• Jupiter's radio emission has been linked to its planetary-scale magnetic field, and spacecraft investigations have revealed that most planets, and some moons, have or had a global magnetic field. Generated by internal dynamos, magnetic fields are one of the few remote sensing means of constraining the properties of planetary interiors. For the Earth, its magnetic field has been speculated to be partially responsible for its habitability, and knowledge of an extrasolar planet's magnetic field may be necessary to assess its habitability. The radio emission from Jupiter and other solar system planets is produced by an electron cyclotron maser, and detections of extrasolar planetary electron cyclotron masers will enable measurements of extrasolar planetary magnetic fields. This white paper draws heavily on the W. M. Keck Institute for Space Studies report Planetary Magnetic Fields: Planetary Interiors and Habitability (Lazio, Shkolnik, Hallinan, et al.), it incorporates topics discussed at the American Astronomical Society Topical Conference "Radio Exploration of Planetary Habitability," it complements the Astrobiology Science Strategy white paper "Life Beyond the Solar System: Space Weather and Its Impact on Habitable Worlds" (Airapetian et al.), and it addresses aspects of planetary magnetic fields discussed in the NASA Astrobiology Strategy.
  • It is currently unknown how common life is on exoplanets, or how long planets can remain viable for life. To date, we have a superficial notion of habitability, a necessary first step, but so far lacking an understanding of the detailed interaction between stars and planets over geological timescales, dynamical evolution of planetary systems, and atmospheric evolution on planets in other systems. A planet mass, net insolation, and atmospheric composition alone are insufficient to determine the probability that life on a planet could arise or be detected. The latter set of planetary considerations, among others, underpin the concept of the habitable zone (HZ), defined as the circumstellar region where standing bodies of liquid water could be supported on the surface of a rocky planet. However, stars within the same spectral class are often treated in the same way in HZ studies, without any regard for variations in activity among individual stars. Such formulations ignore differences in how nonthermal emission and magnetic energy of transient events in different stars affect the ability of an exoplanet to retain its atmosphere.In the last few years there has been a growing appreciation that the atmospheric chemistry, and even retention of an atmosphere in many cases, depends critically on the high-energy radiation and particle environments around these stars. Indeed, recent studies have shown stellar activity and the extreme space weather, such as that created by the frequent flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from the active stars and young Sun, may have profoundly affected the chemistry and climate and thus habitability of the early Earth and terrestrial type exoplanets. The goal of this white paper is to identify and describe promising key research goals to aid the field of the exoplanetary habitability for the next 20 years.
  • The search of life in the Universe is a fundamental problem of astrobiology and a major priority for NASA. A key area of major progress since the NASA Astrobiology Strategy 2015 (NAS15) has been a shift from the exoplanet discovery phase to a phase of characterization and modeling of the physics and chemistry of exoplanetary atmospheres, and the development of observational strategies for the search for life in the Universe by combining expertise from four NASA science disciplines including heliophysics, astrophysics, planetary science and Earth science. The NASA Nexus for Exoplanetary System Science (NExSS) has provided an efficient environment for such interdisciplinary studies. Solar flares, coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles produce disturbances in interplanetary space collectively referred to as space weather, which interacts with the Earth upper atmosphere and causes dramatic impact on space and ground-based technological systems. Exoplanets within close in habitable zones around M dwarfs and other active stars are exposed to extreme ionizing radiation fluxes, thus making exoplanetary space weather (ESW) effects a crucial factor of habitability. In this paper, we describe the recent developments and provide recommendations in this interdisciplinary effort with the focus on the impacts of ESW on habitability, and the prospects for future progress in searching for signs of life in the Universe as the outcome of the NExSS workshop held in Nov 29 - Dec 2, 2016, New Orleans, LA. This is one of five Life Beyond the Solar System white papers submitted by NExSS to the National Academy of Sciences in support of the Astrobiology Science Strategy for the Search for Life in the Universe.
  • Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental plasma process involving an exchange of magnetic energy to plasma kinetic energy through changes in the magnetic field topology. In many astrophysical plasmas magnetic reconnection plays a key role in the release of large amounts of energy \cite{hoshino1}, although making direct measurements is challenging in the case of high-energy astrophysical systems such as pulsar wind emissions \cite{lyubarsky1}, gamma-ray bursts \cite{thompson1}, and jets from active galactic nuclei \cite{liu1}. Therefore, laboratory studies of magnetic reconnection provide an important platform for testing theories and characterising different regimes. Here we present experimental measurements as well as numerical modeling of relativistic magnetic reconnection driven by short-pulse, high-intensity lasers that produce relativistic plasma along with extremely strong magnetic fields. Evidence of magnetic reconnection was identified by the plasma's X-ray emission patterns, changes to the electron energy spectrum, and by measuring the time over which reconnection occurs. Accessing these relativistic conditions in the laboratory allows for further investigation that may provide insight into unresolved areas in space and astro-physics.