• The material class of rare earth nickelates with high Ni$^{3+}$ oxidation state is generating continued interest due to the occurrence of a metal-insulator transition with charge order and the appearance of non-collinear magnetic phases within this insulating regime. The recent theoretical prediction for superconductivity in LaNiO$_3$ thin films has also triggered intensive research efforts. LaNiO$_3$ seems to be the only rare earth nickelate that stays metallic and paramagnetic down to lowest temperatures. So far, centimetre-sized impurity-free single crystal growth has not been reported for the rare earth nickelates material class since elevated oxygen pressures are required for their synthesis. Here, we report on the successful growth of centimetre-sized LaNiO$_3$ single crystals by the floating zone technique at oxygen pressures of up to 150 bar. Our crystals are essentially free from Ni$^{2+}$ impurities and exhibit metallic properties together with an unexpected but clear antiferromagnetic transition.
  • We report on our investigation of the electronic structure of Ti$_2$O$_3$ using (hard) x-ray photoelectron and soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy. From the distinct satellite structures in the spectra we have been able to establish unambiguously that the Ti-Ti $c$-axis dimer in the corundum crystal structure is electronically present and forms an $a_{1g}a_{1g}$ molecular singlet in the low temperature insulating phase. Upon heating we observed a considerable spectral weight transfer to lower energies with orbital reconstruction. The insulator-metal transition may be viewed as a transition from a solid of isolated Ti-Ti molecules into a solid of electronically partially broken dimers where the Ti ions acquire additional hopping in the $a$-$b$ plane via the $e_g^{\pi}$ channel, the opening of which requires the consideration of the multiplet structure of the on-site Coulomb interaction.
  • Fe3O4 (magnetite) is one of the most elusive quantum materials and at the same time one of the most studied transition metal oxide materials for thin film applications. The theoretically expected half-metallic behavior generates high expectations that it can be used in spintronic devices. Yet, despite the tremendous amount of work devoted to preparing thin films, the enigmatic first order metal-insulator transition and the hall mark of magnetite known as the Verwey transition, is in thin films extremely broad and occurs at substantially lower temperatures as compared to that in high quality bulk single crystals. Here we have succeeded in finding and making a particular class of substrates that allows the growth of magnetite thin films with the Verwey transition as sharp as in the bulk. Moreover, we are now able to tune the transition temperature and, using tensile strain, increase it to substantially higher values than in the bulk.
  • Polar catastrophe at the interface of oxide materials with strongly correlated electrons has triggered a flurry of new research activities. The expectations are that the design of such advanced interfaces will become a powerful route to engineer devices with novel functionalities. Here we investigate the initial stages of growth and the electronic structure of the spintronic Fe3O4/MgO (001) interface. Using soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy we have discovered that the so-called A-sites are completely missing in the first Fe3O4 monolayer. This allows us to develop an unexpected but elegant growth principle in which during deposition the Fe atoms are constantly on the move to solve the divergent electrostatic potential problem, thereby ensuring epitaxy and stoichiometry at the same time. This growth principle provides a new perspective for the design of interfaces.
  • We have carried out a systematic experimental investigation to address the question why thin films of Fe$_3$O$_4$ (magnetite) generally have a very broad Verwey transition with lower transition temperatures as compared to the bulk. We observed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and resistivity measurements that the Verwey transition in thin films is drastically influenced not only by the oxygen stoichiometry but especially also by the substrate-induced microstructure. In particular, we found (1) that the transition temperature, the resistivity jump, and the conductivity gap of fully stoichiometric films greatly depends on the domain size, which increases gradually with increasing film thickness, (2) that the broadness of the transition scales with the width of the domain size distribution, and (3) that the hysteresis width is affected strongly by the presence of antiphase boundaries. Films grown on MgO (001) substrates showed the highest and sharpest transitions, with a 200 nm film having a T$_V$ of 122K, which is close to the bulk value. Films grown on substrates with large lattice constant mismatch revealed very broad transitions, and yet, all films show a transition with a hysteresis behavior, indicating that the transition is still first order rather than higher order.
  • The standard way to find the orbital occupation of Jahn-Teller (JT) ions is to use structural data, with the assumption of a one-to-one correspondence between the orbital occupation and the associated JT distortion, e.g. in O6 octahedron. We show, however, that this approach in principle does not work for layered systems. Specifically, using the layered manganite La0.5Sr1.5MnO4 as an example, we found from our x-ray absorption measurements and theoretical calculations, that the type of orbital ordering strongly contradicts the standard local distortion approach for the Mn3+O6 octahedra, and that the generally ignored long-range crystal field effect and anisotropic hopping integrals are actually crucial to determine the orbital occupation. Our findings may open a pathway to control of the orbital state in multilayer systems and thus of their physical properties.
