only source where a high flux of energetic particles is clearly evident. More sensitive and higher angular resolution observations are required to further investigate this process.
  • Exoplanet Proxima b will be an important laboratory for the search for extraterrestrial life for the decades ahead. Here we discuss the prospects of detecting carbon dioxide at 15 um using a spectral filtering technique with the Medium Resolution Spectrograph (MRS) mode of the Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). At superior conjunction, the planet is expected to show a contrast of up to 100 ppm with respect to the star. At a spectral resolving power of R=1790-2640, about 100 spectral CO2 features are visible within the 13.2-15.8 um (3B) band, which can be combined to boost the planet atmospheric signal by a factor 3-4, depending on the atmospheric temperature structure and CO2 abundance. If atmospheric conditions are favorable (assuming an Earth-like atmosphere), with this new application to the cross-correlation technique carbon dioxide can be detected within a few days of JWST observations. However, this can only be achieved if both the instrumental spectral response and the stellar spectrum can be determined to a relative precision of <= 1e-4 between adjacent spectral channels. Absolute flux calibration is not required, and the method is insensitive to the strong broadband variability of the host star. Precise calibration of the spectral features of the host star may only be attainable by obtaining deep observations of the system during inferior conjunction that serve as a reference. The high-pass filter spectroscopic technique with the MIRI MRS can be tested on warm Jupiters, Neptunes, and super-Earths with significantly higher planet/star contrast ratios than the Proxima system.
  • July 5, 2017 astro-ph.EP
    The SHINE program is a large high-contrast near-infrared survey of 600 young, nearby stars. It is aimed at searching for and characterizing new planetary systems using VLT/SPHERE's unprecedented high-contrast and high-angular resolution imaging capabilities. It also intends at placing statistical constraints on the occurrence and orbital properties of the giant planet population at large orbits as a function of the stellar host mass and age to test planet formation theories. We use the IRDIS dual-band imager and the IFS integral field spectrograph of SPHERE to acquire high-constrast coronagraphic differential near-infrared images and spectra of the young A2 star HIP65426. It is a member of the ~17 Myr old Lower Centaurus-Crux association. At a separation of 830 mas (92 au projected) from the star, we detect a faint red companion. Multi-epoch observations confirm that it shares common proper motion with HIP65426. Spectro-photometric measurements extracted with IFS and IRDIS between 0.95 and 2.2um indicate a warm, dusty atmosphere characteristic of young low surface-gravity L5-L7 dwarfs. Hot-start evolutionary models predict a luminosity consistent with a 6-12 MJup, Teff=1300-1600 K and R=1.5 RJup giant planet. Finally, the comparison with Exo-REM and PHOENIX BT-Settl synthetic atmosphere models gives consistent effective temperatures but with slightly higher surface gravity solutions of log(g)=4.0-5.0 with smaller radii (1.0-1.3 RJup). Given its physical and spectral properties, HIP65426b occupies a rather unique placement in terms of age, mass and spectral-type among the currently known imaged planets. It represents a particularly interesting case to study the presence of clouds as a function of particle size, composition, and location in the atmosphere, to search for signatures of non-equilibrium chemistry, and finally to test the theory of planet formation and evolution.
  • We have observed the protoplanetary disk of the well-known young Herbig star HD 142527 using ZIMPOL Polarimetric Differential Imaging with the VBB (Very Broad Band, ~600-900nm) filter. We obtained two datasets in May 2015 and March 2016. Our data allow us to explore dust scattering around the star down to a radius of ~0.025" (~4au). The well-known outer disk is clearly detected, at higher resolution than before, and shows previously unknown sub-structures, including spirals going inwards into the cavity. Close to the star, dust scattering is detected at high signal-to-noise ratio, but it is unclear whether the signal represents the inner disk, which has been linked to the two prominent local minima in the scattering of the outer disk, interpreted as shadows. An interpretation of an inclined inner disk combined with a dust halo is compatible with both our and previous observations, but other arrangements of the dust cannot be ruled out. Dust scattering is also present within the large gap between ~30 and ~140au. The comparison of the two datasets suggests rapid evolution of the inner regions of the disk, potentially driven by the interaction with the close-in M-dwarf companion, around which no polarimetric signal is detected.
