• Transitional discs are a class of circumstellar discs around young stars with extensive clearing of dusty material within their inner regions on 10s of au scales. One of the primary candidates for this kind of clearing is the formation of planet(s) within the disc that then accrete or clear their immediate area as they migrate through the disc. Our sample included eight transitional discs. Using the Keck/NIRC2 instrument we utilised the Sparse Aperture Masking (SAM) interferometry technique to search for asymmetries indicative of ongoing planet formation. We searched for close-in companions using both model fitting and interferometric image reconstruction techniques. Using simulated data, we derived diagnostics that helped us to distinguish between point sources and extended asymmetric disc emission. In addition, we investigated the degeneracy between the contrast and separation that appear for marginally resolved companions. We found FP Tau to contain a previously unseen disc wall, and DM Tau, LkHa 330, and TW Hya to contain an asymmetric signal indicative of point source-like emission. We placed upper limits on the contrast of a companion in RXJ1842.9-3532 and V2246 Oph. We ruled the asymmetry signal in RXJ1615.3-3255 and V2062 Oph to be false positives. In the cases where our data indicated a potential companion we computed estimates for the value of $M_c \dot M_c$ and found values in the range of $10^{-5} - 10^{-3} M^2_J yr^{-1}$. We found significant asymmetries in four targets. Of these, three were consistent with companions. We resolved a previously unseen gap in the disc of FP Tau extending inwards from approximately 10 au.
  • Transitional disks are protoplanetary disks with opacity gaps/cavities in their dust distribution, a feature that may be linked to planet formation. We perform Bayesian modeling of the three transitional disks SZ Cha, CS Cha and T25 including photometry from the Herschel Space Observatory to quantify the improvements added by these new data. We find disk dust masses between 2x10^-5 and 4x10^-4 Msun, and gap radii in the range of 7-18 AU, with uncertainties of ~ one order of magnitude and ~ 4 AU, respectively. Our results show that adding Herschel data can significantly improve these estimates with respect to mid-infrared data alone, which have roughly twice as large uncertainties on both disk mass and gap radius. We also find weak evidence for different density profiles with respect to full disks. These results open exciting new possibilities to study the distribution of disk masses for large samples of disks.
  • We present a time-variability study of young stellar objects in the cluster IRAS 20050+2720, performed at 3.6 and 4.5 micron with the Spitzer Space Telescope; this study is part of the Young Stellar Object VARiability project (YSOVAR). We have collected light curves for 181 cluster members over 40 days. We find a high variability fraction among embedded cluster members of ca. 70%, whereas young stars without a detectable disk display variability less often (in ca. 50% of the cases) and with lower amplitudes. We detect periodic variability for 33 sources with periods primarily in the range of 2-6 days. Practically all embedded periodic sources display additional variability on top of their periodicity. Furthermore, we analyze the slopes of the tracks that our sources span in the color-magnitude diagram (CMD). We find that sources with long variability time scales tend to display CMD slopes that are at least partially influenced by accretion processes, while sources with short variability time scales tend to display extinction-dominated slopes. We find a tentative trend of X-ray detected cluster members to vary on longer time scales than the X-ray undetected members.
  • Resolved submillimeter imaging of transitional disks is increasingly revealing the complexity of disk structure. Here we present the first high-resolution submillimeter image of a recently identified transitional disk around IRAS 04125+2902 in the Taurus star-forming region. We measure an inner disk hole of ~20 AU around IRAS 04125+2902 by simultaneously modeling new 880 micron Submillimeter Array (SMA) data along with an existing spectral energy distribution supplemented by new Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) photometry. We also constrain the outer radius of the dust disk in IRAS~04125+2902 to ~50-60 AU. Such a small dust disk could be attributed to initial formation conditions, outward truncation by an unseen companion, or dust evolution in the disk. Notably, the dust distribution of IRAS 04125+2902 resembles a narrow ring (delta R ~ 35 AU) composed of large dust grains at the location of the disk wall. Such narrow dust rings are also seen in other transitional disks and may be evidence of dust trapping in pressure bumps, possibly produced by planetary companions. More sensitive submillimeter observations of the gas are necessary to further probe the physical mechanisms at work in shaping the spatial distribution of large dust in this disk. Interestingly, the IRAS 04125+2902 disk is significantly fainter than other transitional disks that have been resolved at submillimeter wavelengths, hinting that more objects with large disk holes may exist at the faint end of the submillimeter luminosity distribution that await detection with more sensitive imaging telescopes.