  • We studied the (001/2) diffraction peak in the low-temperature phase of magnetite (Fe3O4) using resonant soft x-ray diffraction (RSXD) at the Fe-L2,3 and O-K resonance. We studied both molecular-beam-epitaxy (MBE) grown thin films and in-situ cleaved single crystals. From the comparison we have been able to determine quantitatively the contribution of intrinsic absorption effects, thereby arriving at a consistent result for the (001/2) diffraction peak spectrum. Our data also allow for the identification of extrinsic effects, e.g. for a detailed modeling of the spectra in case a "dead" surface layer is present that is only absorbing photons but does not contribute to the scattering signal.
  • We have succeeded in preparing high-quality Gd-doped single-crystalline EuO films. Using Eu-distillation-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and a systematic variation in the Gd and oxygen deposition rates, we have been able to observe sustained layer-by-layer epitaxial growth on yttria-stabilized cubic zirconia (001). The presence of Gd helps to stabilize the layer-by-layer growth mode. We used soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Eu and Gd M4,5 edges to confirm the absence of Eu3+ contaminants and to determine the actual Gd concentration. The distillation process ensures the absence of oxygen vacancies in the films. From magnetization measurements we found the Curie temperature to increase smoothly as a function of doping from 70 K up to a maximum of 125 K. A threshold behavior was not observed for concentrations as low as 0.2%.
  • We have succeeded in growing epitaxial and highly stoichiometric films of EuO on yttria-stabilized cubic zirconia (YSZ) (001). The use of the Eu-distillation process during the molecular beam epitaxy assisted growth enables the consistent achievement of stoichiometry. We have also succeeded in growing the films in a layer-by-layer fashion by fine tuning the Eu vs. oxygen deposition rates. The initial stages of growth involve the limited supply of oxygen from the YSZ substrate, but the EuO stoichiometry can still be well maintained. The films grown were sufficiently smooth so that the capping with a thin layer of aluminum was leak tight and enabled ex situ experiments free from trivalent Eu species. The findings were used to obtain recipes for better epitaxial growth of EuO on MgO (001).
  • We studied the stripe phase of La1.8Sr0.2NiO4 using neutron diffraction, resonant soft x-ray diffraction (RSXD) at the Ni L2,3 edges, and resonant x-ray diffraction (RXD) at the Ni K threshold. Differences in the q-space resolution of the different techniques have to be taken into account for a proper evaluation of diffraction intensities associated with the spin and charge order superstructures. We find that in the RSXD experiment the spin and charge order peaks show the same temperature dependence. In the neutron experiment by contrast, the spin and charge signals follow quite different temperature behaviors. We infer that fluctuating magnetic order contributes considerably to the magnetic RSXD signal and we suggest that this result may open an interesting experimental approach to search for fluctuating order in other systems by comparing RSXD and neutron diffraction data.
  • Using Co-L_(2,3) and O-K x-ray absorption spectroscopy, we reveal that the charge ordering in La_(1.5)Sr_(0.5)CoO4 involves high spin (S=3/2) Co^2+ and low spin (S=0) Co^3+ ions. This provides evidence for the spin blockade phenomenon as a source for the extremely insulating nature of the La_(2-x)Sr_(x)CoO4 series. The associated e_g^2 and e_g^0 orbital occupation accounts for the large contrast in the Co-O bond lengths, and in turn, the high charge ordering temperature. Yet, the low magnetic ordering temperature is naturally explained by the presence of the non-magnetic (S=0) Co^3+ ions. From the identification of the bands we infer that La_(1.5)Sr_(0.5)CoO4 is a narrow band material.
  • We compare for Ho metal the x-ray absorption spectrum and the resonant soft x-ray diffraction spectra obtained at the $3d_{5/2} \to 4f$ ($M_5$) resonance for the magnetic 1st and 2nd order diffraction peaks $(0,0,\tau)$ and $(0,0,2\tau)$ with the result of an atomic multiplet calculation. We find a good agreement between experiment and simulation giving evidence that this kind of simulation is well suited to quantitatively analyze resonant soft x-ray diffraction data from correlated electron systems.
  • We studied the resonant diffraction signal from stepped surfaces of SrTiO3 at the Ti 2p -> 3d (L2,3) resonance in comparison with x-ray absorption (XAS) and specular reflectivity data. The steps on the surface form an artificial superstructure suited as a model system for resonant soft x-ray diffraction. A small step density on the surface is sufficient to produce a well defined diffraction peak, showing the high sensitivity of the method. At larger incidence angles, the resonant diffraction spectrum from the steps on the surface resembles the spectrum for specular reflectivity. Both deviate from the XAS data in the relative peak intensities and positions of the peak maxima. We determined the optical parameters of the sample across the resonance and found that the differences between the XAS and scattering spectra reflect the different quantities probed in the different signals. When recorded at low incidence or detection angles, XAS and specular reflectivity spectra are distorted by the changes of the angle of total reflection with energy. Also the step peak spectra, though less affected, show an energy shift of the peak maxima in grazing incidence geometry.
