• We report the first detections of the repeating fast radio burst source FRB 121102 above 5.2 GHz. Observations were performed using the 4$-$8 GHz receiver of the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope with the Breakthrough Listen digital backend. We present the spectral, temporal and polarization properties of 21 bursts detected within the first 60 minutes of a total 6-hour observations. These observations comprise the highest burst density yet reported in the literature, with 18 bursts being detected in the first 30 minutes. A few bursts clearly show temporal sub-structures with distinct spectral properties. These sub-structures superimpose to provide enhanced peak signal-to-noise ratio at higher trial dispersion measures. Broad features occur in $\sim 1$ GHz wide subbands that typically differ in peak frequency between bursts within the band. Finer-scale structures ($\sim 10-50$ MHz) within these bursts are consistent with that expected from Galactic diffractive interstellar scintillation. The bursts exhibit nearly 100% linear polarization, and a large average rotation measure of 9.359$\pm$0.012 $\times$ 10$^{\rm 4}$ rad m$^{\rm -2}$ (in the observer's frame). No circular polarization was found for any burst. We measure an approximately constant polarization position angle in the 13 brightest bursts. The peak flux densities of the reported bursts have average values (0.2$\pm$0.1 Jy), similar to those seen at lower frequencies ($<3$ GHz), while the average burst widths (0.64$\pm$0.46 ms) are relatively narrower.
  • We present SMA and NOEMA observations of the host galaxy of FRB 121102 in the CO 3-2 and 1-0 transitions, respectively. We do not detect emission from either transition. We set $3\sigma$ upper limits to the CO luminosity $L_{CO} < 2.5 \times 10^7\,{\rm K\,km\,s}^{-1} {\, \rm pc^{-2}}$ for CO 3-2 and $L_{CO} < 2.3 \times 10^9\, {\rm K\,km\,s}^{-1} {\, \rm pc^{-2}}$ for CO 1-0. For Milky-Way-like star formation properties, we set a $3\sigma$ upper limit on the $H_2$ mass of $2.5 \times 10^8 \rm\ M_{\odot}$, slightly less than the predictions for the $H_2$ mass based on the star formation rate. The true constraint on the $H_2$ mass may be significantly higher, however, because of the reduction in CO luminosity that is common forlow-metallicity dwarf galaxies like the FRB host galaxy. These results demonstrate the challenge of identifying the nature of FRB progenitors through study of the host galaxy molecular gas. We also place a limit of 42 $\mu$Jy ($3\sigma$) on the continuum flux density of the persistent radio source at 97 GHz, consistent with a power-law extrapolation of the low frequency spectrum, which may arise from an AGN or other nonthermal source.
  • We present LOFAR high-band data over the frequency range 115-189 MHz for the X-ray binary SS 433, obtained in an observing campaign from 2013 February - 2014 May. Our results include a deep, wide-field map, allowing a detailed view of the surrounding supernova remnant W 50 at low radio frequencies, as well as a light curve for SS 433 determined from shorter monitoring runs. The complex morphology of W 50 is in excellent agreement with previously published higher-frequency maps; we find additional evidence for a spectral turnover in the eastern wing, potentially due to foreground free-free absorption. Furthermore, SS 433 is tentatively variable at 150 MHz, with both a debiased modulation index of 11 per cent and a $\chi^2$ probability of a flat light curve of $8.2 \times 10^{-3}$. By comparing the LOFAR flux densities with contemporaneous observations carried out at 4800 MHz with the RATAN-600 telescope, we suggest that an observed $\sim$0.5-1 Jy rise in the 150-MHz flux density may correspond to sustained flaring activity over a period of approximately six months at 4800 MHz. However, the increase is too large to be explained with a standard synchrotron bubble model. We also detect a wealth of structure along the nearby Galactic plane, including the most complete detection to date of the radio shell of the candidate supernova remnant G 38.7-1.4. This further demonstrates the potential of supernova remnant studies with the current generation of low-frequency radio telescopes.