  • We present Herschel Space Observatory PACS spectra of T Tauri stars, in which we detect amorphous and crystalline water ice features. Using irradiated accretion disk models, we determine the disk structure and ice abundance in each of the systems. Combining a model-independent comparison of the ice feature strength and disk size with a detailed analysis of the model ice location, we estimate that the ice emitting region is at disk radii >30AU, consistent with a proto-Kuiper belt. Vertically, the ice emits most below the photodesorption zone, consistent with Herschel observations of cold water vapor. The presence of crystallized water ice at a disk location a) colder than its crystallization temperature and b) where it should have been re-amorphized in ~1 Myr suggests that localized generation is occurring; the most likely cause appears to be micrometeorite impact or planetesimal collisions. Based on simple tests with UV models and different ice distributions, we suggest that the SED shape from 20 to 50 micron may probe the location of the water ice snow line in the disk upper layers. This project represents one of the first extra-solar probes of the spatial structure of the cometary ice reservoir thought to deliver water to terrestrial planets.
  • Transitional disks are protoplanetary disks characterized by reduced near- and mid-infrared emission with respect to full disks. This characteristic spectral energy distribution indicates the presence of an optically thin inner cavity within the dust disk believed to mark the disappearance of the primordial massive disk. We present new Herschel Space Observatory PACS spectra of [OI] 63 micron for 21 transitional disks. Our survey complements the larger Herschel GASPS program "Gas in Protoplanetary Systems" (Dent et al. 2013) by quadrupling the number of transitional disks observed with PACS at this wavelength. [OI] 63 micron traces material in the outer regions of the disk, beyond the inner cavity of most transitional disks. We find that transitional disks have [OI] 63 micron line luminosities two times fainter than their full disk counterparts. We self consistently determine various stellar properties (e.g. bolometric luminosity, FUV excess, etc.) and disk properties (e.g. disk dust mass, etc.) that could influence the [OI] 63 micron line luminosity and we find no correlations that can explain the lower [OI] 63 micron line luminosities in transitional disks. Using a grid of thermo-chemical protoplanetary disk models, we conclude that either transitional disks are less flared than full disks or they possess lower gas-to-dust ratios due to a depletion of gas mass. This result suggests that transitional disks are more evolved than their full disk counterparts, possibly even at large radii.
  • The dust sublimation walls of disks around T Tauri stars represent a directly observable cross-section through the disk atmosphere and midplane. Their emission properties can probe the grain size distribution and composition of the innermost regions of the disk, where terrestrial planets form. Here we calculate the inner dust sublimation wall properties for four classical T Tauri stars with a narrow range of spectral types and inclination angles and a wide range of mass accretion rates to determine the extent to which the walls are radially curved. Best-fits to the near- and mid-IR excesses are found for curved, 2-layer walls in which the lower layer contains larger, hotter, amorphous pyroxene grains with Mg/(Mg+Fe)=0.6 and the upper layer contains submicron, cooler, mixed amorphous olivine and forsterite grains. As the mass accretion rates decrease from 10^(-8) to 10^(-10) Msol/yr, the maximum grain size in the lower layer decreases from 3 to 0.5 microns. We attribute this to a decrease in fragmentation and turbulent support for micron-sized grains with decreasing viscous heating. The atmosphere of these disks is depleted of dust with dust-gas mass ratios 1x10^(-4) of the ISM value, while the midplane is enhanced to 8 times the ISM value. For all accretion rates, the wall contributes at least half of the flux in the optically thin 10 micron silicate feature. Finally, we find evidence for an iron gradient in the disk, suggestive of that found in our solar system.
