• We present new observations of the binary neutron star merger GW170817 at $\Delta t\approx 220-260$ days post-merger, at radio (Karl G.~Jansky Very Large Array; VLA), X-ray ({\it Chandra X-ray Observatory}) and optical ({\it Hubble Space Telescope}; HST) wavelengths. These observations provide the first evidence for a turnover in the X-ray light curve, mirroring a decline in the radio emission at $\gtrsim5\sigma$ significance. The radio to X-ray spectral energy distribution exhibits no evolution into the declining phase. Our full multi-wavelength dataset is consistent with the predicted behavior of our previously-published models of a structured jet expanding into a low density circumbinary medium. If future observations continue to track our predictions, we expect the radio and X-ray emission to remain detectable until $\sim 1000$ days post-merger.
  • The recent discovery of the electromagnetic counterpart of the gravitational wave source GW170817, has demonstrated the huge informative power of multi-messenger observations. During the next decade the nascent field of multi-messenger astronomy will mature significantly. Around 2030, third generation gravitational wave detectors will be roughly ten times more sensitive than the current ones. At the same time, neutrino detectors currently upgrading to multi km^3 telescopes, will include a 10 km^3 facility in the Southern hemisphere that is expected to be operational around 2030. In this review, we describe the most promising high frequency gravitational wave and neutrino sources that will be detected in the next two decades. In this context, we show the important role of the Transient High Energy Sky and Early Universe Surveyor (THESEUS), a mission concept proposed to ESA by a large international collaboration in response to the call for the Cosmic Vision Programme M5 missions. THESEUS aims at providing a substantial advancement in early Universe science as well as playing a fundamental role in multi-messenger and time-domain astrophysics, operating in strong synergy with future gravitational wave and neutrino detectors as well as major ground- and space-based telescopes. This review is an extension of the THESEUS white paper (Amati et al. 2017), also in light of the discovery of GW170817/GRB170817A that was announced on October 16th, 2017.
  • L. Amati, P. O'Brien, D. Goetz, E. Bozzo, C. Tenzer, F. Frontera, G. Ghirlanda, C. Labanti, J. P. Osborne, G. Stratta, N. Tanvir, R. Willingale, P. Attina, R. Campana, A.J. Castro-Tirado, C. Contini, F. Fuschino, A. Gomboc, R. Hudec, P. Orleanski, E. Renotte, T. Rodic, Z. Bagoly, A. Blain, P. Callanan, S. Covino, A. Ferrara, E. Le Floch, M. Marisaldi, S. Mereghetti, P. Rosati, A. Vacchi, P. D'Avanzo, P. Giommi, A. Gomboc, S. Piranomonte, L. Piro, V. Reglero, A. Rossi, A. Santangelo, R. Salvaterra, G. Tagliaferri, S. Vergani, S. Vinciguerra, M. Briggs, E. Campolongo, R. Ciolfi, V. Connaughton, B. Cordier, B. Morelli, M. Orlandini, C. Adami, A. Argan, J.