• We present the results of a survey for intervening 21cm HI absorption in a sample of 10 nearby, gas-rich galaxies selected from the HI Parkes All-Sky Survey (HIPASS). This follows the six HIPASS galaxies searched in previous work and completes our full sample. In this paper we searched for absorption along 17 sightlines with impact parameters between 6 and 46 kpc, making one new detection. We also obtained simultaneous HI emission-line data, allowing us to directly relate the absorption-line detection rate to the HI distribution. From this we find the majority of the non-detections in the current sample are because sightline does not intersect the HI disc of the galaxy at sufficiently high column density, but that source structure is also an important factor. The detected absorption-line arises in the galaxy NGC 5156 ($z = 0.01$) at an impact parameter of 19 kpc. The line is deep and narrow with an integrated optical depth of 0.82 km s$^{-1}$. High resolution Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) images at 5 and 8 GHz reveal that the background source is resolved into two components with a separation of 2.6 arcsec (500 pc at the redshift of the galaxy), with the absorption likely occurring against a single component. We estimate that the ratio of the spin temperature and covering factor, $T_{\mathrm{S}}/f$, is approximately 950 K in the outer disc of NGC 5156, but further observations using VLBI would allow us to accurately measure the covering factor and spin temperature of the gas.
  • We use observations from the Boolardy Engineering Test Array (BETA) of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope to search for transient radio sources in the field around the intermittent pulsar PSR J1107-5907. The pulsar is thought to switch between an "off" state in which no emission is detectable, a weak state and a strong state. We ran three independent transient detection pipelines on two-minute snapshot images from a 13 hour BETA observation in order to 1) study the emission from the pulsar, 2) search for other transient emission from elsewhere in the image and 3) to compare the results from the different transient detection pipelines. The pulsar was easily detected as a transient source and, over the course of the observations, it switched into the strong state three times giving a typical timescale between the strong emission states of 3.7 hours. After the first switch it remained in the strong state for almost 40 minutes. The other strong states lasted less than 4 minutes. The second state change was confirmed using observations with the Parkes radio telescope. No other transient events were found and we place constraints on the surface density of such events on these timescales. The high sensitivity Parkes observations enabled us to detect individual bright pulses during the weak state and to study the strong state over a wide observing band. We conclude by showing that future transient surveys with ASKAP will have the potential to probe the intermittent pulsar population.
  • We have conducted the first parallax and proper motion measurements of 6.7 GHz methanol maser emission using the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA). The parallax of G339.884$-$1.259 measured from five epochs of observations is 0.48$\pm $0.08 mas, corresponding to a distance of $2.1^{+0.4}_{-0.3}$ kpc, placing it in the Scutum spiral arm. This is consistent (within the combined uncertainty) with the kinematic distance estimate for this source at 2.5$\pm $0.5 kpc using the latest Solar and Galactic rotation parameters. We find from the Lyman continuum photon flux that the embedded core of the young star is of spectral type B1, demonstrating that luminous 6.7 GHz methanol masers can be associated with high-mass stars towards the lower end of the mass range.
  • We report a limit on the ultra-high-energy neutrino flux based on a non-detection of radio pulses from neutrino-initiated particle cascades in the Moon, in observations with the Parkes radio telescope undertaken as part of the LUNASKA project. Due to the improved sensitivity of these observations, which had an effective duration of 127 hours and a frequency range of 1.2-1.5 GHz, this limit extends to lower neutrino energies than those from previous lunar radio experiments, with a detection threshold below 10^20 eV. The calculation of our limit allows for the possibility of lunar-origin pulses being misidentified as local radio interference, and includes the effect of small-scale lunar surface roughness. The targeting strategy of the observations also allows us to place a directional limit on the neutrino flux from the nearby radio galaxy Centaurus A.
  • We describe an experiment using the Parkes radio telescope in the 1.2-1.5 GHz frequency range as part of the LUNASKA project, to search for nanosecond-scale pulses from particle cascades in the Moon, which may be triggered by ultra-high-energy astroparticles. Through the combination of a highly sensitive multi-beam radio receiver, a purpose-built backend and sophisticated signal-processing techniques, we achieve sensitivity to radio pulses with a threshold electric field strength of 0.0053 $\mu$V/m/MHz, lower than previous experiments by a factor of three. We observe no pulses in excess of this threshold in observations with an effective duration of 127 hours. The techniques we employ, including compensating for the phase, dispersion and spectrum of the expected pulse, are relevant for future lunar radio experiments.