  • The transition disk around the T Tauri star T Cha possesses a large gap, making it a prime target for high-resolution imaging in the context of planet formation. We aim to find signs of disk evolutionary processes by studying the disk geometry and the dust grain properties at its surface, and to search for companion candidates. We analyze a set of VLT/SPHERE data at near-infrared and optical wavelengths. We performed polarimetric imaging of T Cha with IRDIS (1.6 $\mu$m) and ZIMPOL (0.5-0.9 $\mu$m), and obtained intensity images from IRDIS dual-band imaging with simultaneous spectro-imaging with IFS (0.9-1.3 $\mu$m). The disk around T Cha is detected in all observing modes and its outer disk is resolved in scattered light with unprecedented angular resolution and signal-to-noise. The images reveal a highly inclined disk with a noticeable east-west brightness asymmetry. The significant amount of non-azimuthal polarization signal in the $U_{\phi}$ images, with a $U_{\phi}$/$Q_{\phi}$ peak-to-peak value of 14%, is in accordance with theoretical studies on multiple scattering. Our optimal axisymmetric radiative transfer model considers two coplanar inner and outer disks, separated by a gap of 0.28" (~30au) in size. We derive a disk inclination of ~69 deg and PA of ~114 deg. In order to self-consistently reproduce the intensity and polarimetric images, the dust grains, responsible for the scattered light, need to be dominated by sizes of around ten microns. A point source is detected at an angular distance of 3.5" from the central star. It is, however, found not to be co-moving. We confirm that the dominant source of emission is forward scattered light from the near edge of the outer disk. Our point source analysis rules out the presence of a companion heavier than ~8.5 $M_{\mathrm{jup}}$ between 0.1" and 0.3". The detection limit decreases to ~2 $M_{\mathrm{jup}}$ for 0.3" to 4.0".
  • Cometary dust provides a unique window on dust growth mechanisms during the onset of planet formation. Measurements by the Rosetta spacecraft show that the dust in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko has a granular structure at size scales from sub-um up to several hundreds of um, indicating hierarchical growth took place across these size scales. However, these dust particles may have been modified during their collection by the spacecraft instruments. Here we present the results of laboratory experiments that simulate the impact of dust on the collection surfaces of COSIMA and MIDAS, instruments onboard the Rosetta spacecraft. We map the size and structure of the footprints left by the dust particles as a function of their initial size (up to several hundred um) and velocity (up to 6 m/s). We find that in most collisions, only part of the dust particle is left on the target; velocity is the main driver of the appearance of these deposits. A boundary between sticking/bouncing and fragmentation as an outcome of the particle-target collision is found at v ~ 2 m/s. For velocities below this value, particles either stick and leave a single deposit on the target plate, or bounce, leaving a shallow footprint of monomers. At velocities > 2 m/s and sizes > 80 um, particles fragment upon collision, transferring up to 50 per cent of their mass in a rubble-pile-like deposit on the target plate. The amount of mass transferred increases with the impact velocity. The morphologies of the deposits are qualitatively similar to those found by the COSIMA instrument.
  • Context. The SAO 206462 (HD 135344B) disk is one of the few known transitional disks showing asymmetric features in scattered light and thermal emission. Near-infrared scattered-light images revealed two bright outer spiral arms and an inner cavity depleted in dust. Giant protoplanets have been proposed to account for the disk morphology. Aims. We aim to search for giant planets responsible for the disk features and, in the case of non-detection, to constrain recent planet predictions using the data detection limits. Methods. We obtained new high-contrast and high-resolution total intensity images of the target spanning the Y to the K bands (0.95-2.3 mic) using the VLT/SPHERE near-infrared camera and integral field spectrometer. Results. The spiral arms and the outer cavity edge are revealed at high resolutions and sensitivities without the need for image post-processing techniques, which introduce photometric biases. We do not detect any close-in companions. For the derivation of the detection limits on putative giant planets embedded in the disk, we show that the knowledge of the disk aspect ratio and viscosity is critical for the estimation of the attenuation of a planet signal by the protoplanetary dust because of the gaps that these putative planets may open. Given assumptions on these parameters, the mass limits can vary from ~2-5 to ~4-7 Jupiter masses at separations beyond the disk spiral arms. The SPHERE detection limits are more stringent than those derived from archival NaCo/L' data and provide new constraints on a few recent predictions of massive planets (4-15 MJ) based on the spiral density wave theory. The SPHERE and ALMA data do not favor the hypotheses on massive giant planets in the outer disk (beyond 0.6). There could still be low-mass planets in the outer disk and/or planets inside the cavity.