-L. Atteia, N. Auricchio, L. Balazs, G. Baldazzi, S. Basa, R. Basak, P. Bellutti, M. G. Bernardini, G. Bertuccio, J. Braga, M. Branchesi, S. Brandt, E. Brocato, C. Budtz-Jorgensen, A. Bulgarelli, L. Burderi, J. Camp, S. Capozziello, J. Caruana, P. Casella, B. Cenko, P. Chardonnet, B. Ciardi, S. Colafrancesco, M. G. Dainotti, V. D'Elia, D. De Martino, M. De Pasquale, E. Del Monte, M. Della Valle, A. Drago, Y. Evangelista, M. Feroci, F. Finelli, M. Fiorini, J. Fynbo, A. Gal-Yam, B. Gendre, G. Ghisellini, A. Grado, C. Guidorzi, M. Hafizi, L. Hanlon, J. Hjorth, L. Izzo, L. Kiss, P. Kumar, I. Kuvvetli, M. Lavagna, T. Li, F. Longo, M. Lyutikov, U. Maio, E. Maiorano, P. Malcovati, D. Malesani, R. Margutti, A. Martin-Carrillo, N. Masetti, S. McBreen, R. Mignani, G. Morgante, C. Mundell, H. U. Nargaard-Nielsen, L. Nicastro, E. Palazzi, S. Paltani, F. Panessa, G. Pareschi, A. Pe'er, A. V. Penacchioni, E. Pian, E. Piedipalumbo, T. Piran, G. Rauw, M. Razzano, A. Read, L. Rezzolla, P. Romano, R. Ruffini, S. Savaglio, V. Sguera, P. Schady, W. Skidmore, L. Song, E. Stanway, R. Starling, M. Topinka, E. Troja, M. van Putten, E. Vanzella, S. Vercellone, C. Wilson-Hodge, D. Yonetoku, G. Zampa, N. Zampa, B. Zhang, B. B. Zhang, S. Zhang, S.-N. Zhang, A. Antonelli, F. Bianco, S. Boci, M. Boer, M. T. Botticella, O. Boulade, C. Butler, S. Campana, F. Capitanio, A. Celotti, Y. Chen, M. Colpi, A. Comastri, J.-G. Cuby, M. Dadina, A. De Luca, Y.-W. Dong, S. Ettori, P. Gandhi, E. Geza, J. Greiner, S. Guiriec, J. Harms, M. Hernanz, A. Hornstrup, I. Hutchinson, G. Israel, P. Jonker, Y. Kaneko, N. Kawai, K. Wiersema, S. Korpela, V. Lebrun, F. Lu, A. MacFadyen, G. Malaguti, L. Maraschi, A. Melandri, M. Modjaz, D. Morris, N. Omodei, A. Paizis, P. Pata, V. Petrosian, A. Rachevski, J. Rhoads, F. Ryde, L. Sabau-Graziati, N. Shigehiro, M. Sims, J. Soomin, D. Szecsi, Y. Urata, M. Uslenghi, L. Valenziano, G. Vianello, S. Vojtech, D. Watson, J. Zicha
    March 27, 2018 astro-ph.IM, astro-ph.HE
    THESEUS is a space mission concept aimed at exploiting Gamma-Ray Bursts for investigating the early Universe and at providing a substantial advancement of multi-messenger and time-domain astrophysics. These goals will be achieved through a unique combination of instruments allowing GRB and X-ray transient detection over a broad field of view (more than 1sr) with 0.5-1 arcmin localization, an energy band extending from several MeV down to 0.3 keV and high sensitivity to transient sources in the soft X-ray domain, as well as on-board prompt (few minutes) follow-up with a 0.7 m class IR telescope with both imaging and spectroscopic capabilities. THESEUS will be perfectly suited for addressing the main open issues in cosmology such as, e.g., star formation rate and metallicity evolution of the inter-stellar and intra-galactic medium up to redshift $\sim$10, signatures of Pop III stars, sources and physics of re-ionization, and the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function. In addition, it will provide unprecedented capability to monitor the X-ray variable sky, thus detecting, localizing, and identifying the electromagnetic counterparts to sources of gravitational radiation, which may be routinely detected in the late '20s / early '30s by next generation facilities like aLIGO/ aVirgo, eLISA, KAGRA, and Einstein Telescope. THESEUS will also provide powerful synergies with the next generation of multi-wavelength observatories (e.g., LSST, ELT, SKA, CTA, ATHENA).
