• We have imaged N\'eel skyrmion bubbles in perpendicularly magnetised polycrystalline multilayers patterned into 1 \mu m diameter dots, using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy. The skyrmion bubbles can be nucleated by the application of an external magnetic field and are stable at zero field with a diameter of 260 nm. Applying an out of plane field that opposes the magnetisation of the skyrmion bubble core moment applies pressure to the bubble and gradually compresses it to a diameter of approximately 100 nm. On removing the field the skyrmion bubble returns to its original diameter via a hysteretic pathway where most of the expansion occurs in a single abrupt step. This contradicts analytical models of homogeneous materials in which the skyrmion compression and expansion are reversible. Micromagnetic simulations incorporating disorder can explain this behaviour using an effective thickness modulation between 10 nm grains.
  • The interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) has been shown to stabilize homochiral N\'eel-type domain walls in thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and as a result permit them to be propagated by a spin Hall torque. In this study, we demonstrate that in Ta/Co$_{20}$Fe$_{60}$B$_{20}$/MgO the DMI may be influenced by annealing. We find that the DMI peaks at $D=0.057\pm0.003$ mJ/m$^{2}$ at an annealing temperature of 230 $^{\circ}$C. DMI fields were measured using a purely field-driven creep regime domain expansion technique. The DMI field and the anisotropy field follow a similar trend as a function of annealing temperature. We infer that the behavior of the DMI and the anisotropy are related to interfacial crystal ordering and B expulsion out of the CoFeB layer as the annealing temperature is increased.
  • We report on the crossover from the thermal to athermal regime of an artificial spin ice formed from a square array of magnetic islands whose lateral size, 30~nm~$\times$~70~nm, is small enough that they are superparamagnetic at room temperature. We used resonant magnetic soft x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) as a method to observe the time-time correlations of the fluctuating magnetic configurations of spin ice during cooling, which are found to slow abruptly as a freezing temperature $T_0 = 178 \pm 5$~K is approached. This slowing is well-described by a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law, implying that the frozen state is glassy, with the freezing temperature being commensurate with the strength of magnetostatic interaction energies in the array. The activation temperature, $T_\mathrm{A} = 40 \pm 10$~K, is much less than that expected from a Stoner-Wohlfarth coherent rotation model. Zero-field-cooled/field-cooled magnetometry reveals a freeing up of fluctuations of states within islands above this temperature, caused by variation in the local anisotropy axes at the oxidised edges. This Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann behavior implies that the system enters a glassy state on freezing, which is unexpected for a system with a well-defined ground state.
  • Using Lorentz transmission electron microscopy we investigate the behavior of domain walls pinned at non-topographic defects in Cr(3 nm)/Permalloy(10 nm)/Cr(5 nm) nanowires of width 500 nm. The pinning sites consist of linear defects where magnetic properties are modified by a Ga ion probe with diameter ~ 10 nm using a focused ion beam microscope. We study the detailed change of the modified region (which is on the scale of the focused ion spot) using electron energy loss spectroscopy and differential phase contrast imaging on an aberration (Cs) corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. The signal variation observed indicates that the region modified by the irradiation corresponds to ~ 40-50 nm despite the ion probe size of only 10 nm. Employing the Fresnel mode of Lorentz transmission electron microscopy, we show that it is possible to control the domain wall structure and its depinning strength not only via the irradiation dose but also the line orientation.
  • We report current-induced domain wall motion (CIDWM) in Ta\Co20Fe60B20\MgO nanowires. Domain walls are observed to move against the electron flow when no magnetic field is applied, while a field along the nanowires strongly affects the domain wall motion direction and velocity. A symmetric effect is observed for up-down and down-up domain walls. This indicates the presence of right-handed domain walls, due to a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) with a DMI coefficient D=+0.06 mJ/m2. The positive DMI coefficient is interpreted to be a consequence of boron diffusion into the tantalum buffer layer during annealing. In a Pt\Co68Fe22B10\MgO nanowire CIDWM along the electron flow was observed, corroborating this interpretation. The experimental results are compared to 1D-model simulations including the effects of pinning. This advanced modelling allows us to reproduce the experiment outcomes and reliably extract a spin-Hall angle {\theta}SH=-0.11 for Ta in the nanowires, showing the importance of an analysis that goes beyond the currently used model for perfect nanowires.
