• Accurately measuring the neutron beam polarization of a high flux, large area neutron beam is necessary for many neutron physics experiments. The Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline (FnPB) at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a pulsed neutron beam that was polarized with a supermirror polarizer for the NPDGamma experiment. The polarized neutron beam had a flux of $\sim10^9$ neutrons per second per cm$^2$ and a cross sectional area of 10$\times$12~cm$^2$. The polarization of this neutron beam and the efficiency of a RF neutron spin rotator installed downstream on this beam were measured by neutron transmission through a polarized $^{3}$He neutron spin-filter. The pulsed nature of the SNS enabled us to employ an absolute measurement technique for both quantities which does not depend on accurate knowledge of the phase space of the neutron beam or the $^{3}$He polarization in the spin filter and is therefore of interest for any experiments on slow neutron beams from pulsed neutron sources which require knowledge of the absolute value of the neutron polarization. The polarization and spin-reversal efficiency measured in this work were done for the NPDGamma experiment, which measures the parity violating $\gamma$-ray angular distribution asymmetry with respect to the neutron spin direction in the capture of polarized neutrons on protons. The experimental technique, results, systematic effects, and applications to neutron capture targets are discussed.
  • We investigate the star formation history and the dust attenuation in the galaxy merger Mrk848. Thanks to the multiwavelength photometry from the ultraviolet (UV) to the infrared (IR), and MaNGA's integral field spectroscopy, we are able to study this merger in a detailed way. We divide the whole merger into the core and tail regions, and fit both the optical spectrum and the multi-band spectral energy distribution (SED) to models to obtain the star formation properties for each region respectively. We find that the color excess of stars in the galaxy $E(B-V)_s^{SED}$ measured with the multi-band SED fitting is consistent with that estimated both from the infrared excess (the ratio of IR to UV flux) and from the slope of the UV continuum. Furthermore, the reliability of the $E(B-V)_s^{SED}$ is examined with a set of mock SEDs, showing that the dust attenuation of the stars can be well constrained by the UV-to-IR broadband SED fitting. The dust attenuation obtained from optical continuum $E(B-V)_s^{spec}$ is only about half of $E(B-V)_s^{SED}$. The ratio of the $E(B-V)_s^{spec}$ to the $E(B-V)_g$ obtained from the Balmer decrement is consistent with the local value (around 0.5). The difference between the results from the UV-to-IR data and the optical data is consistent with the picture that younger stellar populations are attenuated by an extra dust component from the birth clouds compared to older stellar populations which are only attenuated by the diffuse dust. Both with the UV-to-IR SED fitting and the spectral fitting, we find that there is a starburst younger than 100~Myr in one of the two core regions, consistent with the scenario that the interaction-induced gas inflow can enhance the star formation in the center of galaxies.
  • Mixed modes have been extensively observed in post-main-sequence stars by the Kepler and CoRoT space missions. The mixture of the p and g modes can be measured by the dimensionless coefficient $q$, the so-called coupling strength factor. In this paper we discuss the utility of the phase shifts $\theta$ from the eigenvalue condition for mixed modes as a tool to characterize dipolar mixed modes from the theoretical as well as the practical point of view. Unlike the coupling strength, whose variation in a given star is very small over the relevant frequency range, the phase shifts vary significantly for different modes. The analysis in terms of $\theta$ can also provide a better understanding of the pressure and gravity radial order for a given mixed mode. Observed frequencies of the Kepler red-giant star KIC 3744043 are used to test the method. The results are very promising.
  • The effect of metallicity on the granulation activity in stars is still poorly understood. Available spectroscopic parameters from the updated APOGEE-\textit{Kepler} catalog, coupled with high-precision photometric observations from NASA's \textit{Kepler} mission spanning more than four years of observation, make oscillating red giant stars in open clusters crucial testbeds. We determine the role of metallicity on the stellar granulation activity by discriminating its effect from that of different stellar properties such as surface gravity, mass, and temperature. We analyze 60 known red giant stars belonging to the open clusters NGC 6791, NGC 6819, and NGC 6811, spanning a metallicity range from [Fe/H] $\simeq -0.09$ to $0.32$. The parameters describing the granulation activity of these stars and their $\nu_\mathrm{max}$, are studied by considering the different masses, metallicities, and stellar evolutionary stages. We derive new scaling relations for the granulation activity, re-calibrate existing ones, and identify the best scaling relations from the available set of observations. We adopted the Bayesian code DIAMONDS for the analysis of the background signal in the Fourier spectra of the stars. We performed a Bayesian parameter estimation and model comparison to test the different model hypotheses proposed in this work and in the literature. Metallicity causes a statistically significant change in the amplitude of the granulation activity, with a dependency stronger than that induced by both stellar mass and surface gravity. We also find that the metallicity has a significant impact on the corresponding time scales of the phenomenon. The effect of metallicity on the time scale is stronger than that of mass. A higher metallicity increases the amplitude of granulation and meso-granulation signals and slows down their characteristic time scales toward longer periods.