  • The energy source powering the extreme optical luminosity of hydrogen-stripped Superluminous Supernovae (SLSNe-I) is not known, but recent studies have highlighted the case for a central engine. Radio and/or X-ray observations are best placed to track the fastest ejecta and probe the presence of outflows from a central engine. We compile all the published radio observations of SLSNe-I to date and present three new observations of two new SLSNe-I. None were detected. Through modeling the radio emission, we constrain the sub-parsec environments and possible outflows in SLSNe-I. In this sample we rule out on-axis collimated relativistic jets of the kind detected in Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). We constrain off-axis jets with opening angles of 5\arcdeg\ (30\arcdeg) to energies of $\rm{E_k<4\times10^{50}\,erg}$ ($\rm{E_k<10^{50}\,erg}$) in environments shaped by progenitors with mass-loss rates of $\dot{M}<10^{-4}\,M_{\odot}\,{\rm yr}^{-1}$ ($\dot{M}<10^{-5}\,M_{\odot}\,{\rm yr}^{-1}$) for all off-axis angles, assuming fiducial values $\epsilon_e=0.1$ and $\epsilon_B=0.01$. The deepest limits rule out emission of the kind seen in faint un-collimated GRBs (with the exception of GRB\,060218), and from relativistic supernovae. Finally, for the closest SLSN-I SN 2017egm we constrained the energy of an uncollimated non-relativistic outflow like those observed in normal SNe to $E_{\rm k}\lesssim10^{48}$ erg.
  • We report deep Chandra, HST and VLA observations of the binary neutron star event GW170817 at $t<160$ d after merger. These observations show that GW170817 has been steadily brightening with time and might have now reached its peak, and constrain the emission process as non-thermal synchrotron emission where the cooling frequency $\nu_c$ is above the X-ray band and the synchrotron frequency $\nu_m$ is below the radio band. The very simple power-law spectrum extending for eight orders of magnitude in frequency enables the most precise measurement of the index $p$ of the distribution of non-thermal relativistic electrons $N(\gamma)\propto \gamma^{-p}$ accelerated by a shock launched by a NS-NS merger to date. We find $p=2.17\pm0.01$, which indicates that radiation from ejecta with $\Gamma\sim3-10$ dominates the observed emission. While constraining the nature of the emission process, these observations do \emph{not} constrain the nature of the relativistic ejecta. We employ simulations of explosive outflows launched in NS ejecta clouds to show that the spectral and temporal evolution of the non-thermal emission from GW170817 is consistent with both emission from radially stratified quasi-spherical ejecta traveling at mildly relativistic speeds, \emph{and} emission from off-axis collimated ejecta characterized by a narrow cone of ultra-relativistic material with slower wings extending to larger angles. In the latter scenario, GW170817 harbored a normal SGRB directed away from our line of sight. Observations at $t\le 200$ days are unlikely to settle the debate as in both scenarios the observed emission is effectively dominated by radiation from mildly relativistic material.
  • The luminosity distance measurement of GW170817 derived from GW analysis in Abbott et al. 2017 (here, A17:H0) is highly correlated with the measured inclination of the NS-NS system. To improve the precision of the distance measurement, we attempt to constrain the inclination by modeling the broad-band X-ray-to-radio emission from GW170817, which is dominated by the interaction of the jet with the environment. We update our previous analysis and we consider the radio and X-ray data obtained at $t<40$ days since merger. We find that the afterglow emission from GW170817 is consistent with an off-axis relativistic jet with energy $10^{48}\,\rm{erg}<E_{k}\le 3\times 10^{50} \,\rm{erg}$ propagating into an environment with density $n\sim10^{-2}-10^{-4} \,\rm{cm^{-3}}$, with preference for wider jets (opening angle $\theta_j=15$ deg). For these jets, our modeling indicates an off-axis angle $\theta_{\rm obs}\sim25-50$ deg. We combine our constraints on $\theta_{\rm obs}$ with the joint distance-inclination constraint from LIGO. Using the same $\sim 170$ km/sec peculiar velocity uncertainty assumed in A17:H0 but with an inclination constraint from the afterglow data, we get a value of $H_0=$$74.0 \pm \frac{11.5}{7.5}$ $\mbox{km/s/Mpc}$, which is higher than the value of $H_0=$$70.0 \pm \frac{12.0}{8.0}$ $\mbox{km/s/Mpc}$ found in A17:H0. Further, using a more realistic peculiar velocity uncertainty of 250 km/sec derived from previous work, we find $H_0=$$75.5 \pm \frac{11.6}{9.6}$ km/s/Mpc for H0 from this system. We note that this is in modestly better agreement with the local distance ladder than the Planck CMB, though a significant such discrimination will require $\sim 50$ such events. Future measurements at $t>100$ days of the X-ray and radio emission will lead to tighter constraints.
