• We present Spitzer 4.5\micron\ light curve observations, Keck NIRSPEC radial velocity observations, and LCOGT optical light curve observations of PTFO~8-8695, which may host a Jupiter-sized planet in a very short orbital period (0.45 days). Previous work by \citet{vaneyken12} and \citet{barnes13} predicts that the stellar rotation axis and the planetary orbital plane should precess with a period of $300 - 600$ days. As a consequence, the observed transits should change shape and depth, disappear, and reappear with the precession. Our observations indicate the long-term presence of the transit events ($>3$ years), and that the transits indeed do change depth, disappear and reappear. The Spitzer observations and the NIRSPEC radial velocity observations (with contemporaneous LCOGT optical light curve data) are consistent with the predicted transit times and depths for the $M_\star = 0.34\ M_\odot$ precession model and demonstrate the disappearance of the transits. An LCOGT optical light curve shows that the transits do reappear approximately 1 year later. The observed transits occur at the times predicted by a straight-forward propagation of the transit ephemeris. The precession model correctly predicts the depth and time of the Spitzer transit and the lack of a transit at the time of the NIRSPEC radial velocity observations. However, the precession model predicts the return of the transits approximately 1 month later than observed by LCOGT. Overall, the data are suggestive that the planetary interpretation of the observed transit events may indeed be correct, but the precession model and data are currently insufficient to confirm firmly the planetary status of PTFO~8-8695b.
  • High-resolution spectropolarimetric observations provide simultaneous information about stellar magnetic field topologies and three-dimensional distributions of chemical elements. Here we present analysis of a unique full Stokes vector spectropolarimetric data set, acquired for the cool magnetic Ap star HD 24712. The goal of our work is to examine circular and linear polarization signatures inside spectral lines and to study variation of the stellar spectrum and magnetic observables as a function of rotational phase. HD 24712 was observed with the HARPSpol instrument at the 3.6-m ESO telescope over a period of 2010-2011. The resulting spectra have S/N ratio of 300-600 and resolving power exceeding 100000. The multiline technique of least-squares deconvolution (LSD) was applied to combine information from the spectral lines of Fe-peak and rare-earth elements. We used the HARPSPol spectra of HD 24712 to study the morphology of the Stokes profile shapes in individual spectral lines and in LSD Stokes profiles corresponding to different line masks. From the LSD Stokes V profiles we measured the longitudinal component of the magnetic field, <Bz>, with an accuracy of 5-10 G. We also determined the net linear polarization from the LSD Stokes Q and U profiles. We determined an improved rotational period of the star, P_rot = 12.45812 +/- 0.00019d. We measured <Bz> from the cores of Halpha and Hbeta lines. The analysis of <Bz> measurements showed no evidence for a significant radial magnetic field gradient in the atmosphere of HD 24712. We used our <Bz> and net linear polarization measurements to determine parameters of the dipolar magnetic field topology. We found that magnetic observables can be reasonably well reproduced by the dipolar model. We discovered rotational modulation of the Halpha core and related it a non-uniform surface distribution of rare-earth elements.
  • We present high spectral resolution ($R\approx108,000$) Stokes $V$ polarimetry of the Classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs) GQ Lup and TW Hya obtained with the polarimetric upgrade to the HARPS spectrometer on the ESO 3.6 m telescope. We present data on both photospheric lines and emission lines, concentrating our discussion on the polarization properties of the \ion{He}{1} emission lines at 5876 \AA\ and 6678 \AA. The \ion{He}{1} lines in these CTTSs contain both narrow emission cores, believed to come from near the accretion shock region on these stars, and broad emission components which may come from either a wind or the large scale magnetospheric accretion flow. We detect strong polarization in the narrow component of the two \ion{He}{1} emission lines in both stars. We observe a maximum implied field strength of $6.05 \pm 0.24$ kG in the 5876 \AA\ line of GQ Lup, making it the star with the highest field strength measured in this line for a CTTS. We find field strengths in the two \ion{He}{1} lines that are consistent with each other, in contrast to what has been reported in the literature on at least one star. We do not detect any polarization in the broad component of the \ion{He}{1} lines on these stars, strengthening the conclusion that they form over a substantially different volume relative the formation region of the narrow component of the \ion{He}{1} lines.