  • A textured thin film of FeGe was grown by magnetron sputtering with a helimagnetic ordering temperature of TN = 276 +/- 2 K. From 5 K to room temperature a variety of scattering processes contribute towards the overall longitudinal and Hall resistivities. These were studied by combining magnetometry and magnetotransport measurements. The high-field magnetoresistance (MR) displays three clear temperature regimes: Lorentz force MR dominates at low temperatures, above T ~ 80 K scattering from spin-waves predominates, whilst finally for T > 200 K scattering from fluctuating local moments describes the MR. At low fields, where the magnetisation is no longer technically saturated, we find a scaling of magnetoresistance with the square of the magnetisation, indicating that the MR due to the unwinding of spins in the conical phase arises from a similar mechanism to that in magnetic domain walls. This MR is only visible up to a temperature of about 200 K. No features can be found in the temperature or field dependence of the longitudinal resistivity that belie the presence of the underlying magnetic phase transition at TN: the marked changes in behavior are at much lower temperatures. The anomalous Hall effect has a dramatic temperature dependence in which the anomalous Hall resistivity scales quadratically with the longitudinal resistivity: comparison with anomalous Hall scaling theory shows that our system is in the intrinsic 'moderately dirty' regime. Lastly, we find evidence of a topological Hall effect of size 100 ~Ohm cm.
  • Using X-ray photoelectron emission microscopy we have observed the coexistence of ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases in a (3 at.%)Pd-doped FeRh epilayer. By quantitatively analyzing the resultant images we observe that as the epilayer transforms there is a change in magnetic domain symmetry from predominantly twofold at lower temperatures through to an equally weighted combination of both four and twofold symmetries at higher temperature. It is postulated that the lowered symmetry Ising-like nematic phase resides at the near-surface of the epilayer. This behavior is different to that of undoped FeRh suggesting that the variation in symmetry is driven by the competing structural and electronic interactions in the nanoscale FeRh film coupled with the effect of the chemical doping disorder.
  • We describe a field-driven domain wall creep-based method for the quantification of interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions (DMI) in perpendicularly magnetized thin films. The use of only magnetic fields to drive wall motion removes the possibility of mixing with current-related effects such as spin Hall effect or Rashba field, as well as the complexity arising from lithographic patterning. We demonstrate this method on sputtered Pt/Co/Ir/Pt multilayers with a variable Ir layer thickness. By inserting an ultrathin layer of Ir at the Co/Pt interface we can reverse the sign of the effective DMI acting on the sandwiched Co layer, and therefore continuously change the domain wall (DW) structure from right- to the left-handed N\'{e}el wall. We also show that the DMI shows exquisite sensitivity to the exact details of the atomic structure at the film interfaces by comparison with a symmetric epitaxial Pt/Co/Pt multilayer.
  • We have investigated the Co-doping dependence of the structural, transport, and magnetic properties of \epsilon-FeCoSi epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy on silicon (111) substrates. Low energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy studies have confirmed the growth of phase-pure, defect-free \epsilon-FeCoSi epitaxial films with a surface roughness of ~1 nm. These epilayers are strained due to lattice mismatch with the substrate, deforming the cubic B20 lattice so that it becomes rhombohedral. The temperature dependence of the resistivity changes as the Co concentration is increased, being semiconducting-like for low $x$ and metallic-like for x \gtrsim 0.3. The films exhibit the positive linear magnetoresistance that is characteristic of \epsilon-FeCoSi below their magnetic ordering temperatures $T_\mathrm{ord}$, as well as the huge anomalous Hall effect of order several \mu\Omega cm. The ordering temperatures are higher than those observed in bulk, up to 77 K for x = 0.4. The saturation magnetic moment of the films varies as a function of Co doping, with a contribution of ~1 \mu_{B}/ Co atom for x \lesssim 0.25. When taken in combination with the carrier density derived from the ordinary Hall effect, this signifies a highly spin-polarised electron gas in the low x, semiconducting regime.