  • We report the discovery of rising X-ray emission from the binary neutron star (BNS) merger event GW170817. This is the first detection of X-ray emission from a gravitational-wave source. Observations acquired with the Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) at t~2.3 days post merger reveal no significant emission, with L_x<=3.2x10^38 erg/s (isotropic-equivalent). Continued monitoring revealed the presence of an X-ray source that brightened with time, reaching L_x\sim 9x10^39 erg/s at ~15.1 days post merger. We interpret these findings in the context of isotropic and collimated relativistic outflows (both on- and off-axis). We find that the broad-band X-ray to radio observations are consistent with emission from a relativistic jet with kinetic energy E_k~10^49-10^50 erg, viewed off-axis with theta_obs~ 20-40 deg. Our models favor a circumbinary density n~ 0.0001-0.01 cm-3, depending on the value of the microphysical parameter epsilon_B=10^{-4}-10^{-2}. A central-engine origin of the X-ray emission is unlikely. Future X-ray observations at $t\gtrsim 100$ days, when the target will be observable again with the CXO, will provide additional constraints to solve the model degeneracies and test our predictions. Our inferences on theta_obs are testable with gravitational wave information on GW170817 from Advanced LIGO/Virgo on the binary inclination.
  • We present Very Large Array (VLA) and Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array ALMA radio observations of GW\,170817, the first Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)/Virgo gravitational wave (GW) event from a binary neutron star merger and the first GW event with an electromagnetic (EM) counterpart. Our data include the first observations following the discovery of the optical transient at both the centimeter ($13.7$ hours post merger) and millimeter ($2.41$ days post merger) bands. We detect faint emission at 6 GHz at 19.47 and 39.23 days after the merger, but not in an earlier observation at 2.46 d. We do not detect cm/mm emission at the position of the optical counterpart at frequencies of 10-97.5 GHz at times ranging from 0.6 to 30 days post merger, ruling out an on-axis short gamma-ray burst (SGRB) for energies $\gtrsim 10^{48}$ erg. For fiducial SGRB parameters, our limits require an observer viewer angle of $\gtrsim 20^{\circ}$. The radio and X-ray data can be jointly explained as the afterglow emission from an SGRB with a jet energy of $\sim 10^{49}-10^{50}$ erg that exploded in a uniform density environment with $n\sim 10^{-4}-10^{-2}$ cm$^{-3}$, viewed at an angle of $\sim 20^{\circ}-40^{\circ}$ from the jet axis. Using the results of our light curve and spectral modeling, in conjunction with the inference of the circumbinary density, we predict the emergence of late-time radio emission from the deceleration of the kilonova (KN) ejecta on a timescale of $\sim 5-10$ years that will remain detectable for decades with next-generation radio facilities, making GW\,170817 a compelling target for long-term radio monitoring.
  • We present a comprehensive temporal and spectral analysis of the long Swift GRB 120327A afterglow data to investigate the possible causes of the observed early time colour variations. We collected data from various instruments/telescopes in different bands (X-rays, ultra- violet, optical and near-infrared) and determined the shapes of the afterglow early-time light curves. We studied the overall temporal behaviour and the spectral energy distributions from early to late times. The ultra-violet, optical, and near-infrared light curves can be modelled with a single power-law component between 200 and 2e4 s after the burst event. The X-ray light curve shows a canonical steep-shallow-steep behaviour, typical of long gamma-ray bursts. At early times a colour variation is observed in the ultra-violet/optical bands, while at very late times a hint of a re-brightening is visible. The observed early time colour change can be explained as a variation in the intrinsic optical spectral index, rather than an evolution of the optical extinction.