  • Full polarization measurements of 1665 and 1667-MHz OH masers at 261 sites of massive star formation have been made with the Parkes radio telescope. Here we present the resulting spectra for 157 southern sources, complementing our previously published 104 northerly sources. For most sites, these are the first measurements of linear polarization, with good spectral resolution and complete velocity coverage. Our spectra exhibit the well-known predominance of highly circularly polarized features, interpreted as $\sigma$ components of Zeeman patterns. Focusing on the generally weaker and rarer linear polarization, we found three examples of likely full Zeeman triplets (a linearly polarized $\pi$ component, straddled in velocity by $\sigma$ components), adding to the solitary example previously reported. We also identify 40 examples of likely isolated $\pi$ components, contradicting past beliefs that $\pi$ components might be extremely rare. These were recognised at 20 sites where a feature with high linear polarization on one transition is accompanied on the other transition by a matching feature, at the same velocity and also with significant linear polarization. Large velocity ranges are rare, but we find eight exceeding 25 km/s, some of them indicating high velocity blue-shifted outflows. Variability was investigated on timescales of one year and over several decades. More than 20 sites (of 200) show high variability (intensity changes by factors of four or more) in some prominent features. Highly stable sites are extremely rare.
  • Full polarization measurements of 1665 and 1667-MHz OH masers at sites of massive star formation have been made with the Parkes 64-m radio telescope. Here we present the resulting spectra for 104 northerly sources. For more than 20 masers we made new measurements with the ATCA (which also revealed several hitherto unreported masers), in most cases yielding arcsecond precision to match the majority of sites. Position improvements assist in distinguishing OH masers with accompanying methanol masers from those without (thought to be at a later stage of evolution). There was no existing linear polarization information at many sites, and spectral resolution was sometimes poor, or velocity coverage incomplete. These inadequacies are addressed by the present Parkes spectra. The whole OH maser sample exhibit the well-known predominance of highly circularly polarized features. We find that linear polarization is also common, but usually much weaker, and we highlight the rare cases of very pronounced linear polarization that can extend to 100 per cent. Unusually large velocity ranges of at least 25 km/s are present at seven sites. Our spectra measurements for most sources are at two epochs spaced by nearly one year, and reveal high stability at most sites, and marked variability (more than factors of two in the strongest feature) at only five sites. The spectra also provide a valuable reference for longer term variability, with high stability evident over the past decades at 10 sites and marked variability for four of the sample. Future systematic monitoring of these variables may uncover further examples of periodicity, a phenomenon so far recognised in only one source.
  • We present the results of our radio observational campaign on GRB 100418a, for which we used the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), Very Large Array (VLA) and the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). GRB 100418a was a peculiar GRB with unusual X-ray and optical afterglow profiles featuring a plateau phase with a very shallow rise. This observed plateau phase was believed to be due to a continued energy injection mechanism which powered the forward shock, giving rise to an unusual and long-lasting afterglow. The radio afterglow of GRB 100418a was detectable several weeks after the prompt emission. We conducted long-term monitoring observations of the afterglow and attempted to test the energy injection model advocating that the continuous energy injection is due to shells of material moving at a wide range of Lorentz factors. We obtained an upper limit of $\gamma$ $<$ 7 for the expansion rate of the GRB 100418a radio afterglow, indicating that the range-of-Lorentz factor model could only be applicable for relatively slow moving ejecta. A preferred explanation could be that continued activity of the central engine may have powered the long-lasting afterglow.
  • The Moon is used as a target volume for ultra-high energy neutrino searches with terrestrial radio telescopes. The LUNASKA project has conducted observations with the Parkes and ATCA telescopes; and, most recently, with both of them in combination. We present an analysis of the data obtained from these searches, including validation and calibration results for the Parkes-ATCA experiment, as well as a summary of prospects for future observations.
  • The H2O Southern Galactic Plane Survey (HOPS) has mapped a 100 degree strip of the Galactic plane (-70deg > l > 30deg, |b| < 0.5deg) using the 22-m Mopra antenna at 12-mm wavelengths. Observations were conducted in on-the-fly mode using the Mopra spectrometer (MOPS), targeting water masers, thermal molecular emission and radio-recombination lines. Foremost among the thermal lines are the 23 GHz transitions of NH3 J,K = (1,1) and (2,2), which trace the densest parts of molecular clouds (n > 10^4 cm^{-3}). In this paper we present the NH3 (1,1) and (2,2) data, which have a resolution of 2 arcmin and cover a velocity range of +/-200 km/s. The median sensitivity of the NH3 data-cubes is sigma_Tmb = 0.20 +/1 0.06 K. For the (1,1) transition this sensitivity equates to a 3.2 kpc distance limit for detecting a 20 K, 400 Msun cloud at the 5-sigma level. Similar clouds of mass 5,000 Msun would be detected as far as the Galactic centre, while 30,000 Msun clouds would be seen across the Galaxy. We have developed an automatic emission finding procedure based on the ATNF DUCHAMP software and have used it to create a new catalogue of 669 dense molecular clouds. The catalogue is 100 percent complete at the 5-sigma detection limit (Tmb = 1.0 K). A preliminary analysis of the ensemble cloud properties suggest that the near kinematic distances are favoured. The cloud positions are consistent with current models of the Galaxy containing a long bar. Combined with other Galactic plane surveys this new molecular-line dataset constitutes a key tool for examining Galactic structure and evolution. Data-cubes, spectra and catalogues are available to the community via the HOPS website.