  • R Aqr is a symbiotic binary system consisting of a mira variable, a hot companion with a spectacular jet outflow, and an extended emission line nebula. We have used R Aqr as test target for the visual camera subsystem ZIMPOL, which is part of the new extreme adaptive optics (AO) instrument SPHERE at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). We compare our observations with data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and illustrate the complementarity of the two instruments. We determine from the Halpha emission the position, size, geometric structure, and line fluxes of the jet source and the clouds in the innermost region (<2") of R Aqr and determine Halpha emissivities mean density, mass, recombination time scale, and other cloud parameters. Our data resolve for the first time the R Aqr binary and we measure for the jet source a relative position 46+/-1 mas West of the mira. The central jet source is the strongest Halpha component. North east and south west from the central source there are many clouds with very diverse structures. We see in the SW a string of bright clouds arranged in a zig-zag pattern and, further out, more extended bubbles. In the N and NE we see a bright, very elongated filamentary structure and faint perpendicular "wisps" further out. Some jet clouds are also detected in the ZIMPOL [OI] and He I filters, as well as in the HST line filters for Halpha, [OIII], [NII], and [OI]. We determine jet cloud parameters and find a very well defined anti-correlation between cloud density and distance to the central binary. Future Halpha observations will provide the orientation of the orbital plane of the binary and allow detailed hydrodynamical investigations of this jet outflow and its interaction with the wind of the red giant companion.
  • To understand the chemical composition of planets, it is important to know the chemical composition of the region where they form in protoplanetary disks. Due to its fundamental role in chemical and biological processes, carbon is a key element to trace. We aim to identify the carriers and processes behind the extended NIR flux observed around several Herbig stars. We compare the extended NIR flux from objects in the PIONIER Herbig Ae/Be survey with their flux in the PAH features. HD 100453 is used as a benchmark case to investigate the influence of quantum heated particles, like PAHs or very small carbonaceous grains, in more detail. We use the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code MCMax to do a parameter study of the QHP size and scale- height and examine the influence of quantum heating on the amount of extended flux in the NIR visibilities. There is a correlation between the PAH feature flux of a disk and the amount of its extended NIR flux. We find that very small carbonaceous grains create the observed extended NIR flux around HD 100453 and still lead to a realistic SED. These results can not be achieved without using quantum heating effects, e.g. only with scattered light and grains in thermal equilibrium. It is possible to explain the extended NIR emission around Herbig stars with the presence of carbonaceous, quantum heated particles. Interferometric observations can be used to constrain the spatial distribution and typical size of carbonaceous material in the terrestrial planet forming region.
  • The protoplanetary disk around the F-type star HD 135344B (SAO 206462) is in a transition stage and shows many intriguing structures both in scattered light and thermal (sub-)millimeter emission which are possibly related to planet formation processes. We study the morphology and surface brightness of the disk in scattered light to gain insight into the innermost disk regions, the formation of protoplanets, planet-disk interactions traced in the surface and midplane layers, and the dust grain properties of the disk surface. We have carried out high-contrast polarimetric differential imaging (PDI) observations with VLT/SPHERE and obtained polarized scattered light images with ZIMPOL in R- and I-band and with IRDIS in Y- and J-band. The scattered light images reveal with unprecedented angular resolution and sensitivity the spiral arms as well as the 25 au cavity of the disk. Multiple shadow features are discovered on the outer disk with one shadow only being present during the second observation epoch. A positive surface brightness gradient is observed in the stellar irradiation corrected images in southwest direction possibly due to an azimuthally asymmetric perturbation of the temperature and/or surface density by the passing spiral arms. The disk integrated polarized flux, normalized to the stellar flux, shows a positive trend towards longer wavelengths which we attribute to large aggregate dust grains in the disk surface. Part of the the non-azimuthal polarization signal in the Uphi image of the J-band observation could be the result of multiple scattering in the disk. The detected shadow features and their possible variability have the potential to provide insight into the structure of and processes occurring in the innermost disk regions.