  • We present multi-wavelength observations and modeling of the exceptionally bright long $\gamma$-ray burst GRB 160625B. The optical and X-ray data are well-fit by synchrotron emission from a collimated blastwave with an opening angle of $\theta_j\approx 3.6^\circ$ and kinetic energy of $E_K\approx 2\times10^{51}$ erg, propagating into a low density ($n\approx 5\times10^{-5}$ cm$^{-3}$) medium with a uniform profile. The forward shock is sub-dominant in the radio band; instead, the radio emission is dominated by two additional components. The first component is consistent with emission from a reverse shock, indicating an initial Lorentz factor of $\Gamma_0\gtrsim 100$ and an ejecta magnetization of $R_B\approx 1-100$. The second component exhibits peculiar spectral and temporal evolution and is most likely the result of scattering of the radio emission by the turbulent Milky Way interstellar medium (ISM). Such scattering is expected in any sufficiently compact extragalactic source and has been seen in GRBs before, but the large amplitude and long duration of the variability seen here are qualitatively more similar to extreme scattering events previously observed in quasars, rather than normal interstellar scintillation effects. High-cadence, broadband radio observations of future GRBs are needed to fully characterize such effects, which can sensitively probe the properties of the ISM and must be taken into account before variability intrinsic to the GRB can be interpreted correctly.
  • We present a catalog of early-time (~10^2-10^4s) photometry and polarimetry of all Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) optical afterglows observed with RINGO2 imaging polarimeter on the Liverpool Telescope. For the 19 optical afterglows observed, the following 9 were bright enough to perform photometry and attempt polarimetry: GRB 100805A, GRB 101112A, GRB 110205A, GRB 110726A, GRB 120119A, GRB 120308A, GRB 120311A, GRB 120326A and GRB 120327A. We present multi-wavelength light curves for these 9 GRBs, together with estimates of their optical polarization degrees and/or limits. We carry out a thorough investigation of detection probabilities, instrumental properties and systematics. Using two independent methods, we confirm previous reports of significant polarization in GRB 110205A and 120308A, and report new detection of $P=6^{+3}_{-2}\%$ in GRB101112A. We discuss the results for the sample in the context of the reverse and forward shock afterglow scenario, and show that GRBs with detectable optical polarization at early time have clearly identifiable signatures of reverse-shock emission in their optical light curves. This supports the idea that GRB ejecta contain large-scale magnetic fields and highlights the importance of rapid-response polarimetry.
  • We present the results from a sensitive X-ray survey of 26 nearby hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSNe-I) with Swift, Chandra and XMM. This dataset constrains the SLSN evolution from a few days until ~2000 days after explosion, reaching a luminosity L_x~10^40 erg/s and revealing the presence of significant X-ray emission at the location of PTF12dam. No SLSN-I is detected above L_x~10^41 erg/s, suggesting that the luminous X-ray emission L_x~10^45 erg/s associated with SCP60F6 is not common among SLSNe-I. We constrain the presence of off-axis GRB jets, ionization breakouts from magnetar central engines and the density in the sub-pc environments of SLSNe-I through Inverse Compton emission. The deepest limits rule out the weakest uncollimated GRB outflows, suggesting that IF the similarity of SLSNe-I with GRB/SNe extends to their fastest ejecta, then SLSNe-I are either powered by energetic jets pointed far away from our line of sight theta>30 deg, or harbor failed jets that do not successfully break through the stellar envelope. Furthermore, IF a magnetar central engine is responsible for the exceptional luminosity of SLSNe-I, our X-ray analysis favors large magnetic fields B>2x10^(14) G and ejecta masses M_ej>3 Msun in agreement with optical/UV studies. Finally, we constrain the pre-explosion mass-loss rate of stellar progenitors of SLSNe-I. For PTF12dam we infer Mdot<2x10^(-5) Msun/yr, suggesting that the SN shock interaction with the CSM is unlikely to supply the main source of energy powering the optical transient and that some SLSN-I progenitors end their life as compact stars surrounded by a low-density medium similar to long GRBs and Type Ib/c SNe.
