• A detailed numerical study of the long time behaviour of dispersive shock waves in solutions to the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) I equation is presented. It is shown that modulated lump solutions emerge from the dispersive shock waves. For the description of dispersive shock waves, Whitham modulation equations for KP are obtained. It is shown that the modulation equations near the soliton line are hyperbolic for the KPII equation while they are elliptic for the KPI equation leading to a focusing effect and the formation of lumps. Such a behaviour is similar to the appearance of breathers for the focusing nonlinear Schrodinger equation in the semiclassical limit.
  • Temperature- and field- dependent $^1$H-, $^{19}$F-, and $^{79,81}$Br- NMR measurements together with zero - field $^{79,81}$Br-NQR measurements on polycrystalline samples of barlowite, Cu$_4$(OH)$_6$FBr are conducted to study the magnetism and possible structural distortions on a microscopic level. The temperature dependence of the $^{79,81}$Br- NMR spin-lattice relaxation rates 1/$T_1$ indicate a phase transition at $T_{\rm N}\simeq$15 K which is of magnetic origin, but with an unusually weak slowing down of fluctuations below $T_{\rm N}$. Moreover, 1/$T_1T$ scales linear with the bulk susceptibility which indicates persisting spin fluctuations down to 2 K. Quadupolare resonance (NQR) studies reveal a pair of zero-field NQR- lines associated with the two isotopes of Br with the nuclear spins of $I$ = 3/2. Quadrupole coupling constants of $\nu_Q\simeq$ 28.5~MHz and 24.7~MHz for $^{79}$Br- and $^{81}$Br- nuclei are determined from Br-NMR and the asymmetry parameter of the electric field gradient was estimated to $\eta \simeq 0.2$. The Br-NQR lines are consistent with our findings from Br-NMR and they are relatively broad, even above $T_{\rm N}$. This broadening and the relative large $\eta $ value suggests a symmetry reduction at the Br- site reflecting the presence of a local distortion in the lattice. Our density-functional calculations show that the displacements of Cu2 atoms located between the kagome planes do not account for this relatively large $\eta$. On the other hand, full structural relaxation, including the deformation of kagome planes, leads to a better agreement with the experiment.
  • We present a detailed numerical study of various blow-up issues in the context of the focusing Davey-Stewartson II equation. To this end we study Gaussian initial data and perturbations of the lump and the explicit blow-up solution due to Ozawa. Based on the numerical results it is conjectured that the blow-up in all cases is self similar, and that the time dependent scaling is as in the Ozawa solution and not as in the stable blow-up of standard $L^{2}$ critical nonlinear Schr\"odinger equations. The blow-up profile is given by a dynamically rescaled lump.
  • The defocusing Davey-Stewartson II equation has been shown in numerical experiments to exhibit behavior in the semiclassical limit that qualitatively resembles that of its one-dimensional reduction, the defocusing nonlinear Schr\"odinger equation, namely the generation from smooth initial data of regular rapid oscillations occupying domains of space-time that become well-defined in the limit. As a first step to study this problem analytically using the inverse-scattering transform, we consider the direct spectral transform for the defocusing Davey-Stewartson II equation for smooth initial data in the semiclassical limit. The direct spectral transform involves a singularly-perturbed elliptic Dirac system in two dimensions. We introduce a WKB-type method for this problem, prove that it makes sense formally for sufficiently large values of the spectral parameter $k$ by controlling the solution of an associated nonlinear eikonal problem, and we give numerical evidence that the method is accurate for such $k$ in the semiclassical limit. Producing this evidence requires both the numerical solution of the singularly-perturbed Dirac system and the numerical solution of the eikonal problem. The former is carried out using a method previously developed by two of the authors and we give in this paper a new method for the numerical solution of the eikonal problem valid for sufficiently large $k$. For a particular potential we are able to solve the eikonal problem in closed form for all $k$, a calculation that yields some insight into the failure of the WKB method for smaller values of $k$. Informed by numerical calculations of the direct spectral transform we then begin a study of the singularly-perturbed Dirac system for values of $k$ so small that there is no global solution of the eikonal problem.
  • The aim of this paper is to study, via theoretical analysis and numerical simulations, the dynamics of Whitham and related equations. In particular we establish rigorous bounds between solutions of the Whitham and KdV equations and provide some insights into the dynamics of the Whitham equation in different regimes, some of them being outside the range of validity of the Whitham equation as a water waves model.