  • Radio interferometers have the ability to precisely localize and better characterize the properties of sources. This ability is having a powerful impact on the study of fast radio transients, where a few milliseconds of data is enough to pinpoint a source at cosmological distances. However, recording interferometric data at millisecond cadence produces a terabyte-per-hour data stream that strains networks, computing systems, and archives. This challenge mirrors that of other domains of science, where the science scope is limited by the computational architecture as much as the physical processes at play. Here, we present a solution to this problem in the context of radio transients: realfast, a commensal, fast transient search system at the Jansky Very Large Array. Realfast uses a novel architecture to distribute fast-sampled interferometric data to a 32-node, 64-GPU cluster for real-time imaging and transient detection. By detecting transients in situ, we can trigger the recording of data for those rare, brief instants when the event occurs and reduce the recorded data volume by a factor of 1000. This makes it possible to commensally search a data stream that would otherwise be impossible to record. This system will search for millisecond transients in more than 1000 hours of data per year, potentially localizing several Fast Radio Bursts, pulsars, and other sources of impulsive radio emission. We describe the science scope for realfast, the system design, expected outcomes, and ways real-time analysis can help in other fields of astrophysics.
  • Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-duration, extragalactic radio flashes of unknown physical origin. FRB 121102, the only known repeating FRB source, has been localized to a star-forming region in a dwarf galaxy at redshift z = 0.193, and is spatially coincident with a compact, persistent radio source. The origin of the bursts, the nature of the persistent source, and the properties of the local environment are still debated. Here we present bursts that show ~100% linearly polarized emission at a very high and variable Faraday rotation measure in the source frame: RM_src = +1.46 x 10^5 rad m^-2 and +1.33 x 10^5 rad m^-2 at epochs separated by 7 months, in addition to narrow (< 30 mus) temporal structure. The large and variable rotation measure demonstrates that FRB 121102 is in an extreme and dynamic magneto-ionic environment, while the short burst durations argue for a neutron star origin. Such large rotation measures have, until now, only been observed in the vicinities of massive black holes (M_BH > 10^4 MSun). Indeed, the properties of the persistent radio source are compatible with those of a low-luminosity, accreting massive black hole. The bursts may thus come from a neutron star in such an environment. However, the observed properties may also be explainable in other models, such as a highly magnetized wind nebula or supernova remnant surrounding a young neutron star.
  • We undertook coordinated campaigns with the Green Bank, Effelsberg, and Arecibo radio telescopes during Chandra X-ray Observatory and XMM-Newton observations of the repeating fast radio burst FRB 121102 to search for simultaneous radio and X-ray bursts. We find 12 radio bursts from FRB 121102 during 70 ks total of X-ray observations. We detect no X-ray photons at the times of radio bursts from FRB 121102 and further detect no X-ray bursts above the measured background at any time. We place a 5$\sigma$ upper limit of $3\times10^{-11}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ on the 0.5--10 keV fluence for X-ray bursts at the time of radio bursts for durations $<700$ ms, which corresponds to a burst energy of $4\times10^{45}$ erg at the measured distance of FRB 121102. We also place limits on the 0.5--10 keV fluence of $5\times10^{-10}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ and $1\times10^{-9}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ for bursts emitted at any time during the XMM-Newton and Chandra observations, respectively, assuming a typical X-ray burst duration of 5 ms. We analyze data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and place a 5$\sigma$ upper limit on the 10--100 keV fluence of $4\times10^{-9}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ ($5\times10^{47}$ erg at the distance of FRB 121102) for gamma-ray bursts at the time of radio bursts. We also present a deep search for a persistent X-ray source using all of the X-ray observations taken to date and place a 5$\sigma$ upper limit on the 0.5--10 keV flux of $4\times10^{-15}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ ($3\times10^{41}$ erg~s$^{-1}$ at the distance of FRB 121102). We discuss these non-detections in the context of the host environment of FRB 121102 and of possible sources of fast radio bursts in general.