  • We present the detection of persistent soft X-ray radiation with L_x ~ 10^41-10^42 erg/s at the location of the extremely luminous, double-humped transient ASASSN-15lh as revealed by Chandra and Swift. We interpret this finding in the context of observations from our multiwavelength campaign, which revealed the presence of weak narrow nebular emission features from the host-galaxy nucleus and clear differences with respect to superluminous supernova optical spectra. Significant UV flux variability on short time-scales detected at the time of the re-brightening disfavors the shock interaction scenario as the source of energy powering the long-lived UV emission, while deep radio limits exclude the presence of relativistic jets propagating into a low-density environment. We propose a model where the extreme luminosity and double-peaked temporal structure of ASASSN-15lh is powered by a central source of ionizing radiation that produces a sudden change of the ejecta opacity at later times. As a result, UV radiation can more easily escape, producing the second bump in the light-curve. We discuss different interpretations for the intrinsic nature of the ionizing source. We conclude that, IF the X-ray source is physically associated with the optical-UV transient, ASASSN-15lh most likely represents the tidal disruption of a main-sequence star by the most massive spinning black hole detected to date. In this case, ASASSN-15lh and similar events discovered in the future would constitute the most direct probes of very massive, dormant, spinning, supermassive black holes in galaxies. Future monitoring of the X-rays may allow us to distinguish between the supernova and TDE hypothesis.
  • The detection of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) in the solar neighborhood would have very important implications for GRB phenomenology. The leading theories for cosmological GRBs would not be able to explain such events. The final bursts of evaporating Primordial Black Holes (PBHs), however, would be a natural explanation for local GRBs. We present a novel technique that can constrain the distance to gamma-ray bursts using detections from widely separated, non-imaging spacecraft. This method can determine the actual distance to the burst if it is local. We applied this method to constrain distances to a sample of 36 short duration GRBs detected by the Interplanetary Network (IPN) that show observational properties that are expected from PBH evaporations. These bursts have minimum possible distances in the 10^13-10^18 cm (7-10^5 AU) range, consistent with the expected PBH energetics and with a possible origin in the solar neighborhood, although none of the bursts can be unambiguously demonstrated to be local. Assuming these bursts are real PBH events, we estimate lower limits on the PBH burst evaporation rate in the solar neighborhood.
  • We present multi-wavelength observations of SN2014C during the first 500 days. These observations represent the first solid detection of a young extragalactic stripped-envelope SN out to high-energy X-rays. SN2014C was the explosion of an H-stripped progenitor star with ordinary explosion parameters. However, over the time scale of ~1yr, SN2014C experienced a complete metamorphosis and evolved from an ordinary H-poor supernova of type Ib into a strongly interacting, H-rich supernova of type IIn. Signatures of the SN shock interacting with a dense medium are observed across the spectrum. Coordinated observations with Swift, Chandra and NuSTAR have captured the evolution in detail and revealed the presence of a massive shell of ~1 Msun of hydrogen-rich material at ~6d16 cm from the explosion site. We estimate that the shell was ejected by the progenitor star in the decades to centuries before core collapse. This result poses significant challenges to current theories of massive star evolution, as it requires a physical mechanism responsible for the ejection of the deepest hydrogen layer of H-poor SN progenitors synchronized with the onset of stellar collapse. Theoretical investigations point at binary interactions and/or instabilities during the last stages of nuclear burning in massive stars as potential triggers of the time-dependent mass loss. We constrain these scenarios utilizing the sample of 183 SNe Ib/c with public radio observations. Our analysis identifies SN2014C-like signatures in ~10% of SNe with constraining radio data. This fraction is somewhat larger but reasonably consistent with the expectation from the theory of recent envelope ejection due to binary evolution IF the ejected material can survive in the close environment for 1000-10000 yrs. Alternatively, nuclear burning instabilities extending all the way to the core C-burning phase might also play a critical role.