  • The most sensitive method for detecting neutrinos at the very highest energies is the lunar Cherenkov technique, which employs the Moon as a target volume, using conventional radio telescopes to monitor it for nanosecond-scale pulses of Cherenkov radiation from particle cascades in its regolith. Multiple-antenna radio telescopes are difficult to effectively combine into a single detector for this purpose, while single antennas are more susceptible to false events from radio interference, which must be reliably excluded for a credible detection to be made. We describe our progress in excluding such interference in our observations with the single-antenna Parkes radio telescope, and our most recent experiment (taking place the week before the ICRC) using it in conjunction with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, exploiting the advantages of both types of telescope.
  • We present first results of the H_2O Southern Galactic Plane Survey (HOPS), using the Mopra radiotelescope with a broad band backend and a beam size of about 2'. We have observed 100 square degrees of the southern Galactic plane at 12mm (19.5 to 27.5GHz), including spectral line emission from water masers, multiple metastable transitions of ammonia, cyanoacetylene, methanol and radio recombination lines. In this paper, we report on the characteristics of the survey and water maser emission. We find 540 water masers, of which 334 are new detections. The strongest maser is 3933Jy and the weakest is 0.7Jy, with 62 masers over 100Jy. In 14 maser sites, the spread in velocity of the water maser emission exceeds 100km/s. In one region, the water maser velocities are separated by 351.3km/s. The rms noise levels are typically between 1-2Jy, with 95% of the survey under 2Jy. We estimate completeness limits of 98% at around 8.4Jy and 50% at around 5.5Jy. We estimate that there are between 800 and 1500 water masers in the Galaxy that are detectable in a survey with similar completeness limits to HOPS. We report possible masers in NH_3 (11,9) and (8,6) emission towards G19.61-0.23 and in the NH_3 (3,3) line towards G23.33-0.30.
  • We report on VLBI, as well as VLA radio observations of the Type Ib/c supernova 2009bb. The high radio luminosity of this supernova seems to require relativistic outflow, implying that the early radio emission was "engine-driven", that is driven by collimated outflow from a compact object, even though no gamma-ray emission was seen. The radio light curve shows a general decline, with a "bump" near t = 52 d, seen most prominently at 5 GHz. The lightcurve bump could be either engine-driven, or it might represent the turn-on of the normal radio emission from a supernova, driven by interaction with the CSM rather than by the engine. We undertook VLBI observations to resolve SN 2009bb's relativistic outflow. Our observations constrain the angular outer radius at an age of 85 d to be <0.64 mas, corresponding to <4 x 10^17 cm and an average apparent expansion speed of <1.74c. This result is consistent with the moderately relativistic ejecta speeds implied by the radio luminosity and spectrum.
  • We have conducted a Galactic plane survey of methanol masers at 6668 MHz using a 7-beam receiver on the Parkes telescope. Here we present results from the first part, which provides sensitive unbiased coverage of a large region around the Galactic Centre. Details are given for 183 methanol maser sites in the longitude range 345$^{\circ}$ through the Galactic Centre to 6$^{\circ}$. Within 6$^{\circ}$ of the Centre, we found 88 maser sites, of which more than half (48) are new discoveries. The masers are confined to a narrow Galactic latitude range, indicative of many sources at the Galactic Centre distance and beyond, and confined to a thin disk population; there is no high latitude population that might be ascribed to the Galactic Bulge. Within 2$^{\circ}$ of the Galactic Centre the maser velocities all lie between -60 and +77 \kms, a range much smaller than the 540 \kms range observed in CO. Elsewhere, the maser with highest positive velocity (+107 \kms) occurs, surprisingly, near longitude 355$^{\circ}$ and is probably attributable to the Galactic bar. The maser with the most negative velocity (-127 \kms) is near longitude 346$^{\circ}$, within the longitude-velocity locus of the near side of the `3-kpc arm'. It has the most extreme velocity of a clear population of masers associated with the near and far sides of the 3-kpc arm. Closer to the Galactic Centre the maser space density is generally low, except within 0.25 kpc of the Centre itself, the `Galactic Centre Zone', where it is 50 times higher, which is hinted at by the longitude distribution, and confirmed by the unusual velocities.