  • Using NASA IRTF SpeX data from 0.8 to 4.5 $\mu$m, we determine self-consistently the stellar properties and excess emission above the photosphere for a sample of classical T Tauri stars (CTTS) in the Taurus molecular cloud with varying degrees of accretion. This process uses a combination of techniques from the recent literature as well as observations of weak-line T Tauri stars (WTTS) to account for the differences in surface gravity and chromospheric activity between the TTS and dwarfs, which are typically used as photospheric templates for CTTS. Our improved veiling and extinction estimates for our targets allow us to extract flux-calibrated spectra of the excess in the near-infrared. We find that we are able to produce an acceptable parametric fit to the near-infrared excesses using a combination of up to three blackbodies. In half of our sample, two blackbodies at temperatures of 8000 K and 1600 K suffice. These temperatures and the corresponding solid angles are consistent with emission from the accretion shock on the stellar surface and the inner dust sublimation rim of the disk, respectively. In contrast, the other half requires three blackbodies at 8000, 1800, and 800 K, to describe the excess. We interpret the combined two cooler blackbodies as the dust sublimation wall with either a contribution from the disk surface beyond the wall or curvature of the wall itself, neither of which should have single-temperature blackbody emission. In these fits, we find no evidence of a contribution from optically thick gas inside the inner dust rim.
  • High-energy radiation from T Tauri stars (TTS) influences the amount and longevity of gas in disks, thereby playing a crucial role in the creation of gas giant planets. Here we probe the high-energy ionizing radiation from TTS using high-resolution mid-infrared (MIR) Spitzer IRS Neon forbidden line detections in a sample of disks from IC 348, NGC 2068, and Chamaeleon. We report three new detections of [Ne III] from CS Cha, SZ Cha, and T 54, doubling the known number of [Ne III] detections from TTS. Using [Ne III]-to-[Ne II] ratios in conjunction with X-ray emission measurements, we probe high-energy radiation from TTS. The majority of previously inferred [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratios based on [Ne III] line upper limits are significantly less than 1, pointing to the dominance of either X-ray radiation or soft Extreme-Ultraviolet (EUV) radiation in producing these lines. Here we report the first observational evidence for hard EUV dominated Ne forbidden line production in a T Tauri disk: [Ne III]/[Ne II]~1 in SZ Cha. Our results provide a unique insight into the EUV emission from TTS, by suggesting that EUV radiation may dominate the creation of Ne forbidden lines, albeit in a minority of cases.
  • We present Herschel Space Observatory PACS spectra of GQ Lup, a protoplanetary disk in the Lupus star-forming region. Through SED fitting from 0.3{\mu}m to 1.3mm, we construct a self-consistent model of this system's temperature and density structures, finding that although it is 3 Myr old, its dust has not settled to the midplane substantially. The disk has a radial gradient in both the silicate dust composition and grain size, with large amorphous grains in the upper layers of the inner disk and an enhancement of submicron, crystalline grains in the outer disk. We detect an excess of emission in the Herschel PACS B2A band near 63{\mu}m and model it with a combination of {\sim}15 to 70{\mu}m crystalline water ice grains with a size distribution consistent with ice recondensation-enhanced grain growth and a mass fraction half of that of our solar system. The combination of crystalline water ice and silicates in the outer disk is suggestive of disk-wide heating events or planetesimal collisions. If confirmed, this would be the first detection of water ice by Herschel.