  • Gamma-ray burst GRB 140430A was detected by the Swift satellite and observed promptly with the imaging polarimeter RINGO3 mounted on the Liverpool Telescope, with observations beginning while the prompt $\gamma$-ray emission was still ongoing. In this paper, we present densely sampled (10-second temporal resolution) early optical light curves in 3 optical bands and limits to the degree of optical polarization. We compare optical, X-ray and gamma-ray properties and present an analysis of the optical emission during a period of high-energy flaring. The complex optical light curve cannot be explained merely with a combination of forward and reverse shock emission from a standard external shock, implying additional contribution of emission from internal shock dissipation. We estimate an upper limit for time averaged optical polarization during the prompt phase to be as low as P < 12% (1$\sigma$). This suggests that the optical flares and early afterglow emission in this GRB are not highly polarized. Alternatively, time averaging could mask the presence of otherwise polarized components of distinct origin at different polarization position angles.
  • We present a data-adaptive spectral method - Monte Carlo Singular Spectrum Analysis (MC-SSA) - and its modification to tackle astrophysical problems. Through numerical simulations we show the ability of the MC-SSA in dealing with $1/f^{\beta}$ power-law noise affected by photon counting statistics. Such noise process is simulated by a first-order autoregressive, AR(1) process corrupted by intrinsic Poisson noise. In doing so, we statistically estimate a basic stochastic variation of the source and the corresponding fluctuations due to the quantum nature of light. In addition, MC-SSA test retains its effectiveness even when a significant percentage of the signal falls below a certain level of detection, e.g., caused by the instrument sensitivity. The parsimonious approach presented here may be broadly applied, from the search for extrasolar planets to the extraction of low-intensity coherent phenomena probably hidden in high energy transients.
  • We study the late-time (t>0.5 days) X-ray afterglows of nearby (z<0.5) long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) with Swift and identify a population of explosions with slowly decaying, super-soft (photon index Gamma_x>3) X-ray emission that is inconsistent with forward shock synchrotron radiation associated with the afterglow. These explosions also show larger-than-average intrinsic absorption (NH_x,i >6d21 cm-2) and prompt gamma-ray emission with extremely long duration (T_90>1000 s). Chance association of these three rare properties (i.e. large NH_x,i, super-soft Gamma_x and extreme duration) in the same class of explosions is statistically unlikely. We associate these properties with the turbulent mass-loss history of the progenitor star that enriched and shaped the circum-burst medium. We identify a natural connection between NH_x,i Gamma_x and T_90 in these sources by suggesting that the late-time super-soft X-rays originate from radiation reprocessed by material lost to the environment by the stellar progenitor before exploding, (either in the form of a dust echo or as reprocessed radiation from a long-lived GRB remnant), and that the interaction of the explosion's shock/jet with the complex medium is the source of the extremely long prompt emission. However, current observations do not allow us to exclude the possibility that super-soft X-ray emitters originate from peculiar stellar progenitors with large radii that only form in very dusty environments.
  • We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parametrization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. (2007) and Melandri et al. (2010) in which the typical frequency of the reverse shock was suggested to lie at radio, rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct reverse-shock radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1 -- 1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects - typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical reverse-shock emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/mm emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency reverse shocks at early time.
  • We present a wide dataset of gamma-ray, X-ray, UVOIR, and radio observations of the Swift GRB100814A. At the end of the slow decline phase of the X-ray and optical afterglow, this burst shows a sudden and prominent rebrightening in the optical band only, followed by a fast decay in both bands. The optical rebrightening also shows chromatic evolution. Such a puzzling behaviour cannot be explained by a single component model. We discuss other possible interpretations, and we find that a model that incorporates a long-lived reverse shock and forward shock fits the temporal and spectral properties of GRB100814A the best.