  • An important step in the efficient computation of multi-dimensional theta functions is the construction of appropriate symplectic transformations for a given Riemann matrix assuring a rapid convergence of the theta series. An algorithm is presented to approximately map the Riemann matrix to the Siegel fundamental domain. The shortest vector of the lattice generated by the Riemann matrix is identified exactly, and the algorithm ensures that its length is larger than $\sqrt{3}/2$. The approach is based on a previous algorithm by Deconinck et al. using the LLL algorithm for lattice reductions. Here, the LLL algorithm is replaced by exact Minkowski reductions for small genus and an exact identification of the shortest lattice vector for larger values of the genus.
  • We study numerically the evolution of perturbed Korteweg-de Vries solitons and of well localized initial data by the Novikov-Veselov (NV) equation at different levels of the "energy" parameter $ E $. We show that as $ |E| \to \infty $, NV behaves, as expected, similarly to its formal limit, the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation. However at intermediate regimes, i.e. when $ | E | $ is not very large, more varied scenarios are possible, in particular, blow-ups are observed. The mechanism of the blow-up is studied.
  • The dispersionless Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (dKP) equation $(u_t+uu_x)_x=u_{yy}$ is one of the simplest nonlinear wave equations describing two-dimensional shocks. To solve the dKP equation we use a coordinate transformation inspired by the method of characteristics for the one-dimensional Hopf equation $u_t+uu_x=0$. We show numerically that the solutions to the transformed equation do not develop shocks. This permits us to extend the dKP solution as the graph of a multivalued function beyond the critical time when the gradients blow up. This overturned solution is multivalued in a lip shape region in the $(x,y)$ plane, where the solution of the dKP equation exists in a weak sense only, and a shock front develops. A local expansion reveals the universal scaling structure of the shock, which after a suitable change of coordinates corresponds to a generic cusp catastrophe. We provide a heuristic derivation of the shock front position near the critical point for the solution of the dKP equation, and study the solution of the dKP equation when a small amount of dissipation is added. Using multiple-scale analysis, we show that in the limit of small dissipation and near the critical point of the dKP solution, the solution of the dissipative dKP equation converges to a Pearcey integral. We test and illustrate our results by detailed comparisons with numerical simulations of both the regularized equation, the dKP equation, and the asymptotic description given in terms of the Pearcey integral.
  • The Kerr solution in coordinates corotating with the horizon is studied as a testbed for a spacetime with a helical Killing vector in the Ernst picture. The solution is numerically constructed by solving the Ernst equation with a spectral method and a Newton iteration. We discuss convergence of the iteration for several initial iterates and different values of the Kerr parameters.
  • A purely numerical approach to compact Riemann surfaces starting from plane algebraic curves is presented. The critical points of the algebraic curve are computed via a two-dimensional Newton iteration. The starting values for this iteration are obtained from the resultants with respect to both coordinates of the algebraic curve and a suitable pairing of their zeros. A set of generators of the fundamental group for the complement of these critical points in the complex plane is constructed from circles around these points and connecting lines obtained from a minimal spanning tree. The monodromies are computed by solving the defining equation of the algebraic curve on collocation points along these contours and by analytically continuing the roots. The collocation points are chosen to correspond to Chebychev collocation points for an ensuing Clenshaw-Curtis integration of the holomorphic differentials which gives the periods of the Riemann surface with spectral accuracy. At the singularities of the algebraic curve, Puiseux expansions computed by contour integration on the circles around the singularities are used to identify the holomorphic differentials. The Abel map is also computed with the Clenshaw-Curtis algorithm and contour integrals. As an application of the code, solutions to the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation are computed on non-hyperelliptic Riemann surfaces.
  • We present the first numerical approach to D-bar problems having spectral convergence for real analytic rapidly decreasing potentials. The proposed method starts from a formulation of the problem in terms of an integral equation which is solved with Fourier techniques. The singular integrand is regularized analytically. The resulting integral equation is approximated via a discrete system which is solved with Krylov methods. As an example, the D-bar problem for the Davey-Stewartson II equations is solved. The result is used to test direct numerical solutions of the PDE.
  • The Peregrine breather is widely discussed as a model for rogue waves in deep water. We present here a detailed numerical study of perturbations of the Peregrine breather as a solution to the nonlinear Schr\"odinger (NLS) equations. We first address the modulational instability of the constant modulus solution to NLS. Then we study numerically localized and nonlocalized perturbations of the Peregrine breather in the linear and fully nonlinear setting. It is shown that the solution is unstable against all considered perturbations.