  • We report on the {\lambda} = 5-36{\mu}m Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectra of 79 young stellar objects in the very young nearby cluster NGC 1333. NGC 1333's youth enables the study of early protoplanetary disk properties, such as the degree of settling as well as the formation of gaps and clearings. We construct spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using our IRS data as well as published photometry and classify our sample into SED classes. Using "extinction-free" spectral indices, we determine whether the disk, envelope, or photosphere dominates the spectrum. We analyze the dereddened spectra of objects which show disk dominated emission using spectral indices and properties of silicate features in order to study the vertical and radial structure of protoplanetary disks in NGC 1333. At least nine objects in our sample of NGC 1333 show signs of large (several AU) radial gaps or clearings in their inner disk. Disks with radial gaps in NGC 1333 show more-nearly pristine silicate dust than their radially continuous counterparts. We compare properties of disks in NGC 1333 to those in three other well studied regions, Taurus-Auriga, Ophiuchus and Chamaeleon I, and find no difference in their degree of sedimentation and dust processing.
  • Two decades ago "transitional disks" described spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of T Tauri stars with small near-IR excesses, but significant mid- and far-IR excesses. Many inferred this indicated dust-free holes in disks, possibly cleared by planets. Recently, this term has been applied disparately to objects whose Spitzer SEDs diverge from the expectations for a typical full disk. Here we use irradiated accretion disk models to fit the SEDs of 15 such disks in NGC 2068 and IC 348. One group has a "dip" in infrared emission while the others' continuum emission decreases steadily at all wavelengths. We find that the former have an inner disk hole or gap at intermediate radii in the disk and we call these objects "transitional" and pre-transitional" disks, respectively. For the latter group, we can fit these SEDs with full disk models and find that millimeter data are necessary to break the degeneracy between dust settling and disk mass. We suggest the term "transitional" only be applied to objects that display evidence for a radical change in the disk's radial structure. Using this definition, we find that transitional and pre-transitional disks tend to have lower mass accretion rates than full disks and that transitional disks have lower accretion rates than pre-transitional disks. These reduced accretion rates onto the star could be linked to forming planets. Future observations of transitional and pre-transitional disks will allow us to better quantify the signatures of planet formation in young disks.
  • We present 5 to 36 micron mid-infrared spectra of 82 young stars in the ~2 Myr old Chamaeleon I star-forming region, obtained with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). We have classified these objects into various evolutionary classes based on their spectral energy distributions and the spectral features seen in the IRS spectra. We have analyzed the mid-IR spectra of Class II objects in Chamaeleon I in detail, in order to study the vertical and radial structure of the protoplanetary disks surrounding these stars. We find evidence for substantial dust settling in most protoplanetary disks in Chamaeleon I. We have identified several disks with altered radial structures in Chamaeleon I, among them transitional disk candidates which have holes or gaps in their disks. Analysis of the silicate emission features in the IRS spectra of Class II objects in Chamaeleon I shows that the dust grains in these disks have undergone significant processing (grain growth and crystallization). However, disks with radial holes/gaps appear to have relatively unprocessed grains. We further find the crystalline dust content in the inner (< 1-2 AU) and the intermediate (< 10 AU) regions of the protoplanetary disks to be tightly correlated. We also investigate the effects of accretion and stellar multiplicity on the disk structure and dust properties. Finally, we compare the observed properties of protoplanetary disks in Cha I with those in slightly younger Taurus and Ophiuchus regions and discuss the effects of disk evolution in the first 1-2 Myr.
  • We present a Spitzer IRS study of variability in 14 T Tauri stars in the Taurus and Chamaeleon star-forming regions. The sample is composed of transitional and pre-transitional objects which contain holes and gaps in their disks. We detect variability between 5-38 microns in all but two of our objects on timescales of 2-3 years. Most of the variability observed can be classified as seesaw behavior, whereby the emission at shorter wavelengths varies inversely with the emission at longer wavelengths. For many of the objects we can reasonably reproduce the observed variability using irradiated disk models, particularly by changing the height of the inner disk wall by ~20%. When the inner wall is taller, the emission at the shorter wavelengths is higher since the inner wall dominates the emission at 2-8 microns. The taller inner wall casts a larger shadow on the outer disk wall, leading to less emission at wavelengths beyond 20 microns where the outer wall dominates. We discuss how the possible presence of planets in these disks could lead to warps which cause changes in the height of the inner wall. We also find that crystalline silicates are common in the outer disks of our objects and that in the four disks in the sample with the most crystalline silicates, variability on timescales of 1 week is present. In addition to explaining the infrared variability described above, planets can create shocks and collisions which can crystallize the dust and lead to short timescale variability.