  • The antiferromagnetic ground state and the metamagnetic transition to the ferromagnetic state of CsCl-ordered FeRh epilayers have been characterized using Hall and magnetoresistance measure- ments. On cooling into the ground state, the metamagnetic transition is found to coincide with a suppression in carrier density of at least an order of magnitude below the typical metallic level shown by the ferromagnetic state. The data reveal that this sub-metallic density of electron-like majority carriers in the antiferromagnetic phase are attributable to intrinsic doping from Fe/Rh substitution defects, with approximately two electrons per pair of atoms swapped. Based on these observations it is suggested that an orbital selective Mott transition, selective to the Fe 3d electrons drives the metamagnetic transition.
  • Quenched disorder affects how non-equilibrium systems respond to driving. In the context of artificial spin ice, an athermal system comprised of geometrically frustrated classical Ising spins with a two-fold degenerate ground state, we give experimental and numerical evidence of how such disorder washes out edge effects, and provide an estimate of disorder strength in the experimental system. We prove analytically that a sequence of applied fields with fixed amplitude is unable to drive the system to its ground state from a saturated state. These results should be relevant for other systems where disorder does not change the nature of the ground state.
  • The thermally-driven formation and evolution of vertex domains is studied for square artificial spin ice. A self consistent mean field theory is used to show how domains of ground state ordering form spontaneously, and how these evolve in the presence of disorder. The role of fluctuations is studied, using Monte Carlo simulations and analytical modelling. Domain wall dynamics are shown to be driven by a biasing of random fluctuations towards processes that shrink closed domains, and fluctuations within domains are shown to generate isolated small excitations, which may stabilise as the effective temperature is lowered. Domain dynamics and fluctuations are determined by interaction strengths, which are controlled by inter-element spacing. The role of interaction strength is studied via experiments and Monte Carlo simulations. Our mean field model is applicable to ferroelectric `spin' ice, and we show that features similar to that of magnetic spin ice can be expected, but with different characteristic temperatures and rates.
  • Using spin waves we directly probe the interface of an exchange biased Ni$_{80}$Fe$_{20}$/Ir$_{25}$Mn$_{75}$ film which has been modified by the presence of an Au dusting layer. Combining this experimental data with a discretised simulation model, parameters relating to interface exchange coupling and modification of interface magnetisation are determined. Exchange coupling is found to be relatively uniform as gold thickness is increased, and undergoes a sudden drop at 1.5$\textrm{\AA}$ of gold. Interface magnetisation decreases as a function of the gold dusting thickness. Antiparallel alignment of the ferromagnet and antiferromagnet supress the interface magnetisation compared to when they are in parallel alignment. These findings imply that the interface region has specific magnetisation states which depend on the ferromagnet orientation.
  • Making use of focused Ga-ion beam (FIB) fabrication technology, the evolution with device dimension of the low-temperature electrical properties of Nb nanowires has been examined in a regime where crossover from Josephson-like to insulating behaviour is evident. Resistance-temperature data for devices with a physical width of order 100 nm demonstrate suppression of superconductivity, leading to dissipative behaviour that is shown to be consistent with the activation of phase-slip below Tc. This study suggests that by exploiting the Ga-impurity poisoning introduced by the FIB into the periphery of the nanowire, a central superconducting phase-slip nanowire with sub-10 nm dimensions may be engineered within the core of the nanowire.