  • Understanding the diversity of planets requires to study the morphology and the physical conditions in the protoplanetary disks in which they form. We observed and spatially resolved the disk around the ~10 Myr old protoplanetary disk HD 100453 in polarized scattered light with SPHERE/VLT at optical and near-infrared wavelengths, reaching an angular resolution of ~0.02", and an inner working angle of ~0.09". We detect polarized scattered light up to ~0.42" (~48 au) and detect a cavity, a rim with azimuthal brightness variations at an inclination of 38 degrees, two shadows and two symmetric spiral arms. The spiral arms originate near the location of the shadows, close to the semi major axis. We detect a faint spiral-like feature in the SW that can be interpreted as the scattering surface of the bottom side of the disk, if the disk is tidally truncated by the M-dwarf companion currently seen at a projected distance of ~119 au. We construct a radiative transfer model that accounts for the main characteristics of the features with an inner and outer disk misaligned by ~72 degrees. The azimuthal brightness variations along the rim are well reproduced with the scattering phase function of the model. While spirals can be triggered by the tidal interaction with the companion, the close proximity of the spirals to the shadows suggests that the shadows could also play a role. The change in stellar illumination along the rim, induces an azimuthal variation of the scale height that can contribute to the brightness variations. Dark regions in polarized images of transition disks are now detected in a handful of disks and often interpreted as shadows due to a misaligned inner disk. The origin of such a misalignment in HD 100453, and of the spirals, is unclear, and might be due to a yet-undetected massive companion inside the cavity, and on an inclined orbit.
  • We search for signs of ongoing planet-disk interaction and study the distribution of small grains at the surface of the transition disk around RXJ1615.3-3255 (RX J1615). We observed RXJ1615 with VLT/SPHERE. We image the disk for the first time in scattered light and detect two arcs, two rings, a gap and an inner disk with marginal evidence for an inner cavity. The shapes of the arcs suggest that they probably are segments of full rings. Ellipse fitting for the two rings and inner disk yield a disk inclination i = 47 \pm 2 degrees and find semi-major axes of 1.50 \pm 0.01" (278 au), 1.06 \pm 0.01" (196 au) and 0.30 \pm 0.01" (56 au), respectively. We determine the scattering surface height above the midplane, based on the projected ring center offsets. Nine point sources are detected between 2.1" and 8.0" separation and considered as companion candidates. With NACO data we recover four of the nine point sources, which we determine not to be co-moving, and therefore unbound to the system. We present the first detection of the transition disk of RXJ1615 in scattered light. The height of the rings indicate limited flaring of the disk surface, which enables partial self-shadowing in the disk. The outermost arc either traces the bottom of the disk or it is another ring with semi-major axis > 2.35" (435 au). We explore both scenarios, extrapolating the complete shape of the feature, which will allow to distinguish between the two in future observations. The most interesting scenario, where the arc traces the bottom of the outer ring, requires the disk truncated at r ~ 360 au. The closest companion candidate, if indeed orbiting the disk at 540 au, would then be the most likely cause for such truncation. This companion candidate, as well as the remaining four, require follow up observations to determine if they are bound to the system.
  • High-contrast scattered light observations have revealed the surface morphology of several dozens of protoplanetary disks at optical and near-infrared wavelengths. Inclined disks offer the opportunity to measure part of the phase function of the dust grains that reside in the disk surface which is essential for our understanding of protoplanetary dust properties and the early stages of planet formation. We aim to construct a method which takes into account how the flaring shape of the scattering surface of an (optically thick) protoplanetary disk projects onto the image plane of the observer. This allows us to map physical quantities (scattering radius and scattering angle) onto scattered light images and retrieve stellar irradiation corrected (r^2-scaled) images and dust phase functions. We apply the method on archival polarized intensity images of the protoplanetary disk around HD 100546 that were obtained with VLT/SPHERE in R'-band and VLT/NACO in H- and Ks-band. The brightest side of the r^2-scaled R'-band polarized intensity image of HD 100546 changes from the far to the near side of the disk when a flaring instead of a geometrically flat disk surface is used for the r^2-scaling. The decrease in polarized surface brightness in the scattering angle range of ~40-70 deg is likely a result of the dust phase function and degree of polarization which peak in different scattering angle regimes. The derived phase functions show part of a forward scattering peak which indicates that large, aggregate dust grains dominate the scattering opacity in the disk surface. Projection effects of a protoplanetary disk surface need to be taken into account to correctly interpret scattered light images. Applying the correct scaling for the correction of stellar irradiation is crucial for the interpretation of the images and the derivation of the dust properties in the disk surface layer.