  • For equation P$_I^2$, the second member in the P$_I$ hierarchy, we prove existence of various degenerate solutions depending on the complex parameter $t$ and evaluate the asymptotics in the complex $x$ plane for $|x|\to\infty$ and $t=o(x^{2/3})$. Using this result, we identify the most degenerate solutions $u^{(m)}(x,t)$, $\hat u^{(m)}(x,t)$, $m=0,...,6$, called {\em tritronqu\'ee}, describe the quasi-linear Stokes phenomenon and find the large $n$ asymptotics of the coefficients in a formal expansion of these solutions. We supplement our findings by a numerical study of the tritronqu\'ee solutions.
  • We present a detailed numerical study of solutions to general Korteweg-de Vries equations with critical and supercritical nonlinearity. We study the stability of solitons and show that they are unstable against being radiated away and blow-up. In the $L_{2}$ critical case, the blow-up mechanism by Martel, Merle and Rapha\"el can be numerically identified. In the limit of small dispersion, it is shown that a dispersive shock always appears before an eventual blow-up. In the latter case, always the first soliton to appear will blow up. It is shown that the same type of blow-up as for the perturbations of the soliton can be observed which indicates that the theory by Martel, Merle and Rapha\"el is also applicable to initial data with a mass much larger than the soliton mass. We study the scaling of the blow-up time $t^{*}$ in dependence of the small dispersion parameter $\epsilon$ and find an exponential dependence $t^{*}(\epsilon)$ and that there is a minimal blow-up time $t^{*}_{0}$ greater than the critical time of the corresponding Hopf solution for $\epsilon\to0$. To study the cases with blow-up in detail, we apply the first dynamic rescaling for generalized Korteweg-de Vries equations. This allows to identify the type of the singularity.
  • A multidomain spectral method with compactified exterior domains combined with stable second and fourth order time integrators is presented for Schr\"odinger equations. The numerical approach allows high precision numerical studies of solutions on the whole real line. At examples for the linear and cubic nonlinear Schr\"odinger equation, this code is compared to transparent boundary conditions and perfectly matched layers approaches. The code can deal with asymptotically non vanishing solutions as the Peregrine breather being discussed as a model for rogue waves. It is shown that the Peregrine breather can be numerically propagated with essentially machine precision, and that localized perturbations of this solution can be studied.
  • We survey and compare, mainly in the two-dimensional case, various results obtained by IST and PDE techniques for integrable equations. We also comment on what can be predicted from integrable equations on non integrable ones.
  • We present a computational approach to general hyperelliptic Riemann surfaces in Weierstrass normal form. The surface is either given by a list of the branch points, the coefficients of the defining polynomial or a system of cuts for the curve. A canonical basis of the homology is introduced algorithmically for this curve. The periods of the holomorphic differentials and the Abel map are computed with the Clenshaw-Curtis method in order to achieve spectral accuracy. The code can handle almost degenerate Riemann surfaces. This work generalizes previous work on real hyperelliptic surfaces with prescribed cuts to arbitrary hyperelliptic surfaces. As an example, solutions to the sine-Gordon equation in terms of multi-dimensional theta functions are studied, also in the solitonic limit of these solutions.
  • We provide a numerical study of various issues pertaining to the dynamics of the Davey-Stewartson systems of the DS II type. In particular we investigate whether or not the properties (blow-up, radiation,...) displayed by the focusing and defocusing DS II integrable systems persist in the non integrable case.
  • We present the first detailed numerical study of the semiclassical limit of the Davey-Stewartson II equations both for the focusing and the defocusing variant. We concentrate on rapidly decreasing initial data with a single hump. The formal limit of these equations for vanishing semiclassical parameter $\epsilon$, the semiclassical equations, are numerically integrated up to the formation of a shock. The use of parallelized algorithms allows to determine the critical time $t_{c}$ and the critical solution for these $2+1$-dimensional shocks. It is shown that the solutions generically break in isolated points similarly to the case of the $1+1$-dimensional cubic nonlinear Schr\"odinger equation, i.e., cubic singularities in the defocusing case and square root singularities in the focusing case. For small values of $\epsilon$, the full Davey-Stewartson II equations are integrated for the same initial data up to the critical time $t_{c}$. The scaling in $\epsilon$ of the difference between these solutions is found to be the same as in the $1+1$ dimensional case, proportional to $\epsilon^{2/7}$ for the defocusing case and proportional to $\epsilon^{2/5}$ in the focusing case. We document the Davey-Stewartson II solutions for small $\epsilon$ for times much larger than the critical time $t_{c}$. It is shown that zones of rapid modulated oscillations are formed near the shocks of the solutions to the semiclassical equations. For smaller $\epsilon$, the oscillatory zones become smaller and more sharply delimited to lens shaped regions. Rapid oscillations are also found in the focusing case for initial data where the singularities of the solution to the semiclassical equations do not coincide.