  • In this communication we present our response to the recent comment of A. Engel regarding our paper on FIB- fabricated Nb nanowires (see Vol. 20 (2009) Pag. 465302). After further analysis and additional experimental evidence, we conclude that our interpretation of the experimental results in light of QPS theory is still valid when compared with the alternative proximity-based model as proposed by A. Engel.
  • We determine the composition of intrinsic as well as extrinsic contributions to the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in the isoelectronic L1o FePd and FePt alloys. We show that the AHE signal in our 30 nm thick epitaxially deposited films of FePd is mainly due to extrinsic side-jump, while in the epitaxial FePt films of the same thickness and degree of order the intrinsic contribution is dominating over the extrinsic mechanisms of the AHE. We relate this crossover to the difference in spin-orbit strength of Pt and Pd atoms and suggest that this phenomenon can be used for tuning the origins of the AHE in complex alloys.
  • We present the results of experimental investigations of magnetic switching and magnetotransport in a new generation of magnetic devices containing artificially patterned domains. Our devices are realised by locally reducing the coercive field of a perpendicularly magnetised Pt (3.5 nm)/Co (0.5 nm)/Pt (1.6 nm) trilayer structure using a gallium focused ion beam (FIB). Artificial domain walls are created at the interfaces between dosed and undosed regions when an external magnetic field switches the former but not the latter. We have exploited this property to create stripe-like domains with widths down to sub-micron lengthscales, separated by undosed regions. Using the extraordinary Hall effect to monitor the local magnetisation we have investigated the reversal dynamics of these artificial domains by measuring major and minor hysteresis loops. The coercive field of regions irradiated with identical doses systematically increases as their size decreases. In the lower branch of minor loops, reversal is seen to occur via a few large Barkhausen events. Preliminary measurements of transport across domain walls reveal a positive domain wall resistance, that does not change sign from 4.2 K to 300 K.
  • The effects of inserting impurity $\delta$-layers of various elements into a Co/IrMn exchange biased bilayer, at both the interface, and at given points within the IrMn layer a distance from the interface, has been investigated. Depending on the chemical species of dopant, and its position, we found that the exchange biasing can be either strongly enhanced or suppressed. We show that biasing is enhanced with a dusting of certain magnetic impurities, present at either at the interface or sufficiently far away from the Co/IrMn interface. This illustrates that the final spin structure at the Co/IrMn interface is not only governed by interface structure/roughness but is also mediated by local exchange or anisotropy variations within the bulk of the IrMn.
  • We exploit the ability to precisely control the magnetic domain structure of perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/Pt trilayers to fabricate artificial domain wall arrays and study their transport properties. The scaling behaviour of this model system confirms the intrinsic domain wall origin of the magnetoresistance, and systematic studies using domains patterned at various angles to the current flow are excellently described by an angular-dependent resistivity tensor containing perpendicular and parallel domain wall resistivities. We find that the latter are fully consistent with Levy-Zhang theory, which allows us to estimate the ratio of minority to majority spin carrier resistivities, rho-down/rho-up~5.5, in good agreement with thin film band structure calculations.
  • We have investigated CuNi/Nb/CuNi trilayers, as have been recently used as the core structure of a spin-valve like device [J. Y. Gu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 267001 (2002)] to study the effect of magnetic configurations of the CuNi layers on the critical temperature, Tc, of the superconducting Nb. After reproducing a Tc shift of a few mK, we have gone on to explore the performance limits of the structure. The results showed the Tc shift we found to be quite close to the basic limits of this particular materials system. The ratio between the thickness and the coherence length of the superconductor and the interfacial transparency were the main features limiting the Tc shift.
  • We present magnetotransport results for a 2D electron gas (2DEG) subject to the quasi-random magnetic field produced by randomly positioned sub-micron Co dots deposited onto the surface of a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. We observe strong local and non-local anisotropic magnetoresistance for external magnetic fields in the plane of the 2DEG. Monte-Carlo calculations confirm that this is due to the changing topology of the quasi-random magnetic field in which electrons are guided predominantly along contours of zero magnetic field.