• By performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations, we address the topological phase of CaAgP and investigate the topological phase transition in CaAg(P1-xAsx). We reveal that in CaAgP, the bulk band gap and surface states with a large bandwidth are topologically trivial, in agreement with hybrid density functional theory calculations. The calculations also indicate that application of "negative" hydrostatic pressure can transform trivial semiconducting CaAgP into an ideal topological nodal-line semimetal phase. The topological transition can be realized by partial isovalent P/As substitution at x = 0.38.
  • We present a soft x-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of the overdoped high-temperature superconductors La$_{2-x}$Sr$_x$CuO$_4$ and La$_{1.8-x}$Eu$_{0.2}$Sr$_x$CuO$_4$. In-plane and out-of-plane components of the Fermi surface are mapped by varying the photoemission angle and the incident photon energy. No $k_z$ dispersion is observed along the nodal direction, whereas a significant antinodal $k_z$ dispersion is identified. Based on a tight-binding parametrization, we discuss the implications for the density of states near the van-Hove singularity. Our results suggest that the large electronic specific heat found in overdoped La$_{2-x}$Sr$_x$CuO$_4$ can not be assigned to the van-Hove singularity alone. We therefore propose quantum criticality induced by a collapsing pseudogap phase as the most plausible explanation for observed enhancement of electronic specific heat.
  • Relativistic massless Dirac fermions can be probed with high-energy physics experiments, but appear also as low-energy quasi-particle excitations in electronic band structures. In condensed matter systems, their massless nature can be protected by crystal symmetries. Classification of such symmetry protected relativistic band degeneracies has been fruitful, although many of the predicted quasi-particles still await their experimental discovery. Here we reveal, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, the existence of two-dimensional type-II Dirac fermions in the high-temperature superconductor La$_{1.77}$Sr$_{0.23}$CuO$_4$. The Dirac point, constituting the crossing of $d_{x^2-y^2}$ and $d_{z^2}$ bands, is found approximately one electronvolt below the Fermi level ($E_\mathrm{F}$) and is protected by mirror symmetry. If spin-orbit coupling is considered, the Dirac point is gapped and the bands become topologically non-trivial. Our band structure calculations suggest that in certain nickelate systems, the same type of Dirac cone is found in close vicinity to $E_\mathrm{F}$. We thus demonstrate that oxides are a promising material class for realizing type-II Dirac fermions near $E_\mathrm{F}$.
  • Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy it is revealed that in the vicinity of optimal doping the electronic structure of La2-xSrxCuO4 cuprate undergoes an electronic reconstruction associated with a wave vector q_a=(pi, 0). The reconstructed Fermi surface and folded band are distinct to the shadow bands observed in BSCCO cuprates and in underdoped La2-xSrxCuO4 with x <= 0.12, which shift the primary band along the zone diagonal direction. Furthermore the folded bands appear only with q_a=(pi, 0) vector, but not with q_b= (0, pi). We demonstrate that the absence of q_b reconstruction is not due to the matrix-element effects in the photoemission process, which indicates the four-fold symmetry is broken in the system.
  • The Weyl semimetal phase is a recently discovered topological quantum state of matter characterized by the presence of topologically protected degeneracies near the Fermi level. These degeneracies are the source of exotic phenomena, including the realization of chiral Weyl fermions as quasiparticles in the bulk and the formation of Fermi arc states on the surfaces. Here, we demonstrate that these two key signatures show distinct evolutions with the bulk band topology by performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, supported by first-principle calculations, on transition-metal monophosphides. While Weyl fermion quasiparticles exist only when the chemical potential is located between two saddle points of the Weyl cone features, the Fermi arc states extend in a larger energy scale and are robust across the bulk Lifshitz transitions associated with the recombination of two non-trivial Fermi surfaces enclosing one Weyl point into a single trivial Fermi surface enclosing two Weyl points of opposite chirality. Therefore, in some systems (e.g. NbP), topological Fermi arc states are preserved even if Weyl fermion quasiparticles are absent in the bulk. Our findings not only provide insight into the relationship between the exotic physical phenomena and the intrinsic bulk band topology in Weyl semimetals, but also resolve the apparent puzzle of the different magneto-transport properties observed in TaAs, TaP and NbP, where the Fermi arc states are similar.
