• With the first direct detection of merging black holes in 2015, the era of gravitational wave (GW) astrophysics began. A complete picture of compact object mergers, however, requires the detection of an electromagnetic (EM) counterpart. We report ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray observations by Swift and the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) of the EM counterpart of the binary neutron star merger GW170817. The bright, rapidly fading ultraviolet emission indicates a high mass ($\approx0.03$ solar masses) wind-driven outflow with moderate electron fraction ($Y_{e}\approx0.27$). Combined with the X-ray limits, we favor an observer viewing angle of $\approx 30^{\circ}$ away from the orbital rotation axis, which avoids both obscuration from the heaviest elements in the orbital plane and a direct view of any ultra-relativistic, highly collimated ejecta (a gamma-ray burst afterglow).
  • Galaxies at high redshifts provide a valuable tool to study cosmic dawn, and therefore it is crucial to reliably identify these galaxies. Here, we present an unambiguous and first simultaneous detection of both the Lyman-alpha emission and the Lyman break from a z = 7.512+/- 0.004 galaxy, observed in the Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS). These spectra, taken with G102 grism on Hubble Space Telescope (HST), show a significant emission line detection (6 sigma) in multiple observational position angles (PA), with total integrated Ly{\alpha} line flux of 1.06+/- 0.12 e10-17erg s-1cm-2. The line flux is nearly a factor of four higher than the previous MOSFIRE spectroscopic observations of faint Ly{\alpha} emission at {\lambda} = 1.0347{\mu}m, yielding z = 7.5078+/- 0.0004. This is consistent with other recent observations implying that ground-based near-infrared spectroscopy underestimates total emission line fluxes, and if confirmed, can have strong implications for reionization studies that are based on ground-based Lyman-{\alpha} measurements. A 4-{\sigma} detection of the NV line in one PA also suggests a weak Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN), potentially making this source the highest-redshift AGN yet found. Thus, this observation from the Hubble Space Telescope clearly demonstrates the sensitivity of the FIGS survey, and the capability of grism spectroscopy to study the epoch of reionization.
  • The Advanced LIGO observatory recently reported the first direct detection of gravitational waves (GW) which triggered ALIGO on 2015 September 14. We report on observations taken with the Swift satellite two days after the trigger. No new X-ray, optical, UV or hard X-ray sources were detected in our observations, which were focussed on nearby galaxies in the GW error region and covered 4.7 square degrees (~2% of the probability in the rapidly-available GW error region; 0.3% of the probability from the final GW error region, which was produced several months after the trigger). We describe the rapid Swift response and automated analysis of the X-ray telescope and UV/Optical Telescope data, and note the importance to electromagnetic follow up of early notification of the progenitor details inferred from GW analysis.
  • We study the far-infrared properties of 498 Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs) at z=2.8, 3.1 and 4.5 in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South, using 250, 350 and 500 micron data from the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) and 870 micron data from the LABOCA ECDFS Submillimeter Survey (LESS). None of the 126, 280 or 92 LAEs at z=2.8, 3.1 and 4.5, respectively, are individually detected in the far-infrared data. We use stacking to probe the average emission to deeper flux limits, reaching $1\sigma$ depths of ~0.1 to 0.4 mJy. The LAEs are also undetected at $\ge3\sigma$ in the stacks, although a $2.5\sigma$ signal is observed at 870 micron for the z=2.8 sources. We consider a wide range of far-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs), including a M82 and an Sd galaxy template, to determine upper limits on the far-infrared luminosities and far-infrared-derived star-formation rates of the LAEs. These star-formation rates are then combined with those inferred from the Ly$\alpha$ and UV emission to determine lower limits on the LAEs Ly$\alpha$ escape fraction ($f_{\rm esc}($Ly$\alpha$)). For the Sd SED template, the inferred LAEs $f_{\rm esc}($Ly$\alpha$) are $\gtrsim30%$ ($1\sigma$) at z=2.8, 3.1 and 4.5, which are all significantly higher than the global $f_{\rm esc}($Ly$\alpha$) at these redshifts. Thus, if the LAEs $f_{\rm esc}($Ly$\alpha$) follows the global evolution then they have warmer far-infrared SEDs than the Sd galaxy template. The average and M82 SEDs produce lower limits on the LAE $f_{\rm esc}($Ly$\alpha$) of ~10 to 20% ($1\sigma$), all of which are slightly higher than the global evolution of $f_{\rm esc}($Ly$\alpha$) but consistent with it at the 2 to 3$\sigma$ level.
