• Superconducting spintronics in hybrid superconductor/ferromagnet (S-F) heterostructures provides an exciting potential new class of device. The prototypical super-spintronic device is the superconducting spin-valve, where the critical temperature, $T_c$, of the S-layer can be controlled by the relative orientation of two (or more) F-layers. Here, we show that such control is also possible in a simple S/F bilayer. Using field history to set the remanent magnetic state of a thin Er layer, we demonstrate for a Nb/Er bilayer a high level of control of both $T_c$ and the shape of the resistive transition, R(T), to zero resistance. We are able to model the origin of the remanent magnetization, treating it as an increase in the effective exchange field of the ferromagnet and link this, using conventional S-F theory, to the suppression of $T_c$. We observe stepped features in the R(T) which we argue is due to a fundamental interaction of superconductivity with inhomogeneous ferromagnetism, a phenomena currently lacking theoretical description.
  • Using X-ray photoelectron emission microscopy we have observed the coexistence of ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases in a (3 at.%)Pd-doped FeRh epilayer. By quantitatively analyzing the resultant images we observe that as the epilayer transforms there is a change in magnetic domain symmetry from predominantly twofold at lower temperatures through to an equally weighted combination of both four and twofold symmetries at higher temperature. It is postulated that the lowered symmetry Ising-like nematic phase resides at the near-surface of the epilayer. This behavior is different to that of undoped FeRh suggesting that the variation in symmetry is driven by the competing structural and electronic interactions in the nanoscale FeRh film coupled with the effect of the chemical doping disorder.