  • We have analyzed nearly all images of the Taurus star-forming region at 3.6-24um that were obtained during the cryogenic mission of the Spitzer Space Telescope (46 deg^2) and have measured photometry for all known members of the region that are within these data, corresponding to 348 sources. We have classified the members of Taurus according to whether they show evidence of disks and envelopes (classes I, II, and III). The disk fraction in Taurus is 75% for solar-mass stars and declines to 45% for low-mass stars and brown dwarfs (0.01-0.3 M_sun). This dependence on stellar mass is similar to that measured for Cha I, although the disk fraction in Taurus is slightly higher overall, probably because of its younger age (1 vs. 2-3 Myr). In comparison, the disk fraction for solar-mass stars is much lower (20%) in IC 348 and Sigma Ori, which are denser than Taurus and Cha I and are roughly coeval with the latter. These data indicate that disk lifetimes for solar-mass stars are longer in regions that have lower stellar densities. Through an analysis of multiple epochs of photometry that are available for ~200 Taurus members, we find that stars with disks exhibit significantly greater mid-IR variability than diskless stars. Finally, we have used our data in Taurus to refine the criteria for primordial, evolved, and transitional disks. The number ratio of evolved and transitional disks to primordial disks in Taurus is 15/98 for K5-M5, indicating a timescale of 0.15 x tau(primordial)=0.45 Myr for the clearing of the inner regions of optically thick disks. After applying the same criteria to older clusters (2-10 Myr), we find that the proportions of evolved and transitional disks in those populations are consistent with the measurements in Taurus when their star formation histories are properly taken into account. ERRATUM: In Table 7, we inadvertently omitted the spectral type bins in which class II sources were placed in Table 8 based on their bolometric luminosities (applies only to stars that lack spectroscopic classifications). The bins were K6-M3.5 for FT Tau, DK Tau B, and IRAS 04370+2559, M3.5-M6 for IRAS 04200+2759, IT Tau B, and ITG 1, and M6-M8 for IRAS 04325+2402 C. In addition, the values of K_s-[3.6] in Table 13 and Figure 26 for spectral types of M4-M9 are incorrect. We present corrected versions of Table 13 and Figure 26.
  • In the past few years, several disks with inner holes that are empty of small dust grains have been detected and are known as transitional disks. Recently, Spitzer has identified a new class of "pre-transitional disks" with gaps; these objects have an optically thick inner disk separated from an optically thick outer disk by an optically thin disk gap. A near-infrared spectrum provided the first confirmation of a gap in the pre-transitional disk of LkCa 15 by verifying that the near-infrared excess emission in this object was due to an optically thick inner disk. Here we investigate the difference between the nature of the inner regions of transitional and pre-transitional disks using the same veiling-based technique to extract the near-infrared excess emission above the stellar photosphere. We show that the near-infrared excess emission of the previously identified pre-transitional disks of LkCa 15 and UX Tau A in Taurus as well as the newly identified pre-transitional disk of ROX 44 in Ophiuchus can be fit with an inner disk wall located at the dust destruction radius. We also model the broad-band SEDs of these objects, taking into account the effect of shadowing by the inner disk on the outer disk, considering the finite size of the star. The near-infrared excess continua of these three pre-transitional disks, which can be explained by optically thick inner disks, are significantly different from that of the transitional disks of GM Aur, whose near-infrared excess continuum can be reproduced by emission from sub-micron-sized optically thin dust, and DM Tau, whose near-infrared spectrum is consistent with a disk hole that is relatively free of small dust. The structure of pre-transitional disks may be a sign of young planets forming in these disks and future studies of pre-transitional disks will provide constraints to aid in theoretical modeling of planet formation.