  • Using archival data from ATCA, WSRT, and the VLA, we have analyzed the HI emission of 22 tidal tail regions of the Mullan et al. sample of pairwise interacting galaxies. We have measured the column densities, line-of-sight velocity dispersions, and kinetic energy densities on ~kpc scales. We also constructed a tracer of the line-of-sight velocity gradient over ~10 kpc scales. We compared the distributions of these properties between regions that do and do not contain massive star cluster candidates (M_V < -8.5; ~10^4--10^6 M_(sun) as observed in HST WFPC2 VI data). In agreement with Maybhate et al., we find that a local, ~kpc-scale column density of log N_(HI) = 20.6 cm^(-2) is frequently required for detecting clustered star formation. This HI gas also tends to be turbulent, with line-of-sight velocity dispersions ~10--75 km/s, implying high kinetic energy densities (>46 erg pc^(-2)). Thus, high HI densities and pressures, partly determined by the tail dynamical age and other interaction characteristics, are connected to large-scale cluster formation in tidal tails overall. Lastly, we find that the high mechanical energy densities of the gas are likely not generally due to feedback from star formation. Rather, these properties are more likely to be a cause of star formation than a result.
  • Compact group galaxies often appear unaffected by their unusually dense environment. Closer examination can, however, reveal the subtle, cumulative effects of multiple galaxy interactions. Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 59 is an excellent example of this situation. We present a photometric study of this group in the optical (HST), infrared (Spitzer) and X-ray (Chandra) regimes aimed at characterizing the star formation and nuclear activity in its constituent galaxies and intra-group medium. We associate five dwarf galaxies with the group and update the velocity dispersion, leading to an increase in the dynamical mass of the group of up to a factor of 10 (to 2.8e13 Msun), and a subsequent revision of its evolutionary stage. Star formation is proceeding at a level consistent with the morphological types of the four main galaxies, of which two are star-forming and the other two quiescent. Unlike in some other compact groups, star-forming complexes across HCG 59 closely follow mass-radius scaling relations typical of nearby galaxies. In contrast, the ancient globular cluster populations in galaxies HCG 59A and B show intriguing irregularities, and two extragalactic HII regions are found just west of B. We age-date a faint stellar stream in the intra-group medium at ~1 Gyr to examine recent interactions. We detect a likely low-luminosity AGN in HCG 59A by its ~10e40 erg/s X-ray emission; the active nucleus rather than star formation can account for the UV+IR SED. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of galaxy evolution in dense environments.
  • We present Swift UV/Optical Telescope (UVOT) imaging of the galaxies M81 and Holmberg IX. We combine UVOT imaging in three near ultraviolet (NUV) filters (uvw2: 1928 {\AA}, uvm2: 2246 {\AA}, and uvw1: 2600 {\AA}) with ground based optical imaging from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to constrain the stellar populations of both galaxies. Our analysis consists of three different methods. First we use the NUV imaging to identify UV star forming knots and then perform SED modeling on the UV/optical photometry of these sources. Second, we measure surface brightness profiles of the disk of M81 in the NUV and optical. Last we use SED fitting of individual pixels to map the properties of the two galaxies. In agreement with earlier studies we find evidence for a burst in star formation in both galaxies starting ~200 Myr ago coincident with the suggested time of an M81-M82 interaction. In line with theories of its origin as a tidal dwarf we find that the luminosity weighted age of Holmberg IX is a few hundred million years. Both galaxies are best fit by a Milky Way dust extinction law with a prominent 2175 {\AA} bump. In addition, we describe a stacked median filter technique for modeling the diffuse background light within a galaxy, and a Markov chain method for cleaning segment maps generated by SExtractor.