  • Mercury-manganese (HgMn) stars have been considered as non-magnetic and non-variable chemically peculiar (CP) stars for a long time. However, recent discoveries of the variability in spectral line profiles have suggested an inhomogeneous surface distribution of chemical elements in some HgMn stars. From the studies of other CP stars it is known that magnetic field plays a key role in the formation of surface spots. All attempts to find magnetic fields in HgMn stars have yielded negative results. In this study, we investigate the possible presence of a magnetic field in phi Phe (HD 11753) and reconstruct surface distribution of chemical elements that show variability in spectral lines.We also test a hypothesis that a magnetic field is concentrated in chemical spots and look into the possibility that some chemical elements are stratified with depth in the stellar atmosphere. Our analysis is based on high-quality spectropolarimetric time-series observations, covering a full rotational period of the star. Spectra were obtained with the HARPSpol at the ESO 3.6-m telescope. Combining information from all suitable spectral lines, we set an upper limit of 4 G on the mean longitudinal magnetic field. For chemical spots, an upper limit on the longitudinal field varies between 8 and 15 G. We confirmed the variability of Y, Sr, and Ti and detected variability in Cr lines. Stratification analysis showed that Y and Ti are not concentrated in the uppermost atmospheric layers. Our spectropolarimetric observations rule out the presence of a strong, globally-organised magnetic field in phi Phe. This implies an alternative mechanism of spot formation, which could be related to a non-equilibrium atomic diffusion. However, the typical time scales of the variation in stratification predicted by the recent time-dependent diffusion models exceed significantly the spot evolution time-scale reported for phi Phe.
  • According to our current understanding, a subclass of the upper main sequence chemically peculiar stars, called mercury-manganese (HgMn), is non-magnetic. Nevertheless, chemical inhomogeneities were recently discovered on their surfaces. At the same time, no global magnetic fields stronger than 1-100 G are detected by modern studies. The goals of our study are to search for magnetic field in the HgMn binary system 66 Eri and to investigate chemical spots on the stellar surfaces of both components. Our analysis is based on high quality spectropolarimetric time-series observations obtained during 10 consecutive nights with the HARPSpol instrument at the ESO 3.6-m telescope. To increase the sensitivity of the magnetic field search we employed a least-squares deconvolution (LSD). We used spectral disentangling to measure radial velocities and study line profile variability. Chemical spot geometry was reconstructed using multi-line Doppler imaging. We report a non-detection of magnetic field in 66 Eri, with error bars 10-24 G for the longitudinal field. Circular polarization profiles also do not indicate any signatures of complex surface magnetic fields. For a simple dipolar field configuration we estimated an upper limit of the polar field strength to be 60-70 G. For the HgMn component we found variability in spectral lines of Ti, Ba, Y, and Sr with the rotational period equal to the orbital one. The surface maps of these elements reconstructed with the Doppler imaging technique, show relative underabundance on the hemisphere facing the secondary component. The contrast of chemical inhomogeneities ranges from 0.4 for Ti to 0.8 for Ba.
  • We performed a highly sensitive search for magnetic fields on a large set of HgMn stars. With the aid of a new polarimeter attached to the HARPS spectrometer at the ESO 3.6m-telescope, we obtained high-quality circular polarization spectra of 41 single and double HgMn stars. Using a multi-line analysis technique on each star, we co-added information from hundreds of spectral lines resulting in significantly greater sensitivity to the presence of magnetic fields, including very weak fields. For the 47 individual objects studied, including 6 components of SB2 systems, we do not detect any magnetic fields at greater than the 3 sigma level. The lack of detection in the circular polarization profiles indicates that if strong fields are present on these stars, they must have complex surface topologies. For simple global fields, our detection limits imply upper limits to the fields present of 2-10 Gauss in the best cases. We conclude that HgMn stars lack large-scale magnetic fields, typical for spotted magnetic Ap stars, sufficient to form and sustain the chemical spots observed on HgMn stars. Our study confirms that in addition to magnetically altered atomic diffusion, there exists another differentiation mechanism operating in the atmospheres of late-B main sequence stars which can compositional inhomogeneities on their surfaces.