  • We investigate the band structure of BaBiO$_{3}$, an insulating parent compound of doped high-$T_{c}$ superconductors, using \emph{in situ} angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on thin films. The data compare favorably overall with density functional theory calculations within the local density approximation, demonstrating that electron correlations are weak. The bands exhibit Brillouin zone folding consistent with known BiO$_{6}$ breathing distortions. Though the distortions are often thought to coincide with Bi$^{3+}$/Bi$^{5+}$ charge ordering, core level spectra show that bismuth is monovalent. We further demonstrate that the bands closest to the Fermi level are primarily oxygen derived, while the bismuth $6s$ states mostly contribute to dispersive bands at deeper binding energy. The results support a model of Bi-O charge transfer in which hole pairs are localized on combinations of the O $2p$ orbitals.
  • In the studies of iron-pnictides, a key question is whether their bad-metal state from which the superconductivity emerges lies in close proximity with a magnetically ordered insulating phase. Recently it was found that at low temperatures, the heavily Cu-doped NaFe$_{1-x}$Cu$_x$As ($x > 0.3$) iron-pnictide is an insulator with long-range antiferromagnetic order, similar to the parent compound of cuprates but distinct from all other iron-pnictides. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we determined the momentum-resolved electronic structure of NaFe$_{1-x}$Cu$_x$As ($x = 0.44$) and identified that its ground state is a narrow-gap insulator. Combining the experimental results with density functional theory (DFT) and DFT+U calculations, our analysis reveals that the on-site Coulombic (Hubbard) and Hund's coupling energies play crucial roles in formation of the band gap about the chemical potential. We propose that at finite temperatures charge carriers are thermally excited from the Cu-As-like valence band into the conduction band, which is of Fe $3d$-like character. With increasing temperature, the number of electrons in the conduction band becomes larger and the hopping energy between Fe sites increases, and finally the long-range antiferromagnetic order is destroyed at $T > T_\mathrm{N}$. Our study provides a basis for investigating the evolution of the electronic structure of a Mott insulator transforming into a bad metallic phase, and eventually forming a superconducting state in iron-pnictidesa superconducting state in iron-pnictides.
  • A new type of Weyl semimetal state, in which the energy values of Weyl nodes are not the local extrema, has been theoretically proposed recently, namely type II Weyl semimetal. Distinguished from type I semimetal (e.g. TaAs), the Fermi surfaces in a type II Weyl semimetal consist of a pair of electron and hole pockets touching at the Weyl node. In addition, Weyl fermions in type II Weyl semimetals violate Lorentz invariance. Due to these qualitative differences distinct spectroscopy and magnetotransport properties are expected in type II Weyl semimetals. Here, we present the direct observation of the Fermi arc states in MoTe2 by using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Two arc states are identified for each pair of Weyl nodes whoes surface projections of them possess single topological charge, which is a unique property for type II Weyl semimetals. The experimentally determined Fermi arcs are consistent with our first principle calculations. Our results unambiguously establish that MoTe2 is a type II Weyl semimetal, which serves as a great test bed to investigate the phenomena of new type of Weyl fermions with Lorentz invariance violated.
  • We present a combined angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and first-principles calculations study of the electronic structure of LaAgSb$_2$ in the entire first Brillouin zone. We observe a Dirac-cone-like structure in the vicinity of the Fermi level formed by the crossing of two linear energy bands, as well as the nested segments of Fermi surface pocket emerging from the cone. Our ARPES results show the close relationship of the Dirac cone to the charge-density-wave ordering, providing consistent explanations for exotic behaviors in this material.
  • We present a resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) study of spin and charge excitations in overdoped La1.77Sr0.23CuO4 along two high-symmetry directions. The line shape of these excitations is analyzed and they are shown to be highly overdamped. Their spectral weight and damping are found to be strongly momentum dependent. Qualitative agreement between these observations and a calculated RPA susceptibility is obtained for this overdoped compound, implying that a significant contribution to the RIXS signal stems from a continuum of charge excitations. Furthermore, this suggests that the spin-excitations in the overdoped regime can be captured qualitatively by an itinerant picture. Our calculations also predict a new low-energy spin excitation branch to exist along the nodal direction near the zone center. With the energy resolution of the present experiment, this branch is not resolvable but we show that next generation of high-resolution spectrometers will be able to test this prediction.