  • We have searched for compact stellar structures within 17 tidal tails in 13 different interacting galaxies using F606W- and F814W- band images from the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The sample of tidal tails includes a diverse population of optical properties, merging galaxy mass ratios, HI content, and ages. Combining our tail sample with Knierman et al. (2003), we find evidence of star clusters formed in situ with Mv < -8.5 and V-I < 2.0 in 10 of 23 tidal tails; we are able to identify cluster candidates to Mv = -6.5 in the closest tails. Three tails offer clear examples of "beads on a string" star formation morphology in V-I color maps. Two tails present both tidal dwarf galaxy (TDG) candidates and cluster candidates. Statistical diagnostics indicate that clusters in tidal tails may be drawn from the same power-law luminosity functions (with logarithmic slopes ~ -2 - -2.5) found in quiescent spiral galaxies and the interiors of interacting systems. We find that the tail regions with the largest number of observable clusters are relatively young (< 250 Myr old) and bright (V < 24 mag arcsec^(-2)), probably attributed to the strong bursts of star formation in interacting systems soon after periapse. Otherwise, we find no statistical difference between cluster-rich and cluster-poor tails in terms of many observable characteristics, though this analysis suffers from complex, unresolved gas dynamics and projection effects.
  • The Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) is one of three instruments onboard the Swift observatory. The photometric calibration has been published, and this paper follows up with details on other aspects of the calibration including a measurement of the point spread function with an assessment of the orbital variation and the effect on photometry. A correction for large scale variations in sensitivity over the field of view is described, as well as a model of the coincidence loss which is used to assess the coincidence correction in extended regions. We have provided a correction for the detector distortion and measured the resulting internal astrometric accuracy of the UVOT, also giving the absolute accuracy with respect to the International Celestial Reference System. We have compiled statistics on the background count rates, and discuss the sources of the background, including instrumental scattered light. In each case we describe any impact on UVOT measurements, whether any correction is applied in the standard pipeline data processing or whether further steps are recommended.
  • We discovered a sample of 250 Ly-Alpha emitting (LAE) galaxies at z=2.1 in an ultra-deep 3727 A narrow-band MUSYC image of the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South. LAEs were selected to have rest-frame equivalent widths (EW) > 20 A and emission line fluxes > 2.0 x 10^(-17)erg /cm^2/s, after carefully subtracting the continuum contributions from narrow band photometry. The median flux of our sample is 4.2 x 10^(-17)erg/cm^2/s, corresponding to a median Lya luminosity = 1.3 x 10^(42) erg/s at z=2.1. At this flux our sample is > 90% complete. Approximately 4% of the original NB-selected candidates were detected in X-rays by Chandra, and 7% were detected in the rest-frame far-UV by GALEX. At luminosity>1.3 x 10^42 erg/s, the equivalent width distribution is unbiased and is represented by an exponential with scale-length of 83+/-10 A. Above this same luminosity threshold, we find a number density of 1.5+/-0.5 x 10^-3 Mpc^-3. Neither the number density of LAEs nor the scale-length of their EW distribution show significant evolution from z=3 to z=2. We used the rest frame UV luminosity to estimate a median star formation rate of 4 M_(sun) /yr. The median rest frame UV slope, parametrized by B-R, is that typical of dust-free, 0.5-1 Gyr old or moderately dusty, 300-500 Myr old populations. Approximately 40% of the sample occupies the z~2 star-forming galaxy locus in the UVR two color diagram. Clustering analysis reveals that LAEs at z=2.1 have r_0=4.8+/-0.9 Mpc and a bias factor b=1.8+/-0.3. This implies that z=2.1 LAEs reside in dark matter halos with median masses Log(M/M_(sun))=11.5^(+0.4)_(-0.5), which are among of the lowest-mass halos yet probed at this redshift. We used the Sheth-Tormen conditional mass function to study the descendants of these LAEs and found that their typical present-day descendants are local galaxies with L* properties, like the Milky Way.
  • Deep Swift UV/Optical Telescope (UVOT) imaging of the Chandra Deep Field South is used to measure galaxy number counts in three near ultraviolet (NUV) filters (uvw2: 1928 A, uvm2: 2246 A, uvw1: 2600 A) and the u band (3645 A). UVOT observations cover the break in the slope of the NUV number counts with greater precision than the number counts by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), spanning a range from 21 < m_AB < 25. Number counts models confirm earlier investigations in favoring models with an evolving galaxy luminosity function.
