• The project Massive Unseen Companions to Hot Faint Underluminous Stars from SDSS (MUCHFUSS) aims to find sdBs with compact companions like massive white dwarfs, neutron stars or black holes. Here we provide classifications, atmospheric parameters and a complete radial velocity (RV) catalogue containing 1914 single measurements for an sample of 177 hot subluminous stars discovered based on SDSS DR7. 110 stars show significant RV variability, while 67 qualify as candidates. We constrain the fraction of close massive compact companions {of hydrogen-rich hot subdwarfs} in our sample to be smaller than $\sim1.3\%$, which is already close to the theoretical predictions. However, the sample might still contain such binaries with longer periods exceeding $\sim8\,{\rm d}$. We detect a mismatch between the $\Delta RV_{\rm max}$-distribution of the sdB and the more evolved sdOB and sdO stars, which challenges our understanding of their evolutionary connection. Furthermore, irregular RV variations of unknown origin with amplitudes of up to $\sim180\,{\rm km\,s^{-1}}$ on timescales of years, days and even hours have been detected in some He-sdO stars. They might be connected to irregular photometric variations in some cases.
  • Hot subdwarfs (sdBs) are core helium-burning stars, which lost almost their entire hydrogen envelope in the red-giant phase. Since a high fraction of those stars are in close binary systems, common envelope ejection is an important formation channel. We identified a total population of 51 close sdB+WD binaries based on time-resolved spectroscopy and multi-band photometry, derive the WD mass distribution and constrain the future evolution of these systems. Most WDs in those binaries have masses significantly below the average mass of single WDs and a high fraction of them might therefore have helium cores. We found 12 systems that will merge in less than a Hubble time and evolve to become either massive C/O WDs, AM\,CVn systems, RCrB stars or even explode as supernovae type Ia.
  • AIMS: We selected the bluest object, WISE~J0725$-$2351, from Luhman's new high proper motion (HPM) survey based on observations with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) for spectroscopic follow-up observations. Our aim was to unravel the nature of this relatively bright ($V$$\sim$12, $J$$\sim$11) HPM star ($\mu$$=$267\,mas/yr). METHODS: We obtained low- and medium-resolution spectra with the European Southern Observatory (ESO) New Technology Telescope (NTT)/EFOSC2 and Very Large Telescope (VLT)/XSHOOTER instruments, investigated the radial velocity and performed a quantitative spectral analysis that allowed us to determine physical parameters. The fit of the spectral energy distribution based on the available photometry to low-metallicity model spectra and the similarity of our target to a metal-poor benchmark star (HD~84937) allowed us to estimate the distance and space velocity. RESULTS: As in the case of HD~84937, we classified WISE~J0725$-$2351 as sdF5: or a metal-poor turnoff star with $[Fe/H]$$=$$-$2.0$\pm$0.2, $T_{eff}$$=$6250$\pm$100\,K, $\log{g}$$=$4.0$\pm$0.2, and a possible age of about 12\,Gyr. At an estimated distance of more than 400\,pc, its proper motion translates to a tangential velocity of more than 500\,km/s. Together with its constant (on timescales of hours, days, and months) and large radial velocity (about $+$240\,km/s), the resulting Galactic restframe velocity is about 460\,km/s, implying a bound retrograde orbit for this extreme halo object that currently crosses the Galactic plane at high speed.
  • Hot subdwarf B stars (sdBs) are core helium-burning stars located on the extreme horizontal branch. About half of the known sdB stars are found in close binaries. Their short orbital periods of 1.2 h to a few days suggest that they are post common-envelope systems. Eclipsing hot subdwarf binaries are rare, but important to determine the fundamental stellar parameters. Low-mass companions are identified by the reflection effect. In most cases the companion is a main sequence star near the stellar mass limit. Here we report the discovery of an eclipsing hot subdwarf binary SDSS J162256.66+473051.1 (J1622) of very short orbital period (0.0697 d), found in the course of the MUCHFUSS project. The lightcurve shows grazing eclipses and a prominent reflection effect. An analysis of the light- and radial velocity (RV) curves indicated a mass ratio of $q=$ 0.1325, an RV semiamplitude $K=47.2\rm\,km\,s^{-1}$, and an inclination of $i=72.33^\circ$. We show that a companion mass of 0.064 $M_{\rm \odot}$, well below the hydrogen-burning limit, is the most plausible solution, which implies a mass close to the canonical mass (0.47 $M_{\rm \odot}$) of the sdB star. Therefore, the companion is a brown dwarf, which not only survived the engulfment by the red-giant envelope, but also triggered its ejection, and enabled the sdB star to form. The rotation of J1622 is expected to be tidally locked to the orbit. However, J1622 rotates too slowly ($v_{\rm rot}=74.5\pm 7\rm\,km\,s^{-1}$) to be synchronized, challenging tidal interaction models.