  • In the family of the iron-based superconductors, the $RE$FeAsO-type compounds (with $RE$ being a rare-earth metal) exhibit the highest bulk superconducting transition temperatures ($T_{\mathrm{c}}$) up to $55\ \textrm{K}$ and thus hold the key to the elusive pairing mechanism. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the intrinsic electronic structure of SmFe$_{0.92}$Co$_{0.08}$AsO ($T_{\mathrm{c}}=18\ \textrm{K}$) is highly nontrivial and consists of multiple band-edge singularities in close proximity to the Fermi level. However, it remains unclear whether these singularities are generic to the $RE$FeAsO-type materials and if so, whether their exact topology is responsible for the aforementioned record $T_{\mathrm{c}}$. In this work, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to investigate the inherent electronic structure of the NdFeAsO$_{0.6}$F$_{0.4}$ compound with a twice higher $T_{\mathrm{c}}=38\ \textrm{K}$. We find a similarly singular Fermi surface and further demonstrate that the dramatic enhancement of superconductivity in this compound correlates closely with the fine-tuning of one of the band-edge singularities to within a fraction of the superconducting energy gap $\Delta$ below the Fermi level. Our results provide compelling evidence that the band-structure singularities near the Fermi level in the iron-based superconductors must be explicitly accounted for in any attempt to understand the mechanism of superconducting pairing in these materials.
  • We have investigated the spin texture of surface Fermi arcs in the recently discovered Weyl semimetal TaAs using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The experimental results demonstrate that the Fermi arcs are spin-polarized. The measured spin texture fulfills the requirement of mirror and time reversal symmetries and is well reproduced by our first-principles calculations, which gives strong evidence for the topologically nontrivial Weyl semimetal state in TaAs. The consistency between the experimental and calculated results further confirms the distribution of chirality of the Weyl nodes determined by first-principles calculations.
  • We employed {\it in-situ} pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to investigate the mechanism of the metal-insulator transition (MIT) in NdNiO$_3$ (NNO) thin films, grown on NdGaO$_3$(110) and LaAlO$_3$(100) substrates. In the metallic phase, we observe three dimensional hole and electron Fermi surface (FS) pockets formed from strongly renormalized bands with well-defined quasiparticles. Upon cooling across the MIT in NNO/NGO sample, the quasiparticles lose coherence via a spectral weight transfer from near the Fermi level to localized states forming at higher binding energies. In the case of NNO/LAO, the bands are apparently shifted upward with an additional holelike pocket forming at the corner of the Brillouin zone. We find that the renormalization effects are strongly anisotropic and are stronger in NNO/NGO than NNO/LAO. Our study reveals that substrate-induced strain tunes the crystal field splitting, which changes the FS properties, nesting conditions, and spin-fluctuation strength, and thereby controls the MIT via the formation of an electronic order parameter with Q$_{AF}\sim$(1/4, 1/4, 1/4$\pm$$\delta$).
  • The effects of electron-electron correlations on the low-energy electronic structure and their relationship with unconventional superconductivity are central aspects in the research on the iron-based pnictide superconductors. Here we use soft X-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (SX-ARPES) to study how electronic correlations evolve in different chemically substituted iron pnictides. We find that correlations are intrinsically related to the effective filling of the correlated orbitals, rather than to the filling obtained by valence counting. Combined density functional theory (DFT) and dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) calculations capture these effects, reproducing the experimentally observed trend in the correlation strength. The occupation-driven trend in the electronic correlation reported in our work supports the recently proposed connection between cuprate and pnictides phase diagrams.
  • Using high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations, we characterize superconducting TlNi$_2$Se$_2$ as a material with weak electronic Coulomb correlations leading to a bandwidth renormalization of 1.4. We identify a camelback-shaped band, whose energetic position strongly depends on the selenium height. While this feature is universal in transition metal pnictides, in TlNi$_2$Se$_2$ it lies in the immediate vicinity of the Fermi level, giving rise to a pronounced van Hove singularity. The resulting heavy band mass resolves the apparent puzzle of a large normal-state specific heat coefficient (Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 207001) in this weakly correlated compound.
  • Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we show that the recently-discovered surface state on SrTiO$_{3}$ consists of non-degenerate $t_{2g}$ states with different dimensional characters. While the $d_{xy}$ bands have quasi-2D dispersions with weak $k_{z}$ dependence, the lifted $d_{xz}$/$d_{yz}$ bands show 3D dispersions that differ significantly from bulk expectations and signal that electrons associated with those orbitals permeate the near-surface region. Like their more 2D counterparts, the size and character of the $d_{xz}$/$d_{yz}$ Fermi surface components are essentially the same for different sample preparations. Irradiating SrTiO$_{3}$ in ultrahigh vacuum is one method observed so far to induce the "universal" surface metallic state. We reveal that during this process, changes in the oxygen valence band spectral weight that coincide with the emergence of surface conductivity are disproportionate to any change in the total intensity of the O $1s$ core level spectrum. This signifies that the formation of the metallic surface goes beyond a straightforward chemical doping scenario and occurs in conjunction with profound changes in the initial states and/or spatial distribution of near-$E_{F}$ electrons in the surface region.