  • We present a rest-frame ultraviolet analysis of ~120 z~3.1 Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs) in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDF-S). Using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images taken as part of the Galaxy Evolution From Morphology and SEDS (GEMS) survey, Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS), and Hubble Ultradeep Field (HUDF) surveys, we analyze the sizes of LAEs, as well as the spatial distribution of their components, which are defined as distinct clumps of UV-continuum emission. We set an upper limit of ~1 kpc (~0.1") on the rms offset between the centroids of the continuum and Lyman-alpha emission. The star formation rates of LAE components inferred from the rest-frame ultraviolet continuum range from ~0.1 M_{sun}/yr to ~5$ M_{sun}/yr. A subsample of LAEs with coverage in multiple surveys (at different imaging depths) suggests that one needs a signal-to-noise ratio, S/N>~30, in order to make a robust estimate of the half-light radius of an LAE system. The majority of LAEs have observed half-light radii <~2 kpc, and LAE components typically have observed half-light radii <~1.5 kpc (<~ 0.2"). Although only ~50% of the detected LAE components are resolved at GOODS depth, the brightest (V<~26.3) are all resolved in both GOODS and GEMS. Since we find little evidence for a correlation between the rest-UV sizes and magnitudes of LAEs, the majority should be resolved in a deeper survey at the ~0.05" angular resolution of HST. Most of the multi-component LAEs identified in shallow frames become connected in deeper images, suggesting that the majority of the rest-UV "clumps" are individual star-forming regions within a single system.
  • We have used V- and I- band images from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to identify compact stellar clusters within the tidal tails of twelve different interacting galaxies. The seventeen tails within our sample span a physical parameter space of HI/stellar masses, tail pressure and density through their diversity of tail lengths, optical brightnesses, mass ratios, HI column densities, stage on the Toomre sequence, and tail kinematics. Our preliminary findings in this study indicate that star cluster demographics of the tidal tail environment are compatible with the current understanding of star cluster formation in quiescent systems, possibly only needing changes in certain parameters or normalization of the Schechter cluster initial mass function (CIMF) to replicate what we observe in color-magnitude diagrams and a brightest absolute magnitude -- log N plot.
  • We present results of a search for emission-line galaxies in the Southern Fields of the Hubble Space Telescope PEARS (Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically) grism survey. The PEARS South Fields consist of five ACS pointings (including the Hubble Ultra Deep Field) with the G800L grism for a total of 120 orbits, revealing thousands of faint object spectra in the GOODS-South region of the sky. Emission-line galaxies (ELGs) are one subset of objects that are prevalent among the grism spectra. Using a 2-dimensional detection and extraction procedure, we find 320 emission lines orginating from 226 galaxy "knots'' within 192 individual galaxies. Line identification results in 118 new grism-spectroscopic redshifts for galaxies in the GOODS-South Field. We measure emission line fluxes using standard Gaussian fitting techniques. At the resolution of the grism data, the H-beta and [OIII] doublet are blended. However, by fitting two Gaussian components to the H-beta and [OIII] features, we find that many of the PEARS ELGs have high [OIII]/H-beta ratios compared to other galaxy samples of comparable luminosities. The star-formation rates (SFRs) of the ELGs are presented, as well as a sample of distinct giant star-forming regions at z~0.1-0.5 across individual galaxies. We find that the radial distances of these HII regions in general reside near the galaxies' optical continuum half-light radii, similar to those of giant HII regions in local galaxies.
  • We present the earliest ever ultraviolet spectrum of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) as observed with the Swift-UVOT. The GRB 081203A spectrum was observed for 50 seconds with the UV grism starting 251 seconds after the Swift-BAT trigger when the GRB was of u ~13.4 mag and still rising to its peak optical brightness. The UV grism spectrum shows a damped Ly-alpha line, Ly-beta, and the Lyman continuum break at a redshift z = 2.05 +/- 0.01. A model fit to the Lyman absorption implies log N(HI) = 22.0 +/- 0.2 cm-2, which is typical for GRB host galaxies with damped Ly-alpha absorbers. This observation of GRB 081203A demonstrates that for GRBs brighter than v ~14 mag and with 0.5 < z < 3.5 the UVOT will be able to provide redshifts, and probe for damped Ly-alpha absorbers within 4-6 minutes from the time of the Swift-BAT trigger.