  • Millimeter wave (mmWave) communication technologies have recently emerged as an attractive solution to meet the exponentially increasing demand on mobile data traffic. Moreover, ultra dense networks (UDNs) combined with mmWave technology are expected to increase both energy efficiency and spectral efficiency. In this paper, user association and power allocation in mmWave based UDNs is considered with attention to load balance constraints, energy harvesting by base stations, user quality of service requirements, energy efficiency, and cross-tier interference limits. The joint user association and power optimization problem is modeled as a mixed-integer programming problem, which is then transformed into a convex optimization problem by relaxing the user association indicator and solved by Lagrangian dual decomposition. An iterative gradient user association and power allocation algorithm is proposed and shown to converge rapidly to an optimal point. The complexity of the proposed algorithm is analyzed and the effectiveness of the proposed scheme compared with existing methods is verified by simulations.
  • The detection and analysis of oscillations in binary star systems is critical in understanding stellar structure and evolution. This is partly because such systems have the same initial chemical composition and age. Solar-like oscillations have been detected by Kepler in both components of the asteroseismic binary HD 176465. We present an independent modelling of each star in this binary system. Stellar models generated using MESA (Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics) were fitted to both the observed individual frequencies and complementary spectroscopic parameters. The individual theoretical oscillation frequencies for the corresponding stellar models were obtained using GYRE as the pulsation code. A Bayesian approach was applied to find the probability distribution functions of the stellar parameters using AIMS (Asteroseismic Inference on a Massive Scale) as the optimisation code. The ages of HD 176465 A and HD 176465 B were found to be 2.81 $\pm$ 0.48 Gyr and 2.52 $\pm$ 0.80 Gyr, respectively. These results are in agreement when compared to previous studies carried out using other asteroseismic modelling techniques and gyrochronology.
  • We investigated a possible use of the magnonic interferometric switches in multi-valued logic circuits. The switch is a three-terminal device consisting of two spin channels where input, control, and output signals are spin waves. Signal modulation is achieved via the interference between the source and gate spin waves. We report experimental data on a micrometer scale prototype based on Y3Fe2(FeO4)3 structure. The output characteristics are measured at different angles of the bias magnetic field. The On/Off ratio of the prototype exceeds 36 dB at room temperature. Experimental data is complemented by the theoretical analysis and the results of micro magnetic simulations showing spin wave propagation in a micrometer size magnetic junction. We also present the results of numerical modeling illustrating the operation of a nanometer-size switch consisting of just 20 spins in the source-drain channel. The utilization of spin wave interference as a switching mechanism makes it possible to build nanometer-scale logic gates, and minimize energy per operation, which is limited only by the noise margin. The utilization of phase in addition to amplitude for information encoding offers an innovative route towards multi-state logic circuits. We describe possible implementation of the three-value logic circuits based on the magnonic interferometric switches. The advantages and shortcomings inherent in interferometric switches are also discussed.
  • We have demonstrated selective gas sensing with molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) thin films transistors capped with a thin layer of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The resistance change was used as a sensing parameter to detect chemical vapors such as ethanol, acetonitrile, toluene, chloroform and methanol. It was found that h-BN dielectric passivation layer does not prevent gas detection via changes in the source-drain current in the active MoS2 thin film channel. The use of h-BN cap layers (thickness H=10 nm) in the design of MoS2 thin film gas sensors improves device stability and prevents device degradation due to environmental and chemical exposure. The obtained results are important for applications of van der Waals materials in chemical and biological sensing.
  • We report on the transport and low-frequency noise measurements of MoS2 thin-film transistors with "thin" (2-3 atomic layers) and "thick" (15-18 atomic layers) channels. The back-gated transistors made with the relatively thick MoS2 channels have advantages of the higher electron mobility and lower noise level. The normalized noise spectral density of the low-frequency 1/f noise in "thick" MoS2 transistors is of the same level as that in graphene. The MoS2 transistors with the atomically thin channels have substantially higher noise levels. It was established that, unlike in graphene devices, the noise characteristics of MoS2 transistors with "thick" channels (15-18 atomic planes) could be described by the McWhorter model. Our results indicate that the channel thickness optimization is crucial for practical applications of MoS2 thin-film transistors.