  • Short duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are thought to be related to the violent merger of compact objects, such as neutron stars or black holes, which makes them promising sources of gravitational waves. The detection of a 'kilonova'-like signature associated to the Swift-detected GRB 130603B has suggested that this event is the result of a compact object merger. Our knowledge on SGRB has been, until now, mostly based on the absence of supernova signatures and the analysis of the host galaxies to which they cannot always be securely associated. Further progress has been significantly hampered by the faintness and rapid fading of their optical counterparts (afterglows), which has so far precluded spectroscopy of such events. Afterglow spectroscopy is the key tool to firmly determine the distance at which the burst was produced, crucial to understand its physics, and study its local environment. Here we present the first spectra of a prototypical SGRB afterglow in which both absorption and emission features are clearly detected. Together with multiwavelength photometry we study the host and environment of GRB 130603B. From these spectra we determine the redshift of the burst to be z = 0.3565+/-0.0002, measure rich dynamics both in absorption and emission, and a substantial line of sight extinction of A_V = 0.86+/-0.15 mag. The GRB was located at the edge of a disrupted arm of a moderately star forming galaxy with near-solar metallicity. Unlike for most long GRBs (LGRBs), N_HX / A_V is consistent with the Galactic ratio, indicating that the explosion site differs from those found in LGRBs. The merger is not associated with the most star-forming region of the galaxy; however, it did occur in a dense region, implying a rapid merger or a low natal kick velocity for the compact object binary.
  • We started a new project which aims to find compact hot subdwarf binaries at low Galactic latitudes. Targets are selected from several photometric surveys and a spectroscopic follow-up campaign to find radial velocity variations on timescales as short as tens of minutes has been started. Once radial variations are detected phase-resolved spectroscopy is obtained to measure the radial velocity curve and the mass function of the system. The observing strategy is described and the discovery of two short period hot subdwarf binaries is presented. UVEXJ032855.25+503529.8 contains a hot subdwarf B star (sdB) orbited by a cool M-dwarf in a P=0.11017 days orbit. The lightcurve shows a strong reflection effect but no eclipses are visible. HS 1741+2133 is a short period (P=0.20 days) sdB most likely with a white dwarf (WD) companion.
  • Hot subdwarf B stars (sdBs) are evolved core helium-burning stars with very thin hydrogen envelopes. In order to form an sdB, the progenitor has to lose almost all of its hydrogen envelope right at the tip of the red giant branch. In close binary systems, mass transfer to the companion provides the extraordinary mass loss required for their formation. However, apparently single sdBs exist as well and their formation is unclear since decades. The merger of helium white dwarfs leading to an ignition of core helium-burning or the merger of a helium core and a low mass star during the common envelope phase have been proposed. Here we report the discovery of SB 290 as the first apparently single fast rotating sdB star located on the extreme horizontal branch indicating that those stars may form from mergers.
  • It has been suggested that besides stellar companions, substellar objects in close orbits may be able to trigger mass loss in a common envelope phase and form hot subdwarfs. In an ongoing project we search for close substellar companions combining time resolved high resolution spectroscopy with photometry. We determine the fraction of as yet undetected radial velocity variable systems from a sample of 27 apparently single sdB stars to be 16%. We discovered low-mass stellar companions to the He-sdB CPD-20 1123 and the pulsator KPD 0629-0016. The brown dwarf reported to orbit the eclipsing binary SDSS J0820+0008 could be confirmed by an analysis of high resolution spectra taken with UVES. Reflection effects have been detected in the light curves of the known sdB binaries CPD-64 481 and BPS CS 22169-0001. The inclinations of these systems must be much higher than expected and the most likely companion masses are in the substellar regime. Finally, we determined the orbit of the sdB binary PHL 457, which has a very small radial velocity amplitude and may host the lowest mass substellar companion known. The implications of these new results for the open question of sdB formation are discussed.