  • We present the first Swift Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow catalog. The catalog contains data from over 64,000 independent UVOT image observations of 229 GRBs first detected by Swift, the High Energy Transient Explorer 2 (HETE2), the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), and the Interplanetary Network (IPN). The catalog covers GRBs occurring during the period from 2005 Jan 17 to 2007 Jun 16 and includes ~86% of the bursts detected by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). The catalog provides detailed burst positional, temporal, and photometric information extracted from each of the UVOT images. Positions for bursts detected at the 3-sigma-level are provided with a nominal accuracy, relative to the USNO-B1 catalog, of ~0.25 arcseconds. Photometry for each burst is given in three UV bands, three optical bands, and a 'white' or open filter. Upper limits for magnitudes are reported for sources detected below 3-sigma. General properties of the burst sample and light curves, including the filter-dependent temporal slopes, are also provided. The majority of the UVOT light curves, for bursts detected at the 3-sigma-level, can be fit by a single power-law, with a median temporal slope (alpha) of 0.96, beginning several hundred seconds after the burst trigger and ending at ~1x10^5 s. The median UVOT v-band (~5500 Angstroms) magnitude at 2000 s for a sample of "well" detected bursts is 18.02. The UVOT flux interpolated to 2000 s after the burst, shows relatively strong correlations with both the prompt Swift BAT fluence, and the Swift X-ray flux at 11 hours after the trigger.
  • We present the photometric calibration of the Swift UltraViolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) which includes: optimum photometric and background apertures, effective area curves, colour transformations, conversion factors for count rates to flux, and the photometric zero points (which are accurate to better than 4 per cent) for each of the seven UVOT broadband filters. The calibration was performed with observations of standard stars and standard star fields that represent a wide range of spectral star types. The calibration results include the position dependent uniformity, and instrument response over the 1600-8000A operational range. Because the UVOT is a photon counting instrument, we also discuss the effect of coincidence loss on the calibration results. We provide practical guidelines for using the calibration in UVOT data analysis. The results presented here supersede previous calibration results.
  • We describe the results of an extremely deep, 0.28 deg^2 survey for z = 3.1 Ly-alpha emission-line galaxies in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South. By using a narrow-band 5000 Anstrom filter and complementary broadband photometry from the MUSYC survey, we identify a statistically complete sample of 162 galaxies with monochromatic fluxes brighter than 1.5 x 10^-17 ergs cm^-2 s^-1 and observers frame equivalent widths greater than 80 Angstroms. We show that the equivalent width distribution of these objects follows an exponential with a rest-frame scale length of w_0 = 76 +/- 10 Angstroms. In addition, we show that in the emission line, the luminosity function of Ly-alpha galaxies has a faint-end power-law slope of alpha = -1.49 +/- 0.4, a bright-end cutoff of log L^* = 42.64 +/- 0.2, and a space density above our detection thresholds of 1.46 +/- 0.12 x 10^-3 h70^3 galaxies Mpc^-3. Finally, by comparing the emission-line and continuum properties of the LAEs, we show that the star-formation rates derived from Ly-alpha are ~3 times lower than those inferred from the rest-frame UV continuum. We use this offset to deduce the existence of a small amount of internal extinction within the host galaxies. This extinction, coupled with the lack of extremely-high equivalent width emitters, argues that these galaxies are not primordial Pop III objects, though they are young and relatively chemically unevolved.