  • Using x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Rh-L_2,3, Co-L_2,3, and Fe-L_2,3 edges, we find a valence state of Co^2+/Rh^4+ in Ca3CoRhO6 and of Fe^3+/Rh^3+ in Ca3FeRhO6. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy at the Co-L_2,3 edge of Ca3CoRhO6 reveals a giant orbital moment of about 1.7mu_B, which can be attributed to the occupation of the minority-spin d_0d_2 orbital state of the high-spin Co^2+ (3d^7) ions in trigonal prismatic coordination. This active role of the spin-orbit coupling explains the strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy and Ising-like magnetism of Ca3CoRhO6.
  • Using soft-x-ray diffraction at the site-specific resonances in the Fe L23 edge, we find clear evidence for orbital and charge ordering in magnetite below the Verwey transition. The spectra show directly that the (001/2) diffraction peak (in cubic notation) is caused by t2g orbital ordering at octahedral Fe2+ sites and the (001) by a spatial modulation of the t2g occupation.
  • We infer that soft-x-ray absorption spectroscopy is a versatile method for the determination of the crystal-field ground state symmetry of rare earth Heavy Fermion systems, complementing neutron scattering. Using realistic and universal parameters, we provide a theoretical mapping between the polarization dependence of Ce $M_{4,5}$ spectra and the charge distribution of the Ce $4f$ states. The experimental resolution can be orders of magnitude larger than the $4f$ crystal field splitting itself. To demonstrate the experimental feasibility of the method, we investigated CePd$_2$Si$_2$, thereby settling an existing disagreement about its crystal-field ground state.
  • We report on the growth and characterization of ferromagnetic Gd-doped EuO thin films. We prepared samples with Gd concentrations up to 11% by means of molecular beam epitaxy under distillation conditions, which allows a very precise control of the doping concentration and oxygen stoichiometry. Using soft x-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the Eu and Gd M4,5 edges, we found that the Curie temperature ranged from 69 K for pure stoichiometric EuO to about 170 K for the film with the optimal Gd doping of around 4%. We also show that the Gd magnetic moment couples ferromagnetically to that of Eu.
  • Strong resonant enhancements of the charge-order and spin-order superstructure-diffraction intensities in La1.8Sr0.2NiO4 are observed when x-ray energies in the vicinity of the Ni L2,3 absorption edges are used. The pronounced photon-energy and polarization dependences of these diffraction intensities allow for a critical determination of the local symmetry of the ordered spin and charge carriers. We found that not only the antiferromagnetic order but also the charge-order superstructure resides within the NiO2 layers; the holes are mainly located on in-plane oxygens surrounding a Ni2+ site with the spins coupled antiparallel in close analogy to Zhang-Rice singlets in the cuprates.
  • We found that the conventional model of orbital ordering of 3x^2-r^2/3y^2-r^2 type in the eg states of La_0.5Sr_1.5MnO_4 is incompatible with measurements of linear dichroism in the Mn 2p-edge x-ray absorption, whereas these eg states exhibit predominantly cross-type orbital ordering of x^2-z^2/y^2-z^2. LDA+U band-structure calculations reveal that such a cross-type orbital ordering results from a combined effect of antiferromagnetic structure, Jahn-Teller distortion, and on-site Coulomb interactions.
  • With on- and off- resonant excitation photons, spin-resolved Auger electron spectra of epitaxial CrO$_{2}$ thin films show an experimental evidence of the spin-selective KLL Auger decay. The on-resonance O KLL Auger electrons are found to be highly spin-polarized, while the off-resonance ones with almost zero spin polarization. These results lead to conclude that the two-hole final state in KLL Auger decay is a spin-singlet. Applications to spin-resolved absorption spectroscopy are discussed.
  • Very recently impurity scattering effects on quasiparticles in d-wave superconductors have attracted much attention. Especially, the thermodynamic properties in magnetic fields H are of interest. We have measured the low-temperature specific heat C(T,H) of La_1.78Sr_0.22Cu_1-xNi_xO4. For the first time, the impurity scattering effects on C(T,H) of cuprate superconductors were clearly observed, and are compared with theory of d-wave superconductivity. It is found that impurity scattering leads to gamma(H)=gamma(0)(1+D((H/H_c2)(ln(H_c2/H)) in small magnetic fields. Most amazingly, the scaling of C(T,H) breaks down due to impurity scattering.
  • We have measured low-temperature specific heat C(T, H) of La1.9Sr0.1Cu1-xZnxO4 (x=0, 0.01, and 0.02) both in zero and applied magnetic fields. A pronounced dip of C/T below 2 K was first observed in Zn-doped samples, which is absent in the nominally clean one. If the origin of the dip in C/T is electronic, the quasiparticle density of states N(E) in Zn-doped samples may be depressed below a small energy scale E0. The present data can be well described by the model N(E)=N(0)+alphaE^1/2, with a non-zero N(0) and positive alpha. Magnetic fields depress N(0) and lead to an increase in E0, while leaving the energy dependence of N(E) unchanged. This novel depression of N(E) below E0 in impurity-doped cuprates can not be reconciled with the semi-classical self-consistent approximation model. Discussions in the framework based on the non-linear sigma model field theory and other possible explanations are presented in this Letter.