  • Na I D lines in the spectrum of the young binary KH 15D have been analyzed in detail. We find an excess absorption component that may be attributed to foreground interstellar absorption, and to gas possibly associated with the solids in the circumbinary disk. The derived column density is log N_NaI = 12.5 cm^-2, centered on a radial velocity that is consistent with the systemic velocity. Subtracting the likely contribution of the ISM leaves log N_NaI ~ 12.3 cm^-2. There is no detectable change in the gas column density across the "knife edge" formed by the opaque grain disk, indicating that the gas and solids have very different scale heights, with the solids being highly settled. Our data support a picture of this circumbinary disk as being composed of a very thin particulate grain layer composed of millimeter-sized or larger objects that are settled within whatever remaining gas may be present. This phase of disk evolution has been hypothesized to exist as a prelude to the formation of planetesimals through gravitational fragmentation, and is expected to be short-lived if much gas were still present in such a disk. Our analysis also reveals the presence of excess Na I emission relative to the comparison spectrum at the radial velocity of the currently visible star that plausibly arises within the magnetosphere of this still-accreting young star.
  • In searches for low-mass companions to late-type stars, correlation between radial velocity variations and line bisector slope changes indicates contamination by large starspots. Two young stars demonstrate that this test is not sufficient to rule out starspots as a cause of radial velocity variations. As part of our survey for substellar companions to T Tauri stars, we identified the ~2 Myr old planet host candidates DN Tau and V836 Tau. In both cases, visible light radial velocity modulation appears periodic and is uncorrelated with line bisector span variations, suggesting close companions of several M_Jup in these systems. However, high-resolution, infrared spectroscopy shows that starspots cause the radial velocity variations. We also report unambiguous results for V827 Tau, identified as a spotted star on the basis of both visible light and infrared spectroscopy. Our results suggest that infrared follow up observations are critical for determining the source of radial velocity modulation in young, spotted stars.
  • We present high resolution (R ~ 60,000) circular spectropolarimetry of the classical T Tauri star TW Hydrae. We analyze 12 photospheric absorption lines and measure the net longitudinal magnetic field for 6 consecutive nights. While no net polarization is detected the first five nights, a significant photospheric field of Bz = 149 \pm 33 G is found on the sixth night. To rule out spurious instrumental polarization, we apply the same analysis technique to several non-magnetic telluric lines, detecting no significant polarization. We further demonstrate the reality of this field detection by showing that the splitting between right and left polarized components in these 12 photospheric lines shows a linear trend with Lande g-factor times wavelength squared, as predicted by the Zeeman effect. However, this longitudinal field detection is still much lower than that which would result if a pure dipole magnetic geometry is responsible for the mean magnetic field strength of 2.6 kG previously reported for TW Hya. We also detect strong circular polarization in the He I 5876 and the Ca II 8498 emission lines, indicating a strong field in the line formation region of these features. The polarization of the Ca II line is substantially weaker than that of the He I line, which we interpret as due to a larger contribution to the Ca II line from chromospheric emission in which the polarization signals cancel. However, the presence of polarization in the Ca II line indicates that accretion shocks on Classical T Tauri stars do produce narrow emission features in the infrared triplet lines of Calcium.
  • A planet transits an 11th magnitude, G1V star in the constellation Corona Borealis. We designate the planet XO-1b, and the star, XO-1, also known as GSC 02041-01657. XO-1 lacks a trigonometric distance; we estimate it to be 200+-20 pc. Of the ten stars currently known to host extrasolar transiting planets, the star XO-1 is the most similar to the Sun in its physical characteristics: its radius is 1.0+-0.08 R_Sun, its mass is 1.0+-0.03 M_Sun, V sini < 3 km/s, and its metallicity [Fe/H] is 0.015+-0.04. The orbital period of the planet XO-1b is 3.941534+-0.000027 days, one of the longer ones known. The planetary mass is 0.90+-0.07 M_Jupiter, which is marginally larger than that of other transiting planets with periods between 3 and 4 days. Both the planetary radius and the inclination are functions of the spectroscopically determined stellar radius. If the stellar radius is 1.0+-0.08 R_Sun, then the planetary radius is 1.30+-0.11 R_Jupiter and the inclination of the orbit is 87.7+-1.2 degrees. We have demonstrated a productive international collaboration between professional and amateur astronomers that was important to distinguishing this planet from many other similar candidates.