  • Swift discovered the high redshift (z=6.29) GRB050904 with the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and began observing with its narrow field instruments 161 s after the burst onset. This gamma-ray burst is the most distant cosmic explosion ever observed. Because of its high redshift, the X-ray Telescope (XRT) and BAT simultaneous observations provide 4 orders of magnitude of spectral coverage (0.2-150 keV; 1.4-1090 keV in the source rest frame) at a very early source-frame time (22 s). GRB050904 was a long, multi-peaked, bright GRB with strong variability during its entire evolution. The light curve observed by the XRT is characterized by the presence of a long flaring activity lasting up to 1-2 hours after the burst onset in the burst rest frame, with no evidence of a smooth power-law decay following the prompt emission as seen in other GRBs. However, the BAT tail extrapolated to the XRT band joins the XRT early light curve and the overall behavior resembles that of a very long GRB prompt. The spectral energy distribution softens with time, with the photon index decreasing from -1.2 during the BAT observation to -1.9 at the end of the XRT observation. The dips of the late X-ray flares may be consistent with an underlying X-ray emission arising from the forward shock and with the properties of the optical afterglow reported by Tagliaferri et al. (2005b). We interpret the BAT and XRT data as a single continuous observation of the prompt emission from a very long GRB. The peculiarities observed in GRB050904 could be due to its origin within one of the first star-forming regions in the Universe; very low metallicities of the progenitor at these epochs may provide an explanation.
  • We present ultraviolet, optical, and infrared photometry of the afterglow of the X-ray flash XRF 050416A taken between approximately 100 seconds and 36 days after the burst. We find an intrinsic spectral slope between 1930 and 22,200 Angstrom of beta = -1.14 +/- 0.20 and a decay rate of alpha = -0.86 +/- 0.15. There is no evidence for a change in the decay rate between approximately 0.7 and 4.7 days after the burst. Our data implies that there is no spectral break between the optical and X-ray bands between 0.7 and 4.7 days after the burst, and is consistent with the cooling break being redward of the K_s band (22,200 Angstrom) at 0.7 days. The combined ultraviolet/optical/infrared spectral energy distribution shows no evidence for a significant amount of extinction in the host galaxy along the line of sight to XRF 050416A. Our data suggest that the extragalactic extinction along the line of sight to the burst is only approximately A_V = 0.2 mag, which is significantly less than the extinction expected from the hydrogen column density inferred from $X$-ray observations of XRF 050416A assuming a dust-to-gas ratio similar to what is found for the Milky Way. The observed extinction, however, is consistent with the dust-to-gas ratio seen in the Small Magellanic Cloud. We suggest that XRF 050416A may have a two-component jet similar to what has been proposed for GRB 030329. If this is the case the lack of an observed jet break between 0.7 and 42 days is an illusion due to emission from the wide jet dominating the afterglow after approximately 1.5 days.
  • Very early observations with the Swift satellite of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows reveal that the optical component is not detected in a large number of cases. This is in contrast to the bright optical flashes previously discovered in some GRBs (e.g. GRB 990123 and GRB 021211). Comparisons of the X-ray afterglow flux to the optical afterglow flux and prompt gamma-ray fluence is used to quantify the seemingly deficient optical, and in some cases X-ray, light at these early epochs. This comparison reveals that some of these bursts appear to have higher than normal gamma-ray efficiencies. We discuss possible mechanisms and their feasibility for explaining the apparent lack of early optical emission. The mechanisms considered include: foreground extinction, circumburst absorption, Ly-alpha blanketing and absorption due to high redshift, low density environments, rapid temporal decay, and intrinsic weakness of the reverse shock. Of these, foreground extinction, circumburst absorption, and high redshift provide the best explanations for most of the non-detections in our sample. There is tentative evidence of suppression of the strong reverse shock emission. This could be because of a Poynting-flux-dominated flow or a pure non-relativistic hydrodynamical reverse shock.
  • Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of high energy photons that can last from about 10 milliseconds to 10 minutes. Their origin and nature have puzzled the scientific community for about 25 years until 1997, when the first X-ray afterglows of long (> 2 s duration) bursts were detected and the first optical and radio counterparts were found. These measurements established that long GRBs are typically at high redshift (z 1.6) and are in sub-luminous star-forming host galaxies. They are likely produced in core-collapse explosions of a class of massive stars that give rise to highly relativistic jets (collapsar model). Internal inhomogeneities in the velocity field of the relativistic expanding flow lead to collisions between fast moving and slow moving fluid shells and to the formation of internal shock waves. These shocks are believed to produce the observed prompt emission in the form of irregularly shaped and spaced pulses of gamma-rays, each pulse corresponding to a distinct internal collision. The expansion of the jet outward into the circumstellar medium is believed to give rise to ``external'' shocks, responsible for producing the smoothly fading afterglow emission seen in the X-ray, optical and radio bands. Here we report on the gamma-ray and x-ray observation of the most distant gamma-ray burst ever observed: its redshift of 6.29 translates to a distance of 13 billion light-years from Earth, corresponding to a time when the Universe was just 700 million to 750 million years old. The discovery of a gamma-ray burst at such a large redshift implies the presence of massive stars only 700 million years after the Big Bang. The very high redshift bursts represent a good way to study the re-ionization era soon after the Universe came out of the Dark Ages.