  • Using a Fourier spectral method, we provide a detailed numerically investigation of dispersive Schr\"odinger type equations involving a fractional Laplacian. By an appropriate choice of the dispersive exponent, both mass and energy sub- and supercritical regimes can be computed in one spatial dimension, only. This allows us to study the possibility of finite time blow-up versus global existence, the nature of the blow-up, the stability and instability of nonlinear ground states, and the long time dynamics of solutions. The latter is also studied in a semiclassical setting. Moreover, we numerically construct ground state solutions to the fractional nonlinear Schr\"odinger equation.
  • We present the first detailed numerical study of the Toda equations in $2+1$ dimensions in the limit of long wavelengths, both for the hyperbolic and elliptic case. We first study the formal dispersionless limit of the Toda equations and solve initial value problems for the resulting system up to the point of gradient catastrophe. It is shown that the break-up of the solution in the hyperbolic case is similar to the shock formation in the Hopf equation, a $1+1$ dimensional singularity. In the elliptic case, it is found that the break-up is given by a cusp as for the semiclassical system of the focusing nonlinear Schr\"odinger equation in $1+1$ dimensions. The full Toda system is then studied for finite small values of the dispersion parameter $\epsilon$ in the vicinity of the shocks of the dispersionless Toda equations. We determine the scaling in $\epsilon$ of the difference between the Toda solution for small $\epsilon$ and the singular solution of the dispersionless Toda system. In the hyperbolic case, the same scaling proportional to $\epsilon^{2/7}$ is found as in the small dispersion limit of the Korteweg-de Vries and the defocusing nonlinear Schr\"odinger equations. In the elliptic case, we obtain the same scaling proportional to $\epsilon^{2/5}$ as in the semiclassical limit for the focusing nonlinear Schr\"odinger equation. We also study the formation of dispersive shocks for times much larger than the break-up time in the hyperbolic case. In the elliptic case, an $L_{\infty}$ blow-up is observed instead of a dispersive shock for finite times greater than the break-up time. The $\epsilon$-dependence of the blow-up time is determined.
  • We provide a detailed numerical study of various issues pertaining to the dynamics of the Burgers equation perturbed by a weak dispersive term: blow-up in finite time versus global existence, nature of the blow-up, existence for "long" times, and the decomposition of the initial data into solitary waves plus radiation. We numerically construct solitons for fractionary Korteweg-de Vries equations.
  • We study the critical behaviour of solutions to weakly dispersive Hamiltonian systems considered as perturbations of elliptic and hyperbolic systems of hydrodynamic type with two components. We argue that near the critical point of gradient catastrophe of the dispersionless system, the solutions to a suitable initial value problem for the perturbed equations are approximately described by particular solutions to the Painlev\'e-I (P$_I$) equation or its fourth order analogue P$_I^2$. As concrete examples we discuss nonlinear Schr\"odinger equations in the semiclassical limit. A numerical study of these cases provides strong evidence in support of the conjecture.
  • We present a numerical study of solutions to the generalized Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equations with critical and supercritical nonlinearity for localized initial data with a single minimum and single maximum. In the cases with blow-up, we use a dynamic rescaling to identify the type of the singularity. We present a discussion of the observed blow-up scenarios.
  • There exist two versions of the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation, related to the Cartesian and cylindrical geometries of the waves. In this paper we derive and study a new version, related to the elliptic cylindrical geometry. The derivation is given in the context of surface waves, but the derived equation is a universal integrable model applicable to generic weakly-nonlinear weakly-dispersive waves. We also show that there exist nontrivial transformations between all three versions of the KP equation associated with the physical problem formulation, and use them to obtain new classes of approximate solutions for water waves.