  • The measurements of the high - temperature current - voltage characteristics of MoS2 thin - film transistors show that the devices remain functional to temperatures of at least as high as 500 K. The temperature increase results in decreased threshold voltage and mobility. The comparison of the DC and pulse measurements shows that the DC sub - linear and super - linear output characteristics of MoS2 thin - films devices result from the Joule heating and the interplay of the threshold voltage and mobility temperature dependences. At temperatures above 450 K, an intriguing phenomenon of the "memory step" - a kink in the drain current - occurs at zero gate voltage irrespective of the threshold voltage value. The memory step effect was attributed to the slow relaxation processes in thin films similar to those in graphene and electron glasses. The obtained results suggest new applications for MoS2 thin - film transistors in extreme - temperature electronics and sensors.
  • We demonstrated selective gas sensing with MoS2 thin-film transistors using the change in the channel conductance, characteristic transient time and low-frequency current fluctuations as the sensing parameters. The back-gated MoS2 thin-film field-effect transistors were fabricated on Si/SiO2 substrates and intentionally aged for a month to verify reliability and achieve better current stability. The same devices with the channel covered by 10 nm of Al2O3 were used as reference samples. The exposure to ethanol, acetonitrile, toluene, chloroform, and methanol vapors results in drastic changes in the source-drain current. The current can increase or decrease by more than two-orders of magnitude depending on the analyte. The reference devices with coated channel did not show any response. It was established that transient time of the current change and the normalized spectral density of the low-frequency current fluctuations can be used as additional sensing parameters for selective gas detection with thin-film MoS2 transistors.
  • High-precision space observations, such as made by the \kepler\ and \corot\ missions, allow us to detect mixed modes for $l = 1$ modes in their high signal-to-noise photometry data. By means of asteroseismology, the inner structure of red giant (RG) stars is revealed the first time with the help of mixed modes. We analyse these mixed modes of a 1.3 M$_{\sun}$ RG model theoretically from the approximate asymptotic descriptions of oscillations. While fitting observed frequencies with the eigenvalue condition for mixed modes, a good estimate of period spacing and coupling strength is also acquired for more evolved models. We show that the behaviour of the mode inertia in a given mode varies dramatically when the coupling is strong. An approximation of period spacings is also obtained from the asymptotic dispersion relation, which provides a good estimate of the coupling strength as well as period spacing when g-mode-like mixed modes are sufficiently dense. By comparing the theoretical coupling strength from the integral expression with the ones from fitting methods, we confirmed that the theoretical asymptotic equation is problematic in the evanescent region due to the potential singularities as well as the use of the Cowling approximation.
  • The nonlinear spin-dependent transport properties in zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) edge doped by an atom of group III and V elements are studied systematically using density functional theory combined with non-equilibrium Greens functions. The dopant type, acceptor or donor, and the geometrical symmetry, odd or even, are found critical in determining the spin polarization of the current and the current-voltage characteristics. For ZGNRs substitutionally doped on the lower-side edge, the down (up) spin current dominates in odd-(even-)width ZGNRs under a bias voltage around 1V. Remarkably, in even-width ZGNRs, doped by group III elements (B and Al), negative differential resistance (NDR) occurs only for down spins. The bias range of the spin NDR increases with the width of ZGNRs. The clear spin NDR is not observed in any odd-width ZGNRs nor in even-width ZGNRs doped by group V elements (N, and P). This peculiar spin NDR of edge doped ZGNRs suggests potential applications in spintronics.
  • We report the fabrication and performance of all-metallic three-terminal devices with tantalum diselenide thin-film conducting channels. For this proof-of-concept demonstration, the layers of 2H-TaSe2 were exfoliated mechanically from single crystals grown by the chemical vapor transport method. Devices with nanometer-scale thicknesses exhibit strongly non-linear current-voltage characteristics, unusual optical response, and electrical gating at room temperature. We have found that the drain-source current in thin-film 2H-TaSe2-Ti/Au devices reproducibly shows an abrupt transition from a highly resistive to a conductive state, with the threshold tunable via the gate voltage. Such current-voltage characteristics can be used in principle for implementing radiation-hard all-metallic logic circuits. These results may open new application space for thin films of van der Waals materials.