  • We present Swift-UVOT data on the optical afterglow of the X-ray flash of 2005 April 6 (XRF 050406) from 88s to \sim 10^5s after the initial prompt gamma-ray emission. Our observations in the V, B and U bands are the earliest that have been taken of an XRF optical counterpart. Combining the early -time optical temporal and spectral properties with \gamma- and simultaneous X-ray data taken with the BAT and XRT telescopes on-board Swift, we are able to constrain possible origins of the XRF. The prompt emission had a FRED profile (fast-rise, exponential decay) with a duration of T_90 = 5.7\pm 0.2s, putting it at the short end of the long-burst duration distribution. The absence of photoelectric absorption red-ward of 4000 \AA in the UV/optical spectrum provides a firm upper limit of z\leq 3.1 on the redshift, thus excluding a high redshift as the sole reason for the soft spectrum. The optical light curve is consistent with a power-law decay with slope alpha = -0.75\pm 0.26 (F_{\nu}\propto t^{\alpha}), and a maximum occurring in the first 200s after the initial gamma-ray emission. The softness of the prompt emission is well described by an off-axis structured jet model, which is able to account for the early peak flux and shallow decay observed in the optical and X-ray bands.
  • (Abridged.) We present F435W (B), F606W (Broad V), and F814W (Broad I) coronagraphic images of the debris disk around Beta Pictoris obtained with HST's Advanced Camera for Surveys. We confirm that the previously reported warp in the inner disk is a distinct secondary disk inclined by ~5 deg from the main disk. The main disk's northeast extension is linear from 80 to 250 AU, but the southwest extension is distinctly bowed with an amplitude of ~1 AU over the same region. Both extensions of the secondary disk appear linear, but not collinear, from 80 to 150 AU. Within ~120 AU of the star, the main disk is ~50% thinner than previously reported. The surface-brightness profiles along the spine of the main disk are fitted with four distinct radial power laws between 40 and 250 AU, while those of the secondary disk between 80 and 150 AU are fitted with single power laws. These discrepancies suggest that the two disks have different grain compositions or size distributions. The F606W/F435W and F814W/F435W flux ratios of the composite disk are nonuniform and asymmetric about both projected axes of the disk. Within ~120 AU, the m_F435W-m_F606W and m_F435W-m_F814W colors along the spine of the main disk are ~10% and ~20% redder, respectively, than those of Beta Pic. These colors increasingly redden beyond ~120 AU, becoming 25% and 40% redder, respectively, than the star at 250 AU. We compare the observed red colors within ~120 AU with the simulated colors of non-icy grains having a radial number density ~r^-3 and different compositions, porosities, and minimum grain sizes. The observed colors are consistent with those of compact or moderately porous grains of astronomical silicate and/or graphite with sizes >0.15-0.20 um, but the colors are inconsistent with the blue colors expected from grains with porosities >90%.
  • A five square arcminute region around the luminous radio-loud quasar SDSS J0836+0054 (z=5.8) hosts a wealth of associated galaxies, characterized by very red (1.3 < i_775 - z_{850} < 2.0) color. The surface density of these z~5.8 candidates is approximately six times higher than the number expected from deep ACS fields. This is one of the highest galaxy overdensities at high redshifts, which may develop into a group or cluster. We also find evidence for a substructure associated with one of the candidates. It has two very faint companion objects within two arcseconds, which are likely to merge. The finding supports the results of a recent simulation that luminous quasars at high redshifts lie on the most prominent dark-matter filaments and are surrounded by many fainter galaxies. The quasar activity from these regions may signal the buildup of a massive system.