  • We present results of the coordinated observing campaign that made the first subarcsecond localization of a Fast Radio Burst, FRB 121102. During this campaign, we made the first simultaneous detection of an FRB burst by multiple telescopes: the VLA at 3 GHz and the Arecibo Observatory at 1.4 GHz. Of the nine bursts detected by the Very Large Array at 3 GHz, four had simultaneous observing coverage at other observatories. We use multi-observatory constraints and modeling of bursts seen only at 3 GHz to confirm earlier results showing that burst spectra are not well modeled by a power law. We find that burst spectra are characterized by a ~500 MHz envelope and apparent radio energy as high as $10^{40}$ erg. We measure significant changes in the apparent dispersion between bursts that can be attributed to frequency-dependent profiles or some other intrinsic burst structure that adds a systematic error to the estimate of DM by up to 1%. We use FRB 121102 as a prototype of the FRB class to estimate a volumetric birth rate of FRB sources $R_{FRB} \approx 5x10^{-5}/N_r$ Mpc$^{-3}$ yr$^{-1}$, where $N_r$ is the number of bursts per source over its lifetime. This rate is broadly consistent with models of FRBs from young pulsars or magnetars born in superluminous supernovae or long gamma-ray bursts, if the typical FRB repeats on the order of thousands of times during its lifetime.
  • Fast radio bursts are astronomical radio flashes of unknown physical nature with durations of milliseconds. Their dispersive arrival times suggest an extragalactic origin and imply radio luminosities orders of magnitude larger than any other kind of known short-duration radio transient. Thus far, all FRBs have been detected with large single-dish telescopes with arcminute localizations, and attempts to identify their counterparts (source or host galaxy) have relied on contemporaneous variability of field sources or the presence of peculiar field stars or galaxies. These attempts have not resulted in an unambiguous association with a host or multi-wavelength counterpart. Here we report the sub-arcsecond localization of FRB 121102, the only known repeating burst source, using high-time-resolution radio interferometric observations that directly image the bursts themselves. Our precise localization reveals that FRB 121102 originates within 100 mas of a faint 180 uJy persistent radio source with a continuum spectrum that is consistent with non-thermal emission, and a faint (25th magnitude) optical counterpart. The flux density of the persistent radio source varies by tens of percent on day timescales, and very long baseline radio interferometry yields an angular size less than 1.7 mas. Our observations are inconsistent with the fast radio burst having a Galactic origin or its source being located within a prominent star-forming galaxy. Instead, the source appears to be co-located with a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus or a previously unknown type of extragalactic source. [Truncated] If other fast radio bursts have similarly faint radio and optical counterparts, our findings imply that direct sub-arcsecond localizations of FRBs may be the only way to provide reliable associations.
  • The eclipses of certain types of binary millisecond pulsars (i.e. `black widows' and `redbacks') are often studied using high-time-resolution, `beamformed' radio observations. However, they may also be detected in images generated from interferometric data. As part of a larger imaging project to characterize the variable and transient sky at radio frequencies <200 MHz, we have blindly detected the redback system PSR J2215+5135 as a variable source of interest with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR). Using observations with cadences of 2 weeks - 6 months, we find preliminary evidence that the eclipse duration is frequency dependent ($\propto \nu^{-0.4}$), such that the pulsar is eclipsed for longer at lower frequencies, in broad agreement with beamformed studies of other similar sources. Furthermore, the detection of the eclipses in imaging data suggests an eclipsing medium that absorbs the pulsed emission, rather than scattering it. Our study is also a demonstration of the prospects of finding pulsars in wide-field imaging surveys with the current generation of low-frequency radio telescopes.