  • We report on the phonon and thermal properties of thin films of tantalum diselenide (2H-TaSe2) obtained via the graphene-like mechanical exfoliation of crystals grown by chemical vapor transport. The ratio of the intensities of the Raman peak from the Si substrate and the E2g peak of TaSe2 presents a convenient metric for quantifying film thickness. The temperature coefficients for two main Raman peaks, A1g and E2g, are -0.013 and -0.0097 cm-1/oC, respectively. The Raman optothermal measurements indicate that the room temperature thermal conductivity in these films decreases from its bulk value of ~16 W/mK to ~9 W/mK in 45-nm thick films. The measurement of electrical resistivity of the field-effect devices with TaSe2 channels indicates that heat conduction is dominated by acoustic phonons in these van der Waals films. The scaling of thermal conductivity with the film thickness suggests that the phonon scattering from the film boundaries is substantial despite the sharp interfaces of the mechanically cleaved samples. These results are important for understanding the thermal properties of thin films exfoliated from TaSe2 and other metal dichalcogenides, as well as for evaluating self-heating effects in devices made from such materials.
  • We propose the addition of scintillator to the existing MiniBooNE detector to allow a test of the neutral-current/charged-current (NC/CC) nature of the MiniBooNE low-energy excess. Scintillator will enable the reconstruction of 2.2 MeV $\gamma$s from neutron-capture on protons following neutrino interactions. Low-energy CC interactions where the oscillation excess is observed should have associated neutrons with less than a 10% probability. This is in contrast to the NC backgrounds that should have associated neutrons in approximately 50% of events. We will measure these neutron fractions with $\nu_\mu$ CC and NC events to eliminate that systematic uncertainty. This neutron-fraction measurement requires $6.5\times10^{20}$ protons on target delivered to MiniBooNE with scintillator added in order to increase the significance of an oscillation excess to over $5\sigma$. This new phase of MiniBooNE will also enable additional important studies such as the spin structure of nucleon ($\Delta s$) via NC elastic scattering, a low-energy measurement of the neutrino flux via $\numu ^{12}C \rightarrow \mu^{-} ^{12}N_\textrm{g.s.}$ scattering, and a test of the quasielastic assumption in neutrino energy reconstruction. These topics will yield important, highly-cited results over the next 5 years for a modest cost, and will help to train Ph.D. students and postdocs. This enterprise offers complementary information to that from the upcoming liquid Argon based MicroBooNE experiment. In addition, MicroBooNE is scheduled to receive neutrinos in early 2014, and there is minimal additional cost to also deliver beam to MiniBooNE.
  • This paper proposes a unique discovery signal as an enabler of peer-to-peer (P2P) communication which overlays a cellular network and shares its resources. Applying P2P communication to cellular network has two key issues: 1. Conventional ad hoc P2P connections may be unstable since stringent resource and interference coordination is usually difficult to achieve for ad hoc P2P communications; 2. The large overhead required by P2P communication may offset its gain. We solve these two issues by using a special discovery signal to aid cellular network-supervised resource sharing and interference management between cellular and P2P connections. The discovery signal, which facilitates efficient neighbor discovery in a cellular system, consists of un-modulated tones transmitted on a sequence of OFDM symbols. This discovery signal not only possesses the properties of high power efficiency, high interference tolerance, and freedom from near-far effects, but also has minimal overhead. A practical discovery-signal-based P2P in an OFDMA cellular system is also proposed. Numerical results are presented which show the potential of improving local service and edge device performance in a cellular network.
  • A proposal submitted to the FNAL PAC is described to search for light sub-GeV WIMP dark matter at MiniBooNE. The possibility to steer the beam past the target and into an absorber leads to a significant reduction in neutrino background, allowing for a sensitive search for elastic scattering of WIMPs off nucleons or electrons in the detector. Dark matter models involving a vector mediator can be probed in a parameter region consistent with the required thermal relic density, and which overlaps the region in which these models can resolve the muon g-2 discrepancy. Estimates of signal significance are presented for various operational modes and parameter points. The experimental approach outlined for applying MiniBooNE to a light WIMP search may also be applicable to other neutrino facilities.
  • We present preliminary results on modelling KIC 7693833, the so far most metal-poor red-giant star observed by {\it Kepler}. From time series spanning several months, global oscillation parameters and individual frequencies were obtained and compared to theoretical calculations. Evolution models are calculated taking into account spectroscopic and asteroseismic constraints. The oscillation frequencies of the models were computed and compared to the {\it Kepler} data. In the range of mass computed, there is no preferred model, giving an uncertainty of about 30 K in $T_eff$, 0.02 dex in $\log g$, $0.7 \,R_\odot$ in radius and of about 2.5 Gyr in age.