  • Temperature dependence of the electronic structure of SmB6 is studied by high-resolution ARPES down to 1 K. We demonstrate that there is no essential difference for the dispersions of the surface states below and above the resistivity saturating anomaly (~ 3.5 K). Quantitative analyses of the surface states indicate that the quasi-particle scattering rate increases linearly as a function of temperature and binding energy, which differs from Fermi-Liquid behavior. Most intriguingly, we observe that the hybridization between the d and f states builds gradually over a wide temperature region (30 K < T < 110 K). The surface states appear when the hybridization starts to develop. Our detailed temperature-dependence results give a complete interpretation of the exotic resistivity result of SmB6, as well as the discrepancies among experimental results concerning the temperature regions in which the topological surface states emerge and the Kondo gap opens, and give new insights into the exotic Kondo crossover and its relationship with the topological surface states in the topological Kondo insulator SmB6.
  • The concept of a topological Kondo insulator (TKI) has been brought forward as a new class of topological insulators in which non-trivial surface states reside in the bulk Kondo band gap at low temperature due to the strong spin-orbit coupling [1-3]. In contrast to other three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators (e.g. Bi2Se3), a TKI is truly insulating in the bulk [4]. Furthermore, strong electron correlations are present in the system, which may interact with the novel topological phase. Applying spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (SARPES) to the Kondo insulator SmB6, a promising TKI candidate, we reveal that the surface states of SmB6 are spin polarized, and the spin is locked to the crystal momentum. Counter-propagating states (i.e. at k and -k) have opposite spin polarizations protected by time-reversal symmetry. Together with the odd number of Fermi surfaces of surface states between the 4 time-reversal invariant momenta in the surface Brillouin zone [5], these findings prove, for the first time, that SmB6 can host non-trivial topological surface states in a full insulating gap in the bulk stemming from the Kondo effect. Hence our experimental results establish that SmB6 is the first realization of a 3D TKI. It can also serve as an ideal platform for the systematic study of the interplay between novel topological quantum states with emergent effects and competing order induced by strongly correlated electrons.
  • Systematic angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments have been carried out to investigate the bulk and (100) surface electronic structures of a topological mixed-valence insulator candidate, YbB6. The bulk states of YbB6 were probed with bulk-sensitive soft X-ray ARPES, which show strong three-dimensionality as required by cubic symmetry. Surprisingly the measured Yb 4f states are located around 1 eV and 2.3 eV below the Fermi level (EF), instead of being near EF as indicated by first principle calculations. The dispersive bands near EF are B 2p states, which hybridize with the 4f states. Using surface-sensitive vacuum-ultraviolet ARPES, we revealed two-dimensional surface states which form three electron-like Fermi surfaces (FSs) with Dirac-cone-like dispersions. The odd number of surface FSs gives the first indication that YbB6 is a moderately correlated topological insulator. The spin-resolved ARPES measurements provide further evidence that these surface states are spin polarized with spin locked to the crystal momentum. We have observed a second set of surface states with different topology (hole-like pockets). Clear folding of the bands suggest their origin from a 1X2 reconstructed surface. The topological property of the reconstructed surface states needs further studies.
  • Recent theoretical calculations and experimental results suggest that the strongly correlated material SmB$_{6}$ may be a realization of a topological Kondo insulator. We have performed an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study on SmB$_{6}$ in order to elucidate elements of the electronic structure relevant to the possible occurrence of a topological Kondo insulator state. The obtained electronic structure in the whole three-dimensional momentum space reveals one electron-like 5d bulk band centred at the X point of the bulk Brillouin zone that is hybridized with strongly correlated f electrons, as well as the opening of a Kondo bandgap ($\Delta_B$ $\sim$ 20 meV) at low temperature. In addition, we observe electron-like bands forming three Fermi surfaces at the center $\bar{\Gamma}$ point and boundary $\bar{X}$ point of the surface Brillouin zone. These bands are not expected from calculations of the bulk electronic structure, and their observed dispersion characteristics are consistent with surface states. Our results suggest that the unusual low-temperature transport behavior of SmB$_{6}$ is likely to be related to the pronounced surface states sitting inside the band hybridisation gap and/or the presence of a topological Kondo insulating state.