  • We analyze samples of Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra of T Tauri stars in the Ophiuchus, Taurus, and Chamaeleon I star-forming regions, whose median ages lie in the <1 to 2 Myr range. The median mid-infrared spectra of objects in these three regions are similar in shape, suggesting, on average, similar disk structures. When normalized to the same stellar luminosity, the medians follow each other closely, implying comparable mid-infrared excess emission from the circumstellar disks. We use the spectral index between 13 and 31 micron and the equivalent width of the 10 micron silicate emission feature to identify objects whose disk configuration departs from that of a continuous, optically thick accretion disk. Transitional disks, whose steep 13-31 micron spectral slope and near-IR flux deficit reveal inner disk clearing, occur with about the same frequency of a few percent in all three regions. Objects with unusually large 10 micron equivalent widths are more common (20-30%); they could reveal the presence of disk gaps filled with optically thin dust. Based on their medians and fraction of evolved disks, T Tauri stars in Taurus and Chamaeleon I are very alike. Disk evolution sets in early, since already the youngest region, the Ophiuchus core (L1688), has more settled disks with larger grains. Our results indicate that protoplanetary disks show clear signs of dust evolution at an age of a few Myr, even as early as ~1 Myr, but age is not the only factor determining the degree of evolution during the first few million years of a disk's lifetime.
  • Here we present the Spitzer IRS spectrum of CVSO 224, the sole transitional disk located within the ~10 Myr old 25 Orionis group in Orion OB1a. A model fit to the spectral energy distribution of this object indicates a ~7 AU inner disk hole that contains a small amount of optically thin dust. In previous studies, CVSO 224 had been classified as a weak-line T Tauri star based on its Halpha equivalent width, but here we find an accretion rate of 7x10^-11 Msun/yr based on high-resolution Hectochelle data. CVSO 224's low mass accretion rate is in line with photoevaporative clearing theories. However, the Spitzer IRS spectrum of CVSO 224 has a substantial mid-infrared excess beyond 20microns which indicates that it is surrounded by a massive outer disk. Millimeter measurements are necessary to constrain the mass of the outer disk around CVSO 224 in order to confirm that photoevaporation is not the mechanism behind creating its inner disk hole.
  • We present the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectrum of SR20, a 5--10 AU binary T Tauri system in the $\rho$ Ophiuchi star forming region. The spectrum has features consistent with the presence of a disk; however, the continuum slope is steeper than the $\lambda^{-4/3}$ slope of an infinite geometrically thin, optically thick disk, indicating that the disk is outwardly truncated. Comparison with photometry from the literature shows a large increase in the mid-infrared flux from 1993 to 1996. We model the spectral energy distribution and IRS spectrum with a wall + optically thick irradiated disk, yielding an outer radius of 0.39$_{+0.03}^{-0.01}$ AU, much smaller than predicted by models of binary orbits. Using a two temperature $\chi^2$ minimization model to fit the dust composition of the IRS spectrum, we find the disk has experienced significant grain growth: its spectrum is well-fit using opacities of grains larger than 1 $\mu$m. We conclude that the system experienced a significant gravitational perturbation in the 1990s.
  • Quasi-periodic signals have yielded important constraints on the masses of black holes in galactic X-ray binaries, and here we extend this to active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We employ a wavelet technique to analyze 19 observations of 10 AGNs obtained with the XMM-Newton EPIC pn camera. We report the detection of a candidate 3.3 ks quasi period in 3C 273. If this period represents an orbital timescale originating near a last stable orbit of 3Rs, it implies a central black hole mass of 7.3x10^6 Msun. For a maximally rotating black hole with a last stable orbit of 0.6Rs, a central black hole mass of 8.1x10^7 Msun is implied. Both of these estimates are substantially lower than previous reverberation-mapping results, which place the central black hole mass of 3C 273 at about 2.35 x10^8 Msun. Assuming that this reverberation mass is correct, the X-ray quasi period would be caused by a higher order oscillatory mode of the accretion disk.