  • We report on multi-wavelength observations spanning radio to X-ray wavelengths of the M dwarf flare star, EV Lacertae, probing the characteristics of the outer atmospheric plasma from the upper chromosphere to the corona. We detect the star at a wavelength of 2 cm (15 GHz) for the first time. UV and FUV line profiles show evidence of nonthermal broadening, and the velocity width appear to peak at lower temperatures than in the Sun; this trend is confirmed in another active M dwarf flare star. Electron density measurements indicate nearly constant electron pressures between $\log T=$5.2 and 6.4. At higher coronal temperatures, there is a sharp increase of two orders of magnitude in density (n$_{e}\sim10^{13}$ cm$^{-3}$ at $\log T=$6.9). X-ray, EUV, FUV and NUV spectra constrain the DEM from the upper chromosphere through the corona. The coronal pressures are inconsistent with the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium, either through EM modeling or application of scaling laws, and imply large conductive loss rates and a large energy input at the highest temperatures. The timescales for radiative and conductive losses in EV Lac's upper atmosphere imply that significant continued heating must occur for the corona to maintain its quiescent properties. The high frequency radio detection requires the high temperature X-ray-emitting coronal plasma to be spatially distinct from the radio emission source. Length scales in the low-temperature corona are markedly larger than those in the high-temperature corona, further suggestions of an inhomogeneous mixture of thermal and nonthermal coronal plasma.
  • We present infrared (IR) and optical echelle spectra of the Classical T Tauri star TW Hydrae. Using the optical data, we perform detailed spectrum synthesis to fit atomic and molecular absorption lines and determine key stellar parameters: Teff = 4126 \pm 24 K, log g = 4.84 \pm 0.16, [M/H] = -0.10 \pm 0.12, vsini = 5.8 \pm 0.6 km/s. The IR spectrum is used to look for Zeeman broadening of photospheric absorption lines. We fit four Zeeman sensitive Ti I lines near 2.2 microns and find the average value of the magnetic field over the entire surface is 2.61 \pm 0.23 kG. In addition, several nearby magnetically insensitive CO lines show no excess broadening above that produced by stellar rotation and instrumental broadening, reinforcing the magnetic interpretation for the width of the Ti I lines. We carry out extensive tests to quantify systematic errors in our analysis technique which may result from inaccurate knowledge of the effective temperature or gravity, finding that reasonable errors in these quantities produce a 10% uncertainty in the mean field measurement.
  • The objective of this paper is to investigate whether a convective dynamo can account quantitatively for the observed lower limit of X-ray surface flux in solar-type main sequence stars. Our approach is to use 3D numerical simulations of a turbulent dynamo driven by convection to characterize the dynamic behavior, magnetic field strengths, and filling factors in a non-rotating stratified medium, and to predict these magnetic properties at the surface of cool stars. We use simple applications of stellar structure theory for the convective envelopes of main-sequence stars to scale our simulations to the outer layers of stars in the F0--M0 spectral range, which allows us to estimate the unsigned magnetic flux on the surface of non-rotating reference stars. With these estimates we use the recent results of \citet{Pevtsov03} to predict the level of X-ray emission from such a turbulent dynamo, and find that our results compare well with observed lower limits of surface X-ray flux. If we scale our predicted X-ray fluxes to \ion{Mg}{2} fluxes we also find good agreement with the observed lower limit of chromospheric emission in K dwarfs. This suggests that dynamo action from a convecting, non-rotating plasma is a viable alternative to acoustic heating models as an explanation for the basal emission level seen in chromospheric, transition region, and coronal diagnostics from late-type stars.