  • We present an overview of the scientific potential of MATISSE, the Multi Aperture mid-Infrared SpectroScopic Experiment for the Very Large Telescope Interferometer. For this purpose we outline selected case studies from various areas, such as star and planet formation, active galactic nuclei, evolved stars, extrasolar planets, and solar system minor bodies and discuss strategies for the planning and analysis of future MATISSE observations. Moreover, the importance of MATISSE observations in the context of complementary high-angular resolution observations at near-infrared and submillimeter/millimeter wavelengths is highlighted.
  • We studied the well known circumstellar disk around the Herbig Ae/Be star HD 97048 with high angular resolution to reveal undetected structures in the disk, which may be indicative of disk evolutionary processes such as planet formation. We used the IRDIS near-IR subsystem of the extreme adaptive optics imager SPHERE at the ESO/VLT to study the scattered light from the circumstellar disk via high resolution polarimetry and angular differential imaging. We imaged the disk in unprecedented detail and revealed four ring-like brightness enhancements and corresponding gaps in the scattered light from the disk surface with radii between 39 au and 341 au. We derived the inclination and position angle as well as the height of the scattering surface of the disk from our observational data. We found that the surface height profile can be described by a single power law up to a separation ~270 au. Using the surface height profile we measured the scattering phase function of the disk and found that it is well consistent with theoretical models of compact dust aggregates. We discuss the origin of the detected features and find that low mass (< 1 M_Jup) nascent planets are a possible explanation.
  • LkCa 15 hosts a pre-transitional disk as well as at least one accreting protoplanet orbiting in its gap. Previous disk observations have focused mainly on the outer disk, which is cleared inward of ~50 au. The planet candidates, on the other hand, reside at orbital radii around 15 au, where disk observations have been unreliable until recently. Here we present new J-band imaging polarimetry of LkCa 15 with SPHERE IRDIS, yielding the most accurate and detailed scattered-light images of the disk to date down to the planet-hosting inner regions. We find what appear to be persistent asymmetric structures in the scattering material at the location of the planet candidates, which could be responsible at least for parts of the signals measured with sparse-aperture masking. These images further allow us to trace the gap edge in scattered light at all position angles and search the inner and outer disks for morphological substructure. The outer disk appears smooth with slight azimuthal variations in polarized surface brightness, which may be due to shadowing from the inner disk or a two-peaked polarized phase function. We find that the near-side gap edge revealed by polarimetry matches the sharp crescent seen in previous ADI imaging very well. Finally, the ratio of polarized disk to stellar flux is more than six times larger in J-band than in the RI bands.
  • Evaporating rocky exoplanets, such as KIC 12557548b, eject large amounts of dust grains, which can trail the planet in a comet-like tail. When such objects occult their host star, the resulting transit signal contains information about the dust in the tail. We aim to use the detailed shape of the Kepler light curve of KIC 12557548b to constrain the size and composition of the dust grains that make up the tail, as well as the mass loss rate of the planet. Using a self-consistent numerical model of the dust dynamics and sublimation, we calculate the shape of the tail by following dust grains from their ejection from the planet to their destruction due to sublimation. From this dust cloud shape, we generate synthetic light curves (incorporating the effects of extinction and angle-dependent scattering), which are then compared with the phase-folded Kepler light curve. We explore the free-parameter space thoroughly using a Markov chain Monte Carlo method. Our physics-based model is capable of reproducing the observed light curve in detail. Good fits are found for initial grain sizes between 0.2 and 5.6 micron and dust mass loss rates of 0.6 to 15.6 M_earth/Gyr (2-sigma ranges). We find that only certain combinations of material parameters yield the correct tail length. These constraints are consistent with dust made of corundum (Al2O3), but do not agree with a range of carbonaceous, silicate, or iron compositions. Using a detailed, physically motivated model, it is possible to constrain the composition of the dust in the tails of evaporating rocky exoplanets. This provides a unique opportunity to probe to interior composition of the smallest known exoplanets.