  • We report on the results of a search for radio transients between 115 and 190\,MHz with the LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR). Four fields have been monitored with cadences between 15 minutes and several months. A total of 151 images were obtained, giving a total survey area of 2275 deg$^2$. We analysed our data using standard LOFAR tools and searched for radio transients using the LOFAR Transients Pipeline (TraP). No credible radio transient candidate has been detected; however, we are able to set upper limits on the surface density of radio transient sources at low radio frequencies. We also show that low-frequency radio surveys are more sensitive to steep-spectrum coherent transient sources than GHz radio surveys. We used two new statistical methods to determine the upper limits on the transient surface density. One is free of assumptions on the flux distribution of the sources, while the other assumes a power-law distribution in flux and sets more stringent constraints on the transient surface density. Both of these methods provide better constraints than the approach used in previous works. The best value for the upper limit we can set for the transient surface density, using the method assuming a power-law flux distribution, is 1.3$\cdot$10$^{-3}$ deg$^{-2}$ for transients brighter than 0.3 Jy with a time-scale of 15 min, at a frequency of 150 MHz. We also calculated for the first time upper limits for the transient surface density for transients of different time-scales. We find that the results can differ by orders of magnitude from previously reported, simplified estimates.
  • Nov. 30, 2015 astro-ph.IM, astro-ph.HE
    We present the results of a four-month campaign searching for low-frequency radio transients near the North Celestial Pole with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR), as part of the Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS). The data were recorded between 2011 December and 2012 April and comprised 2149 11-minute snapshots, each covering 175 deg^2. We have found one convincing candidate astrophysical transient, with a duration of a few minutes and a flux density at 60 MHz of 15-25 Jy. The transient does not repeat and has no obvious optical or high-energy counterpart, as a result of which its nature is unclear. The detection of this event implies a transient rate at 60 MHz of 3.9 (+14.7, -3.7) x 10^-4 day^-1 deg^-2, and a transient surface density of 1.5 x 10^-5 deg^-2, at a 7.9-Jy limiting flux density and ~10-minute time-scale. The campaign data were also searched for transients at a range of other time-scales, from 0.5 to 297 min, which allowed us to place a range of limits on transient rates at 60 MHz as a function of observation duration.
  • We demonstrate a signal processing concept for imaging the sky at millisecond rates with radio interferometers. The "Pocket Correlator" (PoCo) correlates the signals from multiple elements of a radio interferometer fast enough to image brief, dispersed pulses. By the nature of interferometry, a millisecond correlator functions like a large, single-dish telescope, but with improved survey speed, spatial localization, calibration, and interference rejection. To test the concept, we installed PoCo at the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) to search for dispersed pulses from the Crab pulsar, B0329+54, and M31 using total-power, visibility-based, and image-plane techniques. In 1.7 hours of observing, PoCo detected 191 giant pulses from the Crab pulsar brighter than a typical 5 sigma sensitivity limit of 60 Jy over pulse widths of 3 milliseconds. Roughly 40% of pulses from pulsar B0329+54 were detected by using novel visibility-based techniques. Observations of M31 constrain the rate of pulses brighter than 190 Jy in a three degree region surrounding the galaxy to <4.3/hr. We calculate the computational demand of various visibility-based pulse search algorithms and demonstrate how compute clusters can help meet this demand. Larger implementations of the fast imaging concept will conduct blind searches for millisecond pulses in our Galaxy and beyond, providing a valuable probe of the interstellar/intergalactic media, discovering new kinds of radio transients, and localizing them to constrain models of their origin.
  • We have observed 37 bright, polarized radio sources with the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) to present a novel analysis of their Faraday rotation properties. Each source was observed during the commissioning phase with 2 to 4 100-MHz bands at frequencies ranging from 1 to 2 GHz. These observations demonstrate how the continuous frequency coverage of the ATA's log-periodic receiver can be applied to the study of Faraday rotation measures (RMs). We use RM synthesis to show that wide-bandwidth data can find multiple RM components toward a single source. Roughly a quarter of the sources studied have extra RM components with high confidence (brighter than ~40 mJy), when observing with a RM resolution of roughly 100 rad/m2. These extra components contribute 10%-70% of the total polarized flux. This is the first time multiple RM components have been identified in a large sample of point sources. For our observing configuration, these extra RM components bias the measurement of the peak RM by 10-15 rad/m2 ; more generally, the peak RM cannot be determined more precisely than the RM beam size. Comparing our 1-2 GHz RM spectra to VLBA polarimetric maps shows both techniques can identify complicated Faraday structures in the sources. However, the RM values and fractional polarization are generally smaller at lower frequencies than in the higher-frequency VLBA maps. With a few exceptions, the RMs from this work are consistent with that of earlier, narrow-bandwidth, all-sky surveys. This work also describes the polarimetry calibration procedure and that on-axis ATA observations of linear polarization can be calibrated to an accuracy of 0.2% of Stokes I. Future research directions include studying the time-dependent RM structure in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) and enabling accurate, wide-area RM surveys to test models of Galactic and extragalactic magnetic fields.
