• We present the detection of four far-infrared fine-structure oxygen lines, as well as strong upper limits for the CO(2-1) and [N II] 205 um lines, in 3C 368, a well-studied radio-loud galaxy at z = 1.131. These new oxygen lines, taken in conjunction with previously observed neon and carbon fine-structure lines, suggest a powerful active galactic nucleus (AGN), accompanied by vigorous and extended star formation. A starburst dominated by O8 stars, with an age of ~6.5 Myr, provides a good fit to the fine-structure line data. This estimated age of the starburst makes it nearly concurrent with the latest episode of AGN activity, suggesting a link between the growth of the supermassive black hole and stellar population in this source. We do not detect the CO(2-1) line, down to a level twelve times lower than the expected value for star forming galaxies. This lack of CO line emission is consistent with recent star formation activity if the star-forming molecular gas has low metallicity, is highly fractionated (such that CO is photodissociated through much of the clouds), or is chemically very young (such that CO has not yet had time to form). It is also possible, though we argue unlikely, that the ensemble of fine structure lines are emitted from the region heated by the AGN.
  • We study the properties of the interstellar medium in the interacting system BR1202-0725 at z=4.7 via its [NII] and [CII] fine-structure line emission. This system consists of a QSO, a sub-mm galaxy (SMG), and two Ly-alpha emitters (LAEs). Such a diversity in galaxy properties makes BR1202-0725 a unique laboratory of star formation and galaxy evolution at high redshift. We present ionized nitrogen ([NII] 205 micron) observations of this system, obtained with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. We find no [NII] emission at the quasar location, but tentative [NII] line detections associated with the SMG and one of the LAEs. Together with available ionized carbon ([CII] 158 micron) ALMA observations of this system, we find the following: The [CII]/[NII] luminosity ratio is >5.5 for the QSO and the SMG, but it is as low as ~2 in the LAE, suggesting that, in this source, most of the [CII] emission is associated with the ionized medium (HII regions) rather than the neutral one (PDRs). This study demonstrates the importance of combined studies of multiple fine--structure lines in order to pin down the physical properties of the interstellar medium in distant galaxies.
  • We have detected the CO(6-5), CO(7-6), and [CI] 370 micron lines from the nuclear region of NGC 891 with our submillimeter grating spectrometer ZEUS on the CSO. These lines provide constraints on photodissociation region (PDR) and shock models that have been invoked to explain the H_2 S(0), S(1), and S(2) lines observed with Spitzer. We analyze our data together with the H_2 lines, CO(3-2), and IR continuum from the literature using a combined PDR/shock model. We find that the mid-J CO originates almost entirely from shock-excited warm molecular gas; contributions from PDRs are negligible. Also, almost all the H_2 S(2) and half of the S(1) line is predicted to emerge from shocks. Shocks with a pre-shock density of 2x10^4 cm^-3 and velocities of 10 km/s and 20 km/s for C-shocks and J-shocks, respectively, provide the best fit. In contrast, the [CI] line emission arises exclusively from the PDR component, which is best parameterized by a density of 3.2x10^3 cm^-3 and a FUV field of G_o = 100 for both PDR/shock-type combinations. Our mid-J CO observations show that turbulence is a very important heating source in molecular clouds, even in normal quiescent galaxies. The most likely energy sources for the shocks are supernovae or outflows from YSOs. The energetics of these shock sources favor C-shock excitation of the lines.
  • We have detected the 158 {\mu}m [CII] line from 12 galaxies at z~1-2. This is the first survey of this important starformation tracer at redshifts covering the epoch of maximum star-formation in the Universe and quadruples the number of reported high z [CII] detections. The line is very luminous, between <0.024-0.65% of the far-infrared continuum luminosity of our sources, and arises from PDRs on molecular cloud surfaces. An exception is PKS 0215+015, where half of the [CII] emission could arise from XDRs near the central AGN. The L[CII] /LFIR ratio in our star-formation-dominated systems is ~8 times larger than that of our AGN-dominated systems. Therefore this ratio selects for star-formation-dominated systems. Furthermore, the L[CII]/LFIR and L[CII]/L(CO(1-0)) ratios in our starforming galaxies and nearby starburst galaxies are the same, so that luminous starforming galaxies at earlier epochs (z~1-2) appear to be scaled up versions of local starbursts entailing kilo-parsec-scale starbursts. Most of the FIR and [CII] radiation from our AGN-dominated sample (excepting PKS 0215+015) also arises from kpc scale starformation, but with far-UV radiation fields ~8 times more intense than in our star-formation-dominated sample. We speculate that the onset of AGN activity stimulates large-scale star-formation activity within AGN-dominated systems. This idea is supported by the relatively strong [OIII] line emission, indicating very young stars, that was recently observed in high z composite AGN/starburst systems. Our results confirm the utility of the [CII] line, and in particular, the L[CII]/L(FIR) and L[CII]/LCO(1-0) ratios as a tracers of star-formation in galaxies at high redshifts.
  • We have made the first detections of the 88 micron [OIII] line from galaxies in the early Universe, detecting the line from the lensed AGN/starburst composite systems APM 08279+5255 at z = 3.911 and SMM J02399-0136 at z = 2.8076. The line is exceptionally bright from both systems, with apparent (lensed) luminosities ~10^11 L_solar. For APM 08279, the [OIII] line flux can be modeled in a star formation paradigm, with the stellar radiation field dominated by stars with effective temperatures, Teff >36,000 K, similar to the starburst found in M82. The model implies ~35% of the total far-IR luminosity of the system is generated by the starburst, with the remainder arising from dust heated by the AGN. The 88 micron line can also be generated in the narrow line region of the AGN if gas densities are around a few 1000 cm-3. For SMM J02399 the [OIII] line likely arises from HII regions formed by hot (Teff >40,000 K) young stars in a massive starburst that dominates the far-IR luminosity of the system. The present work demonstrates the utility of the [OIII] line for characterizing starbursts and AGN within galaxies in the early Universe. These are the first detections of this astrophysically important line from galaxies beyond a redshift of 0.05.