  • Context: To investigate the joint evolution of active galactic nuclei and star formation in the Universe. Aims: In the 1.4 GHz survey with the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the Chandra Deep Field South and the European Large Area ISO Survey - S1 we have identified a class of objects which are strong in the radio but have no detectable infrared and optical counterparts. This class has been called Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS. 53 sources out of 2002 have been classified as IFRS. It is not known what these objects are. Methods: To address the many possible explanations as to what the nature of these objects is we have observed four sources with the Australian Long Baseline Array. Results: We have detected and imaged one of the four sources observed. Assuming that the source is at a high redshift, we find its properties in agreement with properties of Compact Steep Spectrum sources. However, due to the lack of optical and infrared data the constraints are not particularly strong.
  • A promising method for the detection of UHE neutrinos is the Lunar Cherenkov technique, which utilises Earth-based radio telescopes to detect the coherent Cherenkov radiation emitted when a UHE neutrino interacts in the outer layers of the Moon. The LUNASKA project aims to overcome the technological limitations of past experiments to utilise the next generation of radio telescopes in the search for these elusive particles. To take advantage of broad-bandwidth data from potentially thousands of antennas requires advances in signal processing technology. Here we describe recent developments in this field and their application in the search for UHE neutrinos, from a preliminary experiment using the first stage of an upgrade to the Australia Telescope Compact Array, to possibilities for fully utilising the completed Square Kilometre Array. We also explore a new real time technique for characterising ionospheric pulse dispersion which specifically measures ionospheric electron content that is line of sight to the moon.
  • We present spatially resolved mid-infrared spectroscopy of the class I/flat-spectrum protostellar binary system SVS20 in the Serpens cloud core. The spectra were obtained with the mid-infrared instrument T-ReCS on Gemini-South. SVS20-South, the more luminous of the two sources, exhibits a mid-infrared emission spectrum peaking near 11.3 \micron, while SVS20-North exhibits a shallow amorphous silicate absorption spectrum with a peak optical depth of $\tau \sim 0.3$. After removal of the the line-of-sight extinction by the molecular common envelope, the ``protostar-only'' spectra are found to be dominated by strong amorphous olivine emission peaking near 10 \micron. We also find evidence for emission from crystalline forsterite and enstatite associated with both SVS20-S and SVS20-N. The presence of crystalline silicate in such a young binary system indicates that the grain processing found in more evolved HAeBe and T Tauri pre-main sequence stars likely begins at a relatively young evolutionary stage, while mass accretion is still ongoing.
  • We report the cumulative results of five surveys for water maser emission at 1.35 cm wavelength in 131 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and star-forming galaxies, conducted at the Parkes Observatory between 1993 and 1998. We detected one new maser, in the edge-on galaxy IRASF01063-8034, which exhibits a single, about 0.1 Jy spectral feature at 4282+/-6 km/s (heliocentric) with an unusually large 54+/-16 km/s half-power full width. The centroid velocity of the emission increased to 4319.6+/-0.6 km/s (38+/-2 km/s width) over the 13 days between discovery and confirmation of the detection. A similarly broad linewidth and large change in velocity has been noted for the maser in NGC1052, wherein jet activity excites the emission. Neither optical spectroscopy, radio-infrared correlations, nor infrared colors provide compelling evidence of unusual activity in the nucleus of IRASF01063-8034. Since the galaxy appears to be outwardly normal at optical and infrared wavelengths, detection of a water maser therein is unique. The maser emission is evidence that the galaxy harbors an AGN that is probably obscured by the edge-on galactic disk. The detection highlights the possibility that undetected AGNs could be hidden in other relatively nearby galaxies. No other maser emission features have been identified at velocities between 3084 km/s and 6181 km/s.
  • We show that in many methanol maser sources the masers are located in lines, with a velocity gradient along them which suggests that the masers are situated in edge-on circumstellar, or protoplanetary, disks. We present VLBI observations of the methanol maser source G309.92+0.48, in the 12.2 GHz transition, which confirm previous observations that the masers in this source lie along a line. We show that such sources are not only linear in space but, in many cases, also have a linear velocity gradient. We then model these and other data in both the 6.7 GHz and the 12.2 GHz transition from a number of star formation regions, and show that the observed spatial and velocity distribution of methanol masers, and the derived Keplerian masses, are consistent with a circumstellar disk rotating around an OB star. We consider this and other hypotheses, and conclude that about half of these methanol masers are probably located in edge-on circumstellar disks around young stars. This is of particular significance for studies of circumstellar disks because of the detailed velocity information available from the masers.
  • We have used the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) to search for 6.7-GHz methanol maser emission towards 87 galaxies. We chose the target sources using several criteria, including far-IR luminosities and the presence of known OH megamasers. In addition, we searched for methanol masers in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253, making a full spectral-line synthesis image. No emission was detected in any galaxies, with detection limits ranging from 25 mJy to 75 mJy. This is surprising, given the close association of OH and methanol masers in Galactic star-formation regions, and significantly constrains models of OH megamaser emission. This absence of maser emission may be a result of low methanol abundances in molecular clouds in starburst galaxies.