  • We propose adding 300 mg/l PPO to the existing MiniBooNE detector mineral oil to increase the scintillation response. This will allow the detection of associated neutrons and increase sensitivity to final-state nucleons in neutrino interactions. This increased capability will enable an independent test of whether the current excess seen in the MiniBooNE oscillation search is signal or background. In addition it will enable other neutrino interaction measurements to be made including a search for the strange-quark contribution to the nucleon spin Delta s and a low-energy measurement of charged-current quasielastic scattering.
  • Femtocell networks are promising for not only improving the coverage but also increasing the capacity of current cellular networks. The interference-limited reality in femtocell networks makes interference management (IM) the key to maintaining the quality of service and fairness in femtocell networks. Over-the-air signaling is one of the most effective means for fast distributed dynamic IM. However, the design of this type of signal is challenging. In this paper, we address the challenges and propose an effective solution, referred to as single-tone signaling (STS). The proposed STS scheme possesses many highly desirable properties, such as no dedicated resource requirement (no system overhead), no near-far effect, no inter-signal interference, and immunity to synchronization error. In addition, the proposed STS signal provides a means for high quality wideband channel estimation for the use of coordinated techniques, such as coordinated beamforming. Based on the proposed STS, two distributed dynamic IM schemes, ON/OFF power control and SLNR (signal-to-leakage-plus-noise-ratio)-based transmitter beam coordination, are proposed. Simulation results show significant performance improvement as a result of the use of STS-based IM schemes.
  • Resource coordination and interference management is the key to achieving the benefits of femtocell networks. Over-the-air signaling is one of the most effective means for distributed dynamic resource coordination and interference management. However, the design of this type of signal is challenging. In this paper, we address the challenges and propose an effective solution, referred to as coded single-tone signaling (STS). The proposed coded STS scheme possesses certain highly desirable properties, such as no dedicated resource requirement (no overhead), no near-and-far effect, no inter-signal interference (no multi-user interference), low peak-to-average power ratio (deep coverage). In addition, the proposed coded STS can fully exploit frequency diversity and provides a means for high quality wideband channel estimation. The coded STS design is demonstrated through a concrete numerical example. Performance of the proposed coded STS and its effect on cochannel traffic channels are evaluated through simulations.
  • In this work, we propose a fast and energy-efficient neighbor discovery scheme for proximity-aware networks such as wireless ad hoc networks. Discovery efficiency is accomplished by the use of a special discovery signal that provides random multiple access with low transmit power consumption and low synchronization requirement.
  • Next generation wireless communications rely on multiple input multiple output (MIMO) techniques to achieve high data rates. Feedback of channel information can be used in MIMO precoding to fully activate the strongest channel modes and improve MIMO performance. Unfortunately, the bandwidth of the control channel via which the feedback is conveyed is severely limited. An important issue is how to improve the MIMO precoding performance with minimal feedback. In this letter, we present a method that uses a rotating codebook technique to effectively improve the precoding performance without the need of increasing feedback overhead. The basic idea of the rotating codebook precoding is to expend the effective precoding codebook size via rotating multiple codebooks so that the number of feedback bits remains unchanged. Simulation results are presented to show the performance gain of the proposed rotating codebook precoding over the conventional precoding.
  • We have measured solar-like oscillations in red giants using time-series photometry from the first 34 days of science operations of the Kepler Mission. The light curves, obtained with 30-minute sampling, reveal clear oscillations in a large sample of G and K giants, extending in luminosity from the red clump down to the bottom of the giant branch. We confirm a strong correlation between the large separation of the oscillations (Delta nu) and the frequency of maximum power (nu_max). We focus on a sample of 50 low-luminosity stars (nu_max > 100 muHz, L <~ 30 L_sun) having high signal-to-noise ratios and showing the unambiguous signature of solar-like oscillations. These are H-shell-burning stars, whose oscillations should be valuable for testing models of stellar evolution and for constraining the star-formation rate in the local disk. We use a new technique to compare stars on a single echelle diagram by scaling their frequencies and find well-defined ridges corresponding to radial and non-radial oscillations, including clear evidence for modes with angular degree l=3. Measuring the small separation between l=0 and l=2 allows us to plot the so-called C-D diagram of delta nu_02 versus Delta nu. The small separation delta nu_01 of l=1 from the midpoint of adjacent l=0 modes is negative, contrary to the Sun and solar-type stars. The ridge for l=1 is notably broadened, which we attribute to mixed modes, confirming theoretical predictions for low-luminosity giants. Overall, the results demonstrate the tremendous potential of Kepler data for asteroseismology of red giants.