  • The Galactic center (GC) lobe is a degree-tall shell of gas that spans the central degree of our Galaxy. It has been cited as evidence for a mass outflow from our GC region, which has inspired diverse models for its origin. However, most work has focused on the morphology of the GC lobe, which has made it difficult to draw strong conclusions about its nature. Here, I present a coherent, multiwavelength analysis of new and archival observations of the GC lobe. Radio continuum emission shows that the GC lobe has a magnetized layer with a diameter of 110 pc and an equipartition field strength ranging from 40 to 100 $\mu$G. Recombination line emission traces an ionized shell nested within the radio continuum with diameter of 80 pc and height 165 pc. Mid-infrared maps at 8 and 15 $\mu$m show that the GC lobe has a third layer of warm dust and PAH-emission that surrounds the radio continuum shell with a diameter of 130 pc. Assuming adiabatic expansion of the gas in the GC lobe, its formation required an energy input of about $5\times10^{52}$ ergs. I compare the physical conditions of the GC lobe to several models and find best agreement with the canonical starburst outflow model. The formation of the GC lobe is consistent with the currently observed pressure and star formation rate in the central tens of parsecs of our Galaxy. Outflows of this scale are more typical of dwarf galaxies and would not be easily detected in nearby spiral galaxies. Thus, the existence of such an outflow in our own Galaxy may indicate that it is relatively common phenomenon in the nuclei of spiral galaxies. (Abridged)
  • We have studied the correlation between 2357 Chandra X-ray point sources in a 40 x 40 parsec field and ~20,000 infrared sources we observed in the corresponding subset of our 2 x 1.4 degree Spitzer/IRAC Galactic Center Survey at 3.6-8.0 um, using various spatial and X-ray hardness thresholds. The correlation was determined for source separations of less than 0.5", 1" or 2". Only the soft X-ray sources show any correlation with infrared point sources on these scales, and that correlation is very weak. The upper limit on hard X-ray sources that have infrared counterparts is <1.7% (3 sigma). However, because of the confusion limit of the IR catalog, we only detect IR sources with absolute magnitudes < ~1. As a result, a stronger correlation with fainter sources cannot be ruled out. Only one compact infrared source, IRS 13, coincides with any of the dozen prominent X-ray emission features in the 3 x 3 parsec region centered on Sgr A*, and the diffuse X-ray and infrared emission around Sgr A* seems to be anti-correlated on a few-arcsecond scale. We compare our results with previous identifications of near-infrared companions to Chandra X-ray sources.
  • We describe the results of a radio continuum survey of the central 4x1deg with the 100 m Green Bank Telescope (GBT) at wavelengths of 3.5, 6, 20, and 90 cm. The 3.5 and 6 cm surveys are the most sensitive and highest resolution single dish surveys made of the central degrees of our Galaxy. We present catalogs of compact and extended sources in the central four degrees of our Galaxy, including detailed spectral index studies of all sources. The analysis covers star-forming regions such as Sgr B and Sgr C where we find evidence of a mixture of thermal and nonthermal emission. The analysis quantifies the relative contribution of thermal and nonthermal processes to the radio continuum flux density toward the GC region. In the central 4x1deg of the GC, the thermal and nonthermal flux fractions for all compact and diffuse sources are 28%/72% at 3.5 cm and 19%/81% at 6 cm. The total flux densities from these sources are 783+-52 Jy and 1063+-93 Jy at 3.5 and 6 cm, respectively, excluding the contribution of Galactic synchrotron emission.