  • Using SpeX at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph, we have obtained infrared spectra from 0.7 to 30um for three young brown dwarfs in the TW Hydra Association (~10 Myr), 2M J1207-3932, 2M J1139-3159, and SS J1102-3431. The spectral energy distribution for 2M J1139-3159 is consistent with a stellar photosphere for the entire wavelength range of our data while the other two objects exhibit significant excess emission at >5um. We are able to reproduce the excess emission from each brown dwarf using our models of irradiated accretion disks. According to our model fits, both disks have experienced a high degree of dust settling. We also find that silicate emission at 10 and 20um is absent from the spectra of these disks, indicating that grains in the upper disk layers have grown to sizes larger than ~5um. Both of these characteristics are consistent with previous observations of decreasing silicate emission with lower stellar masses and older ages. These trends suggest that either 1) the growth of dust grains, and perhaps planetesimal formation, occurs faster in disks around brown dwarfs than in disks around stars, or 2) the radii of the mid-IR-emitting regions of disks are smaller for brown dwarfs than for stars, and grains grow faster at smaller disk radii. Finally, we note the possible detection of an unexplained emission feature near 14um in the spectra of both of the disk-bearing brown dwarfs.
  • The recently recognized class of "transitional disk" systems consists of young starswith optically-thick outer disks but inner disks which are mostly devoid of small dust. Here we introduce a further class of "pre-transitional disks" with significant near-infrared excesses which indicate the presence of an optically thick inner disk separated from an optically thick outer disk; thus, the spectral energy distributions of pre-transitional disks suggest the incipient development of disk gaps rather than inner holes. In UX Tau A, our analysis of the Spitzer IRS spectrum finds that the near-infrared excess is produced by an inner optically thick disk and a gap of ~56 AU is present. The Spitzer IRS spectrum of LkCa 15 is suggestive of a gap of ~46 AU, confirming previous millimeter imaging. In addition, UX Tau A contains crystalline silicates in its disk at radii >~ 56 AU which poses a challenge to our understanding of the production of this crystalline material. In contrast, LkCa 15's silicates are amorphous and pristine. UX Tau A and LkCa 15 increase our knowledge of the diversity of dust clearing in low-mass star formation.
  • The rapid localization of GRB 021004 by the HETE-2 satellite allowed nearly continuous monitoring of its early optical afterglow decay, as well as high-quality optical spectra that determined a redshift of z3=2.328 for its host galaxy, an active starburst galaxy with strong Lyman-alpha emission and several absorption lines. Spectral observations show multiple absorbers at z3A=2.323, z3B= 2.317, and z3C= 2.293 blueshifted by 450, 990, and 3,155 km/s respectively relative to the host galaxy Lyman-alpha emission. We argue that these correspond to a fragmented shell nebula that has been radiatively accelerated by the gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow at a distance greater than 0.3 pc from a Wolf-Rayet star progenitor. The chemical abundance ratios indicate that the nebula is overabundant in carbon and silicon. The high level of carbon and silicon is consistent with a swept-up shell nebula gradually enriched by a WCL progenitor wind over the lifetime of the nebula prior to the GRB onset. The detection of statistically significant fluctuations and color changes about the jet-like optical decay further supports this interpretation since fluctuations must be present at some level due to inhomogeneities in a clumpy stellar wind medium or if the progenitor has undergone massive ejection prior to the GRB onset. This evidence suggests that the mass-loss process in a Wolf-Rayet star might lead naturally to an iron-core collapse with sufficient angular momentum that could serve as a suitable GRB progenitor.