• We use a background quasar to detect the presence of circum-galactic gas around a $z=0.91$ low-mass star forming galaxy. Data from the new Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) on the VLT show that the host galaxy has a dust-corrected star-formation rate (SFR) of 4.7$\pm$0.2 Msun/yr, with no companion down to 0.22 Msun/yr (5 $\sigma$) within 240 kpc (30"). Using a high-resolution spectrum (UVES) of the background quasar, which is fortuitously aligned with the galaxy major axis (with an azimuth angle $\alpha$ of only $15^\circ$), we find, in the gas kinematics traced by low-ionization lines, distinct signatures consistent with those expected for a "cold flow disk" extending at least 12 kpc ($3\times R_{1/2}$). We estimate the mass accretion rate $\dot M_{\rm in}$ to be at least two to three times larger than the SFR, using the geometric constraints from the IFU data and the HI column density of $\log N_{\rm HI} \simeq 20.4$ obtained from a {\it HST}/COS NUV spectrum. From a detailed analysis of the low-ionization lines (e.g. ZnII, CrII, TiII, MnII, SiII), the accreting material appears to be enriched to about 0.4 $Z_\odot$ (albeit with large uncertainties: $\log Z/Z_\odot=-0.4~\pm~0.4$), which is comparable to the galaxy metallicity ($12+\log \rm O/H=8.7\pm0.2$), implying a large recycling fraction from past outflows. Blue-shifted MgII and FeII absorptions in the galaxy spectrum from the MUSE data reveal the presence of an outflow. The MgII and FeII doublet ratios indicate emission infilling due to scattering processes, but the MUSE data do not show any signs of fluorescent FeII* emission.
  • We present a study of the prevalence, strength, and kinematics of ultraviolet FeII and MgII emission lines in 212 star-forming galaxies at z = 1 selected from the DEEP2 survey. We find FeII* emission in composite spectra assembled on the basis of different galaxy properties, indicating that FeII* emission is prevalent at z = 1. In these composites, FeII* emission is observed at roughly the systemic velocity. At z = 1, we find that the strength of FeII* emission is most strongly modulated by dust attenuation, and is additionally correlated with redshift, star-formation rate, and [OII] equivalent width, such that systems at higher redshifts with lower dust levels, lower star-formation rates, and larger [OII] equivalent widths show stronger FeII* emission. We detect MgII emission in at least 15% of the individual spectra and we find that objects showing stronger MgII emission have higher specific star-formation rates, smaller [OII] linewidths, larger [OII] equivalent widths, lower dust attenuations, and lower stellar masses than the sample as a whole. MgII emission strength exhibits the strongest correlation with specific star-formation rate, although we find evidence that dust attenuation and stellar mass also play roles in the regulation of MgII emission. Future integral field unit observations of the spatial extent of FeII* and MgII emission in galaxies with high specific star-formation rates, low dust attenuations, and low stellar masses will be important for probing the morphology of circumgalactic gas.
  • Spectroscopic observations of Halpha and Hbeta emission lines of 128 star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 0.75<z<1.5 are presented. These data were taken with slitless spectroscopy using the G102 and G141 grisms of the Wide-Field-Camera 3 (WFC3) on board the Hubble Space Telescope as part of the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallel (WISP) survey. Interstellar dust extinction is measured from stacked spectra that cover the Balmer decrement (Halpha/Hbeta). We present dust extinction as a function of Halpha luminosity (down to 3 x 10^{41} erg/s), galaxy stellar mass (reaching 4 x 10^{8} Msun), and rest-frame Halpha equivalent width. The faintest galaxies are two times fainter in Halpha luminosity than galaxies previously studied at z~1.5. An evolution is observed where galaxies of the same Halpha luminosity have lower extinction at higher redshifts, whereas no evolution is found within our error bars with stellar mass. The lower Halpha luminosity galaxies in our sample are found to be consistent with no dust extinction. We find an anti-correlation of the [OIII]5007/Halpha flux ratio as a function of luminosity where galaxies with L_{Halpha}<5 x 10^{41} erg/s are brighter in [OIII]5007 than Halpha. This trend is evident even after extinction correction, suggesting that the increased [OIII]5007/Halpha ratio in low luminosity galaxies is likely due to lower metallicity and/or higher ionization parameters.
  • We investigate galactic-scale outflowing winds in 72 star-forming galaxies at z~1 in the Extended Groth Strip. Galaxies were selected from the DEEP2 survey and follow-up LRIS spectroscopy was obtained covering SiII, CIV, FeII, MgII, and MgI lines in the rest-frame ultraviolet. Using GALEX, HST, and Spitzer imaging, we examine galaxies on a per-object basis in order to understand both the prevalence of galactic winds at z~1 and the star-forming and structural properties of objects experiencing outflows. Gas velocities, measured from the centroids of FeII interstellar absorption lines, span the interval [-217, +155] km/s. We find that ~40% (10%) of the sample exhibits blueshifted FeII lines at the 1-sigma (3-sigma) level. We also measure maximal outflow velocities using the profiles of the FeII and MgII lines, and show that MgII frequently traces higher velocity gas than FeII. Quantitative morphological parameters derived from the HST imaging suggest that mergers are not a prerequisite for driving outflows. More face-on galaxies also show stronger winds than highly-inclined systems, consistent with the canonical picture of winds emanating perpendicular to galactic disks. Using star-formation rates calculated from GALEX data, and areas estimated from HST imaging, we detect a ~3-sigma correlation between outflow velocity and star-formation rate surface density, but only a weak (~1-sigma) trend between outflow velocity and star-formation rate. Higher resolution data are needed in order to test the scaling relations between outflow velocity and both star-formation rate and star-formation rate surface density predicted by theory.
  • Using a spectral decomposition technique (Soto & Martin 2012, hereafter Paper I), we investigate the physical origin of the high-velocity emission line gas in a sample of 39 gas-rich, ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) mergers. Regions with shock-like excitation were identified in two kinematically distinct regimes, characterized by broad ($\sigma >$ 150 \kms) and narrow linewidths. Here we investigate the physical origin of the high-velocity (broad) emission with shock-like line ratios. Considering the large amount of extinction in these galaxies, the blueshift of the broad emission suggests an origin on the near side of the galaxy and therefore an interpretation as a galactic outflow. The large spatial extent of the broad, shocked emission component is generally inconsistent with an origin in the narrow-line region of a AGN, so we conclude that energy and momentum supplied by the starburst drives these outflows. The new data are used to examine the fraction of the supernova energy radiated by shocks and the mass loss rate in the warm-ionized phase of the wind. We show that the shocks produced by galactic outflows can be recognized in moderately high-resolution, integrated spectra of these nearby, ultraluminous starbursts. The spectral fitting technique introduced in Paper I may therefore be used to improve the accuracy of the physical properties measured for high-redshift galaxies from their (observed frame) infrared spectra.
  • [Abridged] In order to understand which process (e.g. galactic winds, cold accretion) is responsible for the cool (T~10^4 K) halo gas around galaxies, we embarked on a program to study the star-formation properties of galaxies selected by their MgII absorption signature in quasar spectra. Specifically, we searched for the H-alpha line emission from galaxies near very strong z=2 MgII absorbers (with rest-frame equivalent width EW>2 \AA) because these could be the sign-posts of outflows or inflows. Surprisingly, we detect H-alpha from only 4 hosts out of 20 sight-lines (and 2 out of the 19 HI-selected sight-lines), despite reaching a star-formation rate (SFR) sensitivity limit of 2.9 M/yr (5-sigma) for a Chabrier initial mass function. This low success rate is in contrast with our z=1 survey where we detected 66%\ (14/21) of the MgII hosts. Taking into account the difference in sensitivity between the two surveys, we should have been able to detect >11.4 of the 20 z=2 hosts whereas we found only 4 galaxies. Interestingly, all the z=2 detected hosts have observed SFR greater than 9 M/yr, well above our sensitivity limit, while at z=1 they all have SFR less than 9 M/yr, an evolution that is in good agreement with the evolution of the SFR main sequence. Moreover, we show that the z=2 undetected hosts are not hidden under the quasar continuum after stacking our data and that they also cannot be outside our surveyed area. Hence, strong MgII absorbers could trace star-formation driven winds in low-mass halos (Mhalo < 10^{10.6} Msun). Alternatively, our results imply that z=2 galaxies traced by strong MgII absorbers do not form stars at a rate expected (3--10 M/yr) for their (halo or stellar) masses, supporting the existence of a transition in accretion efficiency at Mhalo ~ 10^{11} Msun. This scenario can explain both the detections and the non-detections.
  • We report the detection of variable emission from Sgr A* in almost all wavelength bands (i.e. centimeter, millimeter, submillimeter, near-IR and X-rays) during a multi-wavelength observing campaign. Three new moderate flares are detected simultaneously in both near-IR and X-ray bands. The ratio of X-ray to near-IR flux in the flares is consistent with inverse Compton scattering of near-IR photons by submillimeter emitting relativistic particles which follow scaling relations obtained from size measurements of Sgr A*. We also find that the flare statistics in near-IR wavelengths is consistent with the probability of flare emission being inversely proportional to the flux. At millimeter wavelengths, the presence of flare emission at 43 GHz (7mm) using VLBA with milli-arcsecond spatial resolution indicates the first direct evidence that hourly time scale flares are localized within the inner 30$\times$70 Schwarzschild radii of Sgr A*. We also show several cross correlation plots between near-IR, millimeter and submillimeter light curves that collectively demonstrate the presence of time delays between the peaks of emission up to three hours. The evidence for time delays at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths are consistent with the source of emission being optically thick initially followed by a transition to an optically thin regime. In particular, there is an intriguing correlation between the optically thin near-IR and X-ray flare and optically thick radio flare at 43 GHz that occurred on 2007 April 4. This would be the first evidence of a radio flare emission at 43 GHz delayed with respect to the near-IR and X-ray flare emission.
  • We measure Doppler shifts of interstellar absorption lines in HST/STIS spectra of individual star clusters in nearby UV-selected galaxies. Values for systemic velocities, which are needed to quantify outflow speeds, are taken from the literature, and verified with stellar lines. We detect outflowing gas in eight of 17 galaxies via low-ionization lines (e.g., CII, SiII, AlII), which trace cold and/or warm gas. The starbursts in our sample are intermediate in luminosity (and mass) to dwarf galaxies and luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs), and we confirm that their outflow speeds (ranging from -100 km/s to nearly -520 km/s with an accuracy of ~80 km/s) are intermediate to those previously measured in dwarf starbursts and LIRGs. We do not detect the outflow in high-ionization lines (such as CIV or SiIV); higher quality data will be needed to empirically establish how velocities vary with the ionization state of the outflow. We do verify that the low-ionization UV lines and optical NaI doublet give roughly consistent outflow velocities solidifying an important link between studies of galactic winds at low and high redshift. To obtain higher signal-to-noise, we create a local average composite spectrum, and compare it to the high-z Lyman Break composite spectrum. Surprisingly, the low-ionization lines show similar outflow velocities in the two samples. We attribute this to a combination of weighting towards higher luminosities in the local composite, as well as both samples being on average brighter than the ``turnover'' luminosity in the v-SFR relation.
  • We present the imaging observations made with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph of the Hubble Deep Field - South. The field was imaged in 4 bandpasses: a clear CCD bandpass for 156 ksec, a long-pass filter for 22-25 ksec per pixel typical exposure, a near-UV bandpass for 23 ksec, and a far-UV bandpass for 52 ksec. The clear visible image is the deepest observation ever made in the UV-optical wavelength region, reaching a 10 sigma AB magnitude of 29.4 for an object of area 0.2 square arcseconds. The field contains QSO J2233-606, the target of the STIS spectroscopy, and extends 50"x50" for the visible images, and 25"x25" for the ultraviolet images. We present the images, catalog of objects, and galaxy counts obtained in the field.
  • We consider a generalization of the standard Metropolis algorithm acceptance/rejection decision rule and numerically explore its properties using auxiliary field quantum Monte Carlo. The generalization involves a free parameter which, given a criterion for proposing attempted moves, can be used to tune the average acceptance rate in a particular way. Such tuning can also potentially change Monte Carlo autocorrelation times, and the combination of the changing acceptance rate and autocorrelation times raises the possibility of more efficient simulations. We explore these issues using primarily massively parallel quantum Monte Carlo runs of the ``test case'' two-dimensional Hubbard model, and discuss results and applications.