  • Prompt gamma-ray and early X-ray afterglow emission in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are characterized by a bursty behavior and are often interspersed with long quiescent times. There is compelling evidence that X-ray flares are linked to prompt gamma-rays. However, the physical mechanism that leads to the complex temporal distribution of gamma-ray pulses and X-ray flares is not understood. Here we show that the waiting time distribution (WTD) of pulses and flares exhibits a power-law tail extending over 4 decades with index ~2 and can be the manifestation of a common time-dependent Poisson process. This result is robust and is obtained on different catalogs. Surprisingly, GRBs with many (>=8) gamma-ray pulses are very unlikely to be accompanied by X-ray flares after the end of the prompt emission (3.1 sigma Gaussian confidence). These results are consistent with a simple interpretation: an hyperaccreting disk breaks up into one or a few groups of fragments, each of which is independently accreted with the same probability per unit time. Prompt gamma-rays and late X-ray flares are nothing but different fragments being accreted at the beginning and at the end, respectively, following the very same stochastic process and likely the same mechanism.
  • This is a White Paper in support of the mission concept of the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT), proposed as a medium-sized ESA mission. We discuss the potential of LOFT for the study of gamma-ray bursts. For a summary, we refer to the paper.
  • We present a novel algorithm aimed at identifying peaks within a uniformly sampled time series affected by uncorrelated Gaussian noise. The algorithm, called "MEPSA" (multiple excess peak search algorithm), essentially scans the time series at different timescales by comparing a given peak candidate with a variable number of adjacent bins. While this has originally been conceived for the analysis of gamma-ray burst light (GRB) curves, its usage can be readily extended to other astrophysical transient phenomena, whose activity is recorded through different surveys. We tested and validated it through simulated featureless profiles as well as simulated GRB time profiles. We showcase the algorithm's potential by comparing with the popular algorithm by Li and Fenimore, that is frequently adopted in the literature. Thanks to its high flexibility, the mask of excess patterns used by MEPSA can be tailored and optimised to the kind of data to be analysed without modifying the code. The C code is made publicly available.
  • A sizeable fraction of gamma-ray burst (GRB) time profiles consist of a temporal sequence of pulses. The nature of this stochastic process carries information on how GRB inner engines work. The so-called interpulse time defines the interval between adjacent pulses, excluding the long quiescence periods during which the signal drops to the background level. It was found by many authors in the past that interpulse times are lognormally distributed, at variance with the exponential case that is expected for a memoryless process. We investigated whether the simple hypothesis of a temporally uncorrelated sequence of pulses is really to be rejected, as a lognormal distribution necessarily implies. We selected and analysed a number of multi--peaked CGRO/BATSE GRBs and simulated similar time profiles, with the crucial difference that we assumed exponentially distributed interpulse times, as is expected for a memoryless stationary Poisson process. We then identified peaks in both data sets using a novel peak search algorithm, which is more efficient than others used in the past. We independently confirmed that the observed interpulse time distribution is approximately lognormal. However, we found the same results on the simulated profiles, in spite of the intrinsic exponential distribution. Although intrinsic lognormality cannot be ruled out, this shows that intrinsic interpulse time distribution in real data could still be exponential, while the observed lognormal could be ascribed to the low efficiency of peak search algorithms at short values combined with the limitations of a bin-integrated profile. Our result suggests that GRB engines may emit pulses after the fashion of nuclear radioactive decay, that is, as a memoryless process.
  • Deep late-time X-ray observations of the relativistic, engine-driven, type Ic SN2012ap allow us to probe the nearby environment of the explosion and reveal the unique properties of relativistic SNe. We find that on a local scale of ~0.01 pc the environment was shaped directly by the evolution of the progenitor star with a pre-explosion mass-loss rate <5x10^-6 Msun yr-1 in line with GRBs and the other relativistic SN2009bb. Like sub-energetic GRBs, SN2012ap is characterized by a bright radio emission and evidence for mildly relativistic ejecta. However, its late time (t~20 days) X-ray emission is ~100 times fainter than the faintest sub-energetic GRB at the same epoch, with no evidence for late-time central engine activity. These results support theoretical proposals that link relativistic SNe like 2009bb and 2012ap with the weakest observed engine-driven explosions, where the jet barely fails to breakout. Furthermore, our observations demonstrate that the difference between relativistic SNe and sub-energetic GRBs is intrinsic and not due to line-of-sight effects. This phenomenology can either be due to an intrinsically shorter-lived engine or to a more extended progenitor in relativistic SNe.