  • We present the first simultaneous, multi-wavelength observations of an L dwarf, the L3.5 candidate brown dwarf 2MASS J00361617+1821104, conducted with the Very Large Array, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the Kitt Peak 4-m telescope. We detect strongly variable and periodic radio emission (P=3 hr) with a fraction of about 60% circular polarization. No X-ray emission is detected to a limit of L_X/L_{bol}<2e-5, several hundred times below the saturation level observed in early M dwarfs. Similarly, we do not detect H-alpha emission to a limit of L_{H-alpha}/L_{bol}<2e-7, the deepest for any L dwarf observed to date. The ratio of radio to X-ray luminosity is at least four orders of magnitude in excess of that observed in a wide range of active stars (including M dwarfs) providing the first direct confirmation that late-M and L dwarfs violate the radio/X-ray correlation. The radio emission is due to gyrosynchrotron radiation in a large-scale magnetic field of about 175 G, which is maintained on timescales longer than three years. The detected 3-hour period may be due to (i) the orbital motion of a companion at a separation of about five stellar radii, similar to the configuration of RS CVn systems, (ii) an equatorial rotation velocity of about 37 km/s and an anchored, long-lived magnetic field, or (iii) periodic release of magnetic stresses in the form of weak flares. In the case of orbital motion, the magnetic activity may be induced by the companion, possibly explaining the unusual pattern of activity and the long-lived signal. We conclude that fully convective stars can maintain a large-scale and stable magnetic field, but the lack of X-ray and H-alpha emission indicates that the atmospheric conditions are markedly different than in early-type stars and even M dwarfs. [abridged]
  • We present the results of a campaign to observe flares on the M dwarf flare star EV Lacertae over the course of two days in 2001 September, utilizing a combination of radio continuum, optical photometric and spectroscopic, ultraviolet spectroscopic, and X-ray spectroscopic observations, to characterize the multi-wavelength nature of flares from this active, single late-type star. We find flares in every wavelength region in which we observed. In the multi-wavelength context, the start of the intense radio flare is coincident with an impulsive optical U-band flare, to within one minute, and yet there is no signature of an X-ray response. There are other intervals of time where optical flaring and UV flaring is occurring, but these cannot be related to the contemporaneous X-ray flaring: the time-integrated luminosities do not match the instantaneous X-ray flare luminosity, as one would expect for the Neupert effect. We investigate the probability of chance occurrences of flares from disparate wavelength regions producing temporal coincidences, but find that not all the flare associations can be explained by a superposition of flares due to a high flaring rate. We caution against making causal associations of multi-wavelength flares based solely on temporal correlations for high flaring rate stars like EV Lac.
  • We present results from the 1996 MUSICOS (MUlti-SIte COntinuous Spectroscopy) campaign on the T Tauri star SU Aurigae. We find a 2.7-d periodicity in the He I (587.6 nm) line and somewhat longer, less well-pronounced periodicities in the Balmer lines and in Na D. Our observations support the suggestion that the wind and infall signatures are out of phase on SU Aur. We present Doppler images of SU Aur that have been obtained from least-squares deconvolved profiles. Images taken about one rotation apart show only limited overlap, in particular at low latitudes. This is in part due to limitations in signal-to-noise, and in part due to line profile deformations that arise from short-lived and/or non-surface features. The agreement at high latitudes is better and suggests that at least some longer-lived features are present. The analysis of Stokes V profiles yields a marginal magnetic field detection during one of the phases.
  • We have analyzed GHRS data of eight CTTS and one WTTS. The GHRS data consists of spectral ranges 40 A wide centered on 1345, 1400, 1497, 1550, and 1900 A. These UV spectra show strong SiIV, and CIV emission, and large quantities of sharp (~40 km/s) H2 lines. All the H2 lines belong to the Lyman band and all the observed lines are single peaked and optically thin. The averages of all the H2 lines centroids for each star are negative which may indicate that they come from an outflow. We interpret the emission in H2 as being due to fluorescence, mostly by Ly_alpha, and identify seven excitation routes within 4 A of that line. We obtain column densities (10^12 to 10^15 cm^-2) and optical depths (~1 or less) for each exciting transition. We conclude that the populations are far from being in thermal equilibrium. We do not observe any lines excited from the far blue wing of Ly_alpha, which implies that the molecular features are excited by an absorbed profile. SiIV and CIV (corrected for H2 emission) have widths of ~200 km/s, and an array of centroids (blueshifted lines, centered, redshifted). These characteristics are difficult to understand in the context of current models of the accretion shock. For DR Tau we observe transient strong blueshifted emission, perhaps the a result of reconnection events in the magnetosphere. We also see evidence of multiple emission regions for the hot lines. While CIV is optically thin in most stars in our sample, SiIV is not. However, CIV is a good predictor of SiIV and H2 emission. We conclude that most of the flux in the hot lines may be due to accretion processes, but the line